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  1. #10
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    Re: anchor type/weight

    I use a Bruce anchor in the Mandy delta for a 21 foot sea hawk.
    It works great. I also have a home made one that looks like a grappling hook designed like a richter anchor that works great in rocks and most mud.

  2. #9
    Senior Member brokea--boater's Avatar
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    Re: anchor type/weight

    Quote Originally Posted by Waterdog View Post
    I have fished and boated the delta for 50+ years and have always used a Danforth fluke anchor. The delta bottom is mud, almost 100% of it is mud and a danforth works best in mud or sand. The other anchors you mention are unnecessary and overkill in the shallow muddy delta. Attach about 6 of chain and 100 of rope and you can anchor anywhere in the delta.
    I have found the ratio anchor rope to depth in the delta to 5 to 10 Max for every foot of depth. On average I use about 7 of rope per foot of depth. So 10 depth about 70 anchor rope. Although there are deeper places in the delta much of it 15 deep or less. (I have an 18 alumaweld and the danforth holds me quite well)
    There you have it, Anchoring 101. Get 10' feet of chain for that size hull. No idea about your area that you want to anchor in, but mud a Danforth or Fortress. As suggested, you'll need a couple different styles if your in a area were the bottom composition changes,,,gregg

  3. #8
    Senior Member Seon's Avatar
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    Re: anchor type/weight

    Quote Originally Posted by salmonid View Post
    The "delta" isn't the Sac metro. On the Sac or American rivers the bottom substrate is large cobble (rocks). A fluke type anchor just isn't as good as the Columbia style in a rocky river like the OP is interested in.

    Being that I've never anchored on the northern Sac river, that's good to know.

    I've been asked about my Columbia Anchor System so thought I'd just post a picture.

    IMG_1654.jpg

  4. #7
    Senior Member Waterdog's Avatar
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    Re: anchor type/weight

    Quote Originally Posted by salmonid View Post
    The "delta" isn't the Sac metro. On the Sac or American rivers the bottom substrate is large cobble (rocks). A fluke type anchor just isn't as good as the Columbia style in a rocky river like the OP is interested in.

    We've seen so many boats slip on anchor with the flukes this year it's crazy. Discovery, Verona, and further upriver the Columbia style is the best way to go.

    We've watched boats slowly slip downstream while their fluke anchors were dragging this year in the high flows. The boaters seem surprised when they end up moving down river... Also the repeat and rinse of throwing the anchor and hoping it holds must be pretty maddening!
    You are correct salmonid, I saw Metro but my mind read Delta.
    A dansforth anchor is not a good choice for rocky bottoms. I would suggest a grapnel anchor.
    Last edited by Waterdog; 06-27-2019 at 07:08 AM.
    Hunting, Fishing and Labrador Retrievers and at the end of the day a glass of Buffalo Trace Whiskey- Life is Sweet.

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  6. #6
    Super Moderator salmonid's Avatar
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    Re: anchor type/weight

    The "delta" isn't the Sac metro. On the Sac or American rivers the bottom substrate is large cobble (rocks). A fluke type anchor just isn't as good as the Columbia style in a rocky river like the OP is interested in.

    We've seen so many boats slip on anchor with the flukes this year it's crazy. Discovery, Verona, and further upriver the Columbia style is the best way to go.

    We've watched boats slowly slip downstream while their fluke anchors were dragging this year in the high flows. The boaters seem surprised when they end up moving down river... Also the repeat and rinse of throwing the anchor and hoping it holds must be pretty maddening!
    Here they come!

    <img src=http://fishsniffer.com/forums/signaturepics/sigpic27707_1.gif border=0 alt= />

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  8. #5
    Senior Member Waterdog's Avatar
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    Re: anchor type/weight

    I have fished and boated the delta for 50+ years and have always used a Danforth fluke anchor. The delta bottom is mud, almost 100% of it is mud and a danforth works best in mud or sand. The other anchors you mention are unnecessary and overkill in the shallow muddy delta. Attach about 6 of chain and 100 of rope and you can anchor anywhere in the delta.
    I have found the ratio anchor rope to depth in the delta to 5 to 10 Max for every foot of depth. On average I use about 7 of rope per foot of depth. So 10 depth about 70 anchor rope. Although there are deeper places in the delta much of it 15 deep or less. (I have an 18 alumaweld and the danforth holds me quite well)
    Hunting, Fishing and Labrador Retrievers and at the end of the day a glass of Buffalo Trace Whiskey- Life is Sweet.

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  10. #4
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    Re: anchor type/weight

    Thing in my book is to have different anchors for different applications. I have heavy types, danforth types, box types, jug types, and even a parachute type to drift with. Buy and carry the type that works for the thing you want to do that day. I have a storage box just for all of them too to keep the weather off and reduce any thing that can happen to them or any chains as well......Jetspray
    2003 Alumaweld, 19'6", Chevy vortec V-6, SD-309 american turbine jet, T-8 Yamaha kicker, waiting for the tackle fairy to show up to fill my boxes

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  12. #3
    Senior Member Seon's Avatar
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    Re: anchor type/weight

    I would think a Columbia Rocker Anchor would be an over kill in the Sac river.

    A Danforth anchor would do...but what do I know ?

    But if you decide for the Columbia, I have a galvanized Columbia River Anchor System that's available.

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  14. #2
    Super Moderator salmonid's Avatar
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    Re: anchor type/weight

    Columbia River anchor all the way.
    Here they come!

    <img src=http://fishsniffer.com/forums/signaturepics/sigpic27707_1.gif border=0 alt= />

  15. #1
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    anchor type/weight

    Hey all, I recently upsized boats and was curious as to what weight and type anchor I would need for the Sac Metro area for an 18.5-foot heavy gauge aluminum boat. Would a 25lb Richter anchor be enough to keep me planted, or should I opt for a Columbia River style anchor? Most of my fishing will be in the Sacramento River for salmon and striper.

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