Page 1 of 6 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 51
  1. #51
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    99
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Is bass good eating?

    dsa2780, I really enjoyed reading your post. You are talented both as a cook and as an angler!

  2. #50
    Senior Member sollimes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tracy
    Posts
    1,583
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Is bass good eating?

    Quote Originally Posted by dsa2780 View Post
    Goddammit guys. You resurrected one of the few subjects that easily starts me off on a rant. Bass eating.

    To begin, if you ever see my reports or read my recipes in the cooking section of the numerous forums I'm on, you'll see that I cook with a lot of bass. Almost never do I cook with large mouth bass. It is always smallmouth bass, spotted bass or redeye alabama spotted bass. Reason for that is like many others have said before. Largemouth, unless they are taken from cold lakes or streams, are most often weedy dwellers who have a taste that reflects that of their diet and habitat. They hang out in slop and weeds eating crawdads, shad, bluegills, frogs, bird fledglings and even snakes at times. They're also in my opinion, the laziest of the bass species. When the water gets warm, largemouth just take to retreating into a slop pile or pad and sit there all day waiting for food to come by. They don't move around as much as smallmouth and spots do. To me, the flesh is a little less dense, a little more watery and isn't as clean tasting as a smallmouth or spot. I release almost 100 percent of the largemouth I catch. On the occasion, when it's fall and the bass are schooling up and busting and only eating threadfin, I might keep a limit of 12" ones for my smoker. Bass smoked with alder or cherry wood is actually REALLY good. Rule of thumb with most fish, smaller ones taste way better and if we're going to talk about the Mercury thing, yes, they have less mercury content.

    Onto smallmouth bass, my second favorite bass to eat. When it comes to smallmouth and a culinary sense, I really enjoy them. I figure that smallmouth really are one of the less pressured fish in the entire CA water system in terms of fishing and people eating them, so I do enjoy a few smallmouth dishes every month. Unlike Largemouth, they eat predominantly crawdads. That's really it. Out of the countless smallmouth I've cleaned and filleted, not once have I ever found anything other than craws in their stomachs. The crustacean diet, gives them a bit of a "sweeter" if you want to use that word, taste and to me, they taste really good grilled whole with some basil vinaigrette on top, or turned into fish sandwiches. They also usually live in colder water and I almost never find smallmouth with sores on them or parasites, which almost every largemouth noticeably has to some degree. Cold water and a diet of almost exclusively low mercury content crayfish means they rank pretty high on my freshwater culinary scale next to spots and stripers.








    Now onto spotted bass and redeye spots. I like to eat and fish for spots. Not only because they're so good tasting, but because I get to actively not feel bad about killing off a limit of them every now and then. In most waters, spotted bass are actually becoming the predominant species of apex predator. Look at Bullards bar, Shasta, and the north delta. Spots are EVERYWHERE. If I can scratch out a limit, I'm going to and some spotted bass blood is going to be flowing. They're mean, piscivorous, put up the fight of a smallmouth and taste almost like a striper. They eat mainly fish and craws. This means that the flesh is going to be dense like a fish eater, but it has the flavor that is found in a crustacean eater as well. Balanced. I respect these fish and I love to eat them. Like the smallmouth bass, a spotted bass can not tolerate warmer waters most of the time, they're near litoral pelagics like stripers are, meaning they travel where the bait and prey is. They're not residential fish like a largemouth who is content waiting for food to come to him. They expend energy and move around a lot, meaning they have that dense flesh that flakes really nicely when cooked. Spots are also most likely to be caught in midwinter. Cold deep water caught spotted bass, bled, gutted and put on ice in the middle of midwinter can only be beaten by striper and sturgeon in my opinion. They make excellent fish and chips, they grill nicely and I even will wrap the fillets in tin foil with a bit of olive oil, salt and pepper and toss it on the grill. No fishy taste, and is a great meal. In the lakes, I encourage people to take an active part in keeping and eating spots. Bullards bar and Shasta are overrun with them, so even if you're only eating some 12" ones, it helps to restore the trout and koke fisheries.

























    And on the subject of not needing to add a lot of ingredients into a fish determining if it tastes good or not, I don't really like to adhere to that. I'm convinced that I can make most fish not just bare minimal edible, but tastes good enough to where my friends and family want to eat more of it, all by taking a little bit more time and effort into preparing fish for a meal than just simply battering all of my fish up and frying it. You can make anything taste edible by frying in beer batter, and while I love eating that as much as anyone else, I find that there are some really cool old and new age recipes and ways of preparing fish that a good portion of anglers ignore in favor of just frying fish. I like eating fish as part of a healthy diet so a lot of my fish recipes are either grilled, smoked, baked or shallow pan fried. So to me personally, the effort needed to make a dish and meal all the more interesting and good tasting is worth it in the long run. I killed the animal and am going to use it to fuel my body, so why not take the time to pay it a little respect and make a good meal out of it?


    Bass are going nowhere anytime soon. Unlike the striper, they spawn on beds so they already have a biological procreating advantage and for the most part they can adapt and live in most situations and often times, as with largemouth in the delta, or with spots in the lakes, they become one of, if not the most common species around. I don't feel bad about killing them and eating them. They help to fuel me and I respect them as a gamefish and as their own respective species. Sure, I dig wild trout, salmon, striper and lingcod, but bass have their own special place in my heart as an angler and in my kitchen as someone who enjoys to cook.



    Take what you will from this and form your own opinion. I'm not trying to convince anyone of anything, just giving my own personal opinion on a controversial issue in the angling community.

    End of rant.
    ++++1

    Every job is a self portrait of the person who does it. Autograph your work with excellence.

  3. #49
    Senior Member dsa2780's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    38.521164, -121.523538
    Posts
    2,465
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Is bass good eating?

    Goddammit guys. You resurrected one of the few subjects that easily starts me off on a rant. Bass eating.

    To begin, if you ever see my reports or read my recipes in the cooking section of the numerous forums I'm on, you'll see that I cook with a lot of bass. Almost never do I cook with large mouth bass. It is always smallmouth bass, spotted bass or redeye alabama spotted bass. Reason for that is like many others have said before. Largemouth, unless they are taken from cold lakes or streams, are most often weedy dwellers who have a taste that reflects that of their diet and habitat. They hang out in slop and weeds eating crawdads, shad, bluegills, frogs, bird fledglings and even snakes at times. They're also in my opinion, the laziest of the bass species. When the water gets warm, largemouth just take to retreating into a slop pile or pad and sit there all day waiting for food to come by. They don't move around as much as smallmouth and spots do. To me, the flesh is a little less dense, a little more watery and isn't as clean tasting as a smallmouth or spot. I release almost 100 percent of the largemouth I catch. On the occasion, when it's fall and the bass are schooling up and busting and only eating threadfin, I might keep a limit of 12" ones for my smoker. Bass smoked with alder or cherry wood is actually REALLY good. Rule of thumb with most fish, smaller ones taste way better and if we're going to talk about the Mercury thing, yes, they have less mercury content.

    Onto smallmouth bass, my second favorite bass to eat. When it comes to smallmouth and a culinary sense, I really enjoy them. I figure that smallmouth really are one of the less pressured fish in the entire CA water system in terms of fishing and people eating them, so I do enjoy a few smallmouth dishes every month. Unlike Largemouth, they eat predominantly crawdads. That's really it. Out of the countless smallmouth I've cleaned and filleted, not once have I ever found anything other than craws in their stomachs. The crustacean diet, gives them a bit of a "sweeter" if you want to use that word, taste and to me, they taste really good grilled whole with some basil vinaigrette on top, or turned into fish sandwiches. They also usually live in colder water and I almost never find smallmouth with sores on them or parasites, which almost every largemouth noticeably has to some degree. Cold water and a diet of almost exclusively low mercury content crayfish means they rank pretty high on my freshwater culinary scale next to spots and stripers.








    Now onto spotted bass and redeye spots. I like to eat and fish for spots. Not only because they're so good tasting, but because I get to actively not feel bad about killing off a limit of them every now and then. In most waters, spotted bass are actually becoming the predominant species of apex predator. Look at Bullards bar, Shasta, and the north delta. Spots are EVERYWHERE. If I can scratch out a limit, I'm going to and some spotted bass blood is going to be flowing. They're mean, piscivorous, put up the fight of a smallmouth and taste almost like a striper. They eat mainly fish and craws. This means that the flesh is going to be dense like a fish eater, but it has the flavor that is found in a crustacean eater as well. Balanced. I respect these fish and I love to eat them. Like the smallmouth bass, a spotted bass can not tolerate warmer waters most of the time, they're near litoral pelagics like stripers are, meaning they travel where the bait and prey is. They're not residential fish like a largemouth who is content waiting for food to come to him. They expend energy and move around a lot, meaning they have that dense flesh that flakes really nicely when cooked. Spots are also most likely to be caught in midwinter. Cold deep water caught spotted bass, bled, gutted and put on ice in the middle of midwinter can only be beaten by striper and sturgeon in my opinion. They make excellent fish and chips, they grill nicely and I even will wrap the fillets in tin foil with a bit of olive oil, salt and pepper and toss it on the grill. No fishy taste, and is a great meal. In the lakes, I encourage people to take an active part in keeping and eating spots. Bullards bar and Shasta are overrun with them, so even if you're only eating some 12" ones, it helps to restore the trout and koke fisheries.

























    And on the subject of not needing to add a lot of ingredients into a fish determining if it tastes good or not, I don't really like to adhere to that. I'm convinced that I can make most fish not just bare minimal edible, but tastes good enough to where my friends and family want to eat more of it, all by taking a little bit more time and effort into preparing fish for a meal than just simply battering all of my fish up and frying it. You can make anything taste edible by frying in beer batter, and while I love eating that as much as anyone else, I find that there are some really cool old and new age recipes and ways of preparing fish that a good portion of anglers ignore in favor of just frying fish. I like eating fish as part of a healthy diet so a lot of my fish recipes are either grilled, smoked, baked or shallow pan fried. So to me personally, the effort needed to make a dish and meal all the more interesting and good tasting is worth it in the long run. I killed the animal and am going to use it to fuel my body, so why not take the time to pay it a little respect and make a good meal out of it?


    Bass are going nowhere anytime soon. Unlike the striper, they spawn on beds so they already have a biological procreating advantage and for the most part they can adapt and live in most situations and often times, as with largemouth in the delta, or with spots in the lakes, they become one of, if not the most common species around. I don't feel bad about killing them and eating them. They help to fuel me and I respect them as a gamefish and as their own respective species. Sure, I dig wild trout, salmon, striper and lingcod, but bass have their own special place in my heart as an angler and in my kitchen as someone who enjoys to cook.



    Take what you will from this and form your own opinion. I'm not trying to convince anyone of anything, just giving my own personal opinion on a controversial issue in the angling community.

    End of rant.
    Last edited by dsa2780; 06-11-2014 at 04:33 PM.

  4. #48
    Senior Member shadbuster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Salida
    Age
    32
    Posts
    1,217
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Is bass good eating?

    To me they taste great, they are a good frying fish because they cook up fast so the breading is nice and golden when the fish is done. I've never tasted a bad bass and I ate them from clean lakes and river as well as weedy murky places, although I practice selective harvest and only keep the smaller ones (within legal limits of course) and let the big ones go. So maybe smaller ones havent accumulated the bad taste people talk about.
    Give a man a fish, he eats for one day, teach a man to fish and he takes all your fish!

  5. #47
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Yuba City
    Posts
    473
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Is bass good eating?

    Quote Originally Posted by Sac/Striper/Slayer View Post
    Also on tilapia. I'm not sure if people know this but they mainly eat deficate. They keep them in private fish hatcheries to keep the water free of poo. That's enough to keep me away from them.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I tried talapia one time when I was at.a.training center the fed us ,I foolishly took a second bite, it tasted.like what they eat,every time I see them for sale.in a.store.I just feel.sorry for.people who eat them.

    Sent from my KFTHWI using Tapatalk 2

  6. #46
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    35
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Is bass good eating?

    I've eaten a few spotted bass and everytime they have tasted amazing (dredged in LA seasoning and fried)....white, flaky, tender meat with super mild taste. I have heard it depends on the water you catch them in; all of mine are from American river, but there are also mercury warning on them, so I don't make it a habit.

  7. #45
    Senior Member Starscream's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    278
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Is bass good eating?

    Bass isnt that bad the meat is moree stiffer. Id say for what i think it taste better than carp. U can eat almost any fish u want as long as its legal and if u know how to make it taste good. Theres a reason they put a limit on most fishes so dont worry about people telling u u cant eat it unless it has alot of mercury then u might want to cut back a lilo.

  8. #44
    Senior Member Sac/Striper/Slayer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Citrus Heights, ca
    Age
    36
    Posts
    574
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Is bass good eating?

    Also on tilapia. I'm not sure if people know this but they mainly eat deficate. They keep them in private fish hatcheries to keep the water free of poo. That's enough to keep me away from them.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    The way to a man's heart is through his fly!!!!!

  9. #43
    Senior Member Sac/Striper/Slayer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Citrus Heights, ca
    Age
    36
    Posts
    574
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Is bass good eating?

    Say what ya want but largemouth does not taste the same as spotted or smallmouth. I even think spotted bass are pretty gross. They are definitely not really a eating fish. I catch so many of other fish that taste so much better I see no reason to eat any bass besides striped bass but that's just me.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    The way to a man's heart is through his fly!!!!!

  10. #42
    It's never good enough hrairguitar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Sacramento/Carmichael
    Posts
    480
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Is bass good eating?

    This whole thread is like nails on a chalkboard for us catch and release guys haha. Are you sure you don't want advice on some nice hatchery grown stocked rainbow trout? I hear they taste amazing lol

Page 1 of 6 123 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •