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  1. #5
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    Re: Total Kokanee Newb here...

    Quote Originally Posted by BrotherWilliams View Post
    Pretty tough to attach a downrigger to a float tube. :D
    Sounds like the makings of a bet....

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  3. #4
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    Re: Total Kokanee Newb here...

    Quote Originally Posted by fishwrong2 View Post
    I agree they arenít necessary, but they are often easier than the alternative. Kokanee are temperature sensitive and tend to suspend at a uniform depth. In the early season they can be up shallow and itís relatively easy to get down 25-35í to them. As things heat up youíre often fishing 70-100í.

    You can get down 80í with lots of leadcore, trolling weights, divers etc., but the gear gets so heavy itís hard to manage and not very sporting. Thatís not to say itís not effective, some old school leadcore guys are deadly (I wouldnít bet against MKE no matter how fantasy a rig I had). Another way to tackle them is to jig spoons. Later in the season they tend to school up tighter, closer to structure and you can mark them and catch them that way. Several lakes up in Oregon with big numbers of small fish produce better jigging than trolling. Only downside is you donít cover much water that way, so if fish are scattered itís kind of a needle in a haystack thing.

    For colder waters like Tahoe, Stampede and Donner you can get some fish shallower year round. All kinds of options if you need to.

    With all that said, downriggers donít need to be expensive and are easy to use once you get used to them. In my poor college days Iíd make a downrigger out of Dacron line, a 3# weight and a release clip. Tie a loop every 10 feet. Attach the line to the release clip, drop down 5 loops, hook the loop on a cleat and youíre trolling at 50í. It was honestly a pain in the ass, but it worked. For $100 you can find a decent used downrigger rigged and ready to go.

    Just a matter of choice. Thatís my story anyway.

    Good luck.
    Pretty tough to attach a downrigger to a float tube. :D

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  5. #3
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    Re: Total Kokanee Newb here...

    I agree they arenít necessary, but they are often easier than the alternative. Kokanee are temperature sensitive and tend to suspend at a uniform depth. In the early season they can be up shallow and itís relatively easy to get down 25-35í to them. As things heat up youíre often fishing 70-100í.

    You can get down 80í with lots of leadcore, trolling weights, divers etc., but the gear gets so heavy itís hard to manage and not very sporting. Thatís not to say itís not effective, some old school leadcore guys are deadly (I wouldnít bet against MKE no matter how fantasy a rig I had). Another way to tackle them is to jig spoons. Later in the season they tend to school up tighter, closer to structure and you can mark them and catch them that way. Several lakes up in Oregon with big numbers of small fish produce better jigging than trolling. Only downside is you donít cover much water that way, so if fish are scattered itís kind of a needle in a haystack thing.

    For colder waters like Tahoe, Stampede and Donner you can get some fish shallower year round. All kinds of options if you need to.

    With all that said, downriggers donít need to be expensive and are easy to use once you get used to them. In my poor college days Iíd make a downrigger out of Dacron line, a 3# weight and a release clip. Tie a loop every 10 feet. Attach the line to the release clip, drop down 5 loops, hook the loop on a cleat and youíre trolling at 50í. It was honestly a pain in the ass, but it worked. For $100 you can find a decent used downrigger rigged and ready to go.

    Just a matter of choice. Thatís my story anyway.

    Good luck.

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  7. #2
    Senior Member MKE's Avatar
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    Re: Total Kokanee Newb here...

    No they are not necessary. I absolutely hammer the kokanee in Tahoe from a kayak using lead core on one rig and a top line with the other rig.

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  9. #1
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    Total Kokanee Newb here...

    I dislike using downriggers. Are they absolutely necessary for Koke fishing? Please advise...

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