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hqly2001
08-21-2006, 08:09 AM
I like my rock fish steamed whole but i noticed that it's hard to scale them.. the scale is like embedded in the skin and meat.. so it doesn't come off.. any idea how to scale these things better?

FatCat
08-21-2006, 08:24 AM
My bro and I were just debating this last night. He scales them even if he is going to skin them. Way too much work for me.

My wife loves whole rockies in a soup. I find that the smaller ones are far easier to scale and fit in the pot better, too. People think I am crazy for keeping the little guys (and the decapitated heads of larger ones) but they don't have Japanese wives to go home to! Sorry I don't have a new technique for ya, I just run the knife up the sides.

bluestar
08-21-2006, 08:41 AM
any object that can effectively catch the scales can be used to scale fish. I usually use an Asian kitchen knife with a rectangle blade, but I have once used the broad side of a chisel with equal success.

You just need to push down and scrape back hard enough. There will be a few here and there that are hard to get off, just use your fingers to pull them off.

The scales on the belly area are much smaller and a bit harder to scale; sometimes you're scraping very hard and nothing comes off. In this case, use the sharp tip of a knife to break/ruffle up one spot, then it will get going.

Asians also have this one special tool specifically designed to scale fish. It is metalic; one end is a handle and the other end has columns of little claws that are fine enough to catch fish scale but not sharp enough to break fish skin. It is very effective. You can see this tool in action in most of the Asian fish markets.

fbanaria
08-21-2006, 09:06 AM
Buy a fish scaler sold in baitshops. It looks like a curved flat metal thing with serrated ridges on the bottom to scale the fish. Cheap, probably less than $3. It can handle the toughest of scales in all fishes, stripers included.

The_Hardwayz
08-21-2006, 09:50 AM
I use a metal spoon from my silverware drawer. I found that useful for scaling my fish. I try and find the biggest spoon that seems to work pretty good. I have a filipino girlfriend and she likes the fish whole too. Too much work I rather fillet the fish but if that makes her happy then that's what I have to do.

AllFishNoWork
08-21-2006, 10:29 AM
I like the just the filets, grilled, broiled or fried wrapped in a corn tortilla with salsa [smiley=chowtime.gif]

hqly2001
08-21-2006, 11:06 AM
any object that can effectively catch the scales can be used to scale fish. *I usually use an Asian kitchen knife with a rectangle blade, but I have once used the broad side of a chisel with equal success.

You just need to push down and scrape back hard enough. *There will be a few here and there that are hard to get off, just use your fingers to pull them off.

The scales on the belly area are much smaller and a bit harder to scale; sometimes you're scraping very hard and nothing comes off. *In this case, use the sharp tip of a knife to break/ruffle up one spot, then it will get going.

Asians also have this one special tool specifically designed to scale fish. *It is metalic; one end is a handle and the other end has columns of little claws that are fine enough to catch fish scale but not sharp enough to break fish skin. *It is very effective. *You can see this tool in action in most of the Asian fish markets.

I know how to scale a fish, but rock fish is odd in that the scaled are inverted.. i tried using a scaler and still have problems.. i can scale a striper, salmon easily.. but for rock fish. when u try to scale it.. the scale digs depper into the meat instead of coming off.. i guess i can hand scale/pluck it..

Blue_R70
08-21-2006, 11:27 AM
If you fish from a party boat just have the deckhand do a "gut and gill" job for you instead of filleting the fish. A gut and gill job removes the guts, gills and scales...perfect for steaming.

CORN
08-21-2006, 03:50 PM
any object that can effectively catch the scales can be used to scale fish. *I usually use an Asian kitchen knife with a rectangle blade, but I have once used the broad side of a chisel with equal success.

You just need to push down and scrape back hard enough. *There will be a few here and there that are hard to get off, just use your fingers to pull them off.

The scales on the belly area are much smaller and a bit harder to scale; sometimes you're scraping very hard and nothing comes off. *In this case, use the sharp tip of a knife to break/ruffle up one spot, then it will get going.

Asians also have this one special tool specifically designed to scale fish. *It is metalic; one end is a handle and the other end has columns of little claws that are fine enough to catch fish scale but not sharp enough to break fish skin. *It is very effective. *You can see this tool in action in most of the Asian fish markets.

My wife's Chinese co-workers LOVE fish, so we always give them a bunch. In return, they picked up a few fish scalers during their last visit to China. Excellent scalers... sounds like the one bluestar described.

keciga1
08-21-2006, 04:24 PM
If you don't want to or cant find a fish scaler, you can also use a fork, worked for me untill I got one of those fish scalers.

fathom
08-21-2006, 06:59 PM
What I do with my Salmon is a high pressure water nosel and start at the tail and work your way up and they fly in the air like snow flakes and it does not hurt the meat. I dont do it on the rock becaues I just filet them, but they have bigger scales so it would work better.

sethonious
08-22-2006, 09:39 AM
I use Fathom's method for rock fish and it works really well. The scales hang on a lot tougher than a salmon, but it blasts them off better than any scaler. Plus you can do it outside. If you have ever scaled a fish indoors, you'll be finding scales everywhere for months. It is also good for all those little scales on the head, if you like to eat the head meat as much as I do.

Whole steamed, fried, bbq'd rockies are my favorite!

mike22ca
08-22-2006, 11:19 AM
I catch, fillet, and release ;)

fathom
08-22-2006, 12:18 PM
I use Fathom's method for rock fish and it works really well. *The scales hang on a lot tougher than a salmon, but it blasts them off better than any scaler. *Plus you can do it outside. *If you have ever scaled a fish indoors, you'll be finding scales everywhere for months. It is also good for all those little scales on the head, if you like to eat the head meat as much as I do.

Whole steamed, fried, bbq'd rockies are my favorite!



I have never tried to eat or cook whole rock fish, do they get gutted first? How about some recipies for that and I will try them. Thanks John

sethonious
08-22-2006, 04:05 PM
Of course you gut it!

1) scale fish
2) gut fish
3) score the flesh in a criss cross pattern with a knife.
4) fry the fish in hot oil(my favorite), or BBQ it. You will know when it is done because you have scored the flesh and you will be able to look inside. When it is opaque, flakey but still moist, it is done.
5) make a sauce/vinagrettey thing with:
-green onions
-soy sauce
-sesame oil
-tobasco (or hot fermented bean paste if you are so inclined)
-honey
-finely grated ginger
6) splash sauce on fish or serve for dipping on the side.

Blue_R70
08-22-2006, 05:55 PM
1) scale fish
2) gut fish
3) score the flesh in a criss cross pattern with a knife.
4) fry the fish in hot oil(my favorite), or BBQ it. You will know when it is done because you have scored the flesh and you will be able to look inside. When it is opaque, flakey but still moist, it is done.
5) make a sauce/vinagrettey thing with:
-green onions
-soy sauce
-sesame oil
-tobasco (or hot fermented bean paste if you are so inclined)
-honey
-finely grated ginger
6) splash sauce on fish or serve for dipping on the side.


Or just take the fish to your favorite Chinese restaurant and have them cook it. The charge to steam 'em is just a few bucks but if you give them a fish or two for dinner they just might do it for free or toss you some bonus dishes. But remember: you're not bartering/trading/selling (that'd be illegal), you're gifting them some of your extra catch.

hqly2001
08-22-2006, 08:41 PM
For those who haven't tried it steamed, try it and you will have the most tender and moist peice of meat.. I try to use the different kinds of rock fish and find that they all come out pretty good.. anything besides the blue comes out moister..
jullienne up some scallion have some sweet soy sauce ready.. heat up some oil.. once the fish is done.. drain it then layer some scallion on the fish.. spoon some soy sauce over it and then pour the sizzling oil on top it all.. searve with rice or just eat it all by itself..

Try it once and if you don;t like tender & moist meat then grilll it next time..

hqly2001
08-22-2006, 08:43 PM
1) scale fish
2) gut fish
3) score the flesh in a criss cross pattern with a knife.
4) fry the fish in hot oil(my favorite), or BBQ it. *You will know when it is done because you have scored the flesh and you will be able to look inside. *When it is opaque, flakey but still moist, it is done.
5) make a sauce/vinagrettey thing with:
-green onions
-soy sauce
-sesame oil
-tobasco (or hot fermented bean paste if you are so inclined)
-honey
-finely grated ginger
6) splash sauce on fish or serve for dipping on the side.


Or just take the fish to your favorite Chinese restaurant and have them cook it. *The charge to steam 'em is just a few bucks but if you give them a fish or two for dinner they just might do it for free or toss you some bonus dishes. *But remember: you're not bartering/trading/selling (that'd be illegal), you're gifting them some of your extra catch. *

Goodluck.. unless you know the restaurant owner.. they will nto do it for you.. i've asked a couple and none was willing to cook the catch.. they said that the liability is too high.. i mean if u get sick of die from eating the fish.. they are responsible.. so none will take the chance.. i still hope to find a place willing to cook my catch some day..

slick88
08-22-2006, 09:06 PM
1) scale fish
2) gut fish
3) score the flesh in a criss cross pattern with a knife.
4) fry the fish in hot oil(my favorite), or BBQ it. *You will know when it is done because you have scored the flesh and you will be able to look inside. *When it is opaque, flakey but still moist, it is done.
5) make a sauce/vinagrettey thing with:
-green onions
-soy sauce
-sesame oil
-tobasco (or hot fermented bean paste if you are so inclined)
-honey
-finely grated ginger
6) splash sauce on fish or serve for dipping on the side.


Or just take the fish to your favorite Chinese restaurant and have them cook it. *The charge to steam 'em is just a few bucks but if you give them a fish or two for dinner they just might do it for free or toss you some bonus dishes. *But remember: you're not bartering/trading/selling (that'd be illegal), you're gifting them some of your extra catch. *

Goodluck.. unless you know the restaurant owner.. they will nto do it for you.. i've asked a couple and none was willing to cook the catch.. they said that the liability is too high.. i mean if u get sick of die from eating the fish.. they are responsible.. so none will take the chance.. i still hope to find a place willing to cook my catch some day..



I've brought fish to two Chinese restaurants in SF last month without any problems and I didn't know the owners. A friend brought a whole ling cod to Koi Palace in Daly City and they served it up three different ways (soup, sauteed, and clay pot).

Which restaurants did you inquire?

hqly2001
08-22-2006, 09:27 PM
1) scale fish
2) gut fish
3) score the flesh in a criss cross pattern with a knife.
4) fry the fish in hot oil(my favorite), or BBQ it. *You will know when it is done because you have scored the flesh and you will be able to look inside. *When it is opaque, flakey but still moist, it is done.
5) make a sauce/vinagrettey thing with:
-green onions
-soy sauce
-sesame oil
-tobasco (or hot fermented bean paste if you are so inclined)
-honey
-finely grated ginger
6) splash sauce on fish or serve for dipping on the side.


Or just take the fish to your favorite Chinese restaurant and have them cook it. *The charge to steam 'em is just a few bucks but if you give them a fish or two for dinner they just might do it for free or toss you some bonus dishes. *But remember: you're not bartering/trading/selling (that'd be illegal), you're gifting them some of your extra catch. *

Goodluck.. unless you know the restaurant owner.. they will nto do it for you.. i've asked a couple and none was willing to cook the catch.. they said that the liability is too high.. i mean if u get sick of die from eating the fish.. they are responsible.. so none will take the chance.. i still hope to find a place willing to cook my catch some day..



I've brought fish to two Chinese restaurants in SF last month without any problems and I didn't know the owners. A friend brought a whole ling cod to Koi Palace in Daly City and they served it up three different ways (soup, sauteed, and clay pot).

Which restaurants did you inquire?

I inquired at Diamo in the el Cerrito shopping center and also chinahouse a local chinese restaurant.

I might have to go to SF for this then.. What kinds of fish did u bring to the chinese restaurant? Were they celeaned and ready to go? how much did they charge you?

Do you know how much Koi palace charged your friend? heck i would love to bring the ling cod there and have it cooked 3 ways!

slick88
08-22-2006, 09:48 PM
1) scale fish
2) gut fish
3) score the flesh in a criss cross pattern with a knife.
4) fry the fish in hot oil(my favorite), or BBQ it. *You will know when it is done because you have scored the flesh and you will be able to look inside. *When it is opaque, flakey but still moist, it is done.
5) make a sauce/vinagrettey thing with:
-green onions
-soy sauce
-sesame oil
-tobasco (or hot fermented bean paste if you are so inclined)
-honey
-finely grated ginger
6) splash sauce on fish or serve for dipping on the side.


Or just take the fish to your favorite Chinese restaurant and have them cook it. *The charge to steam 'em is just a few bucks but if you give them a fish or two for dinner they just might do it for free or toss you some bonus dishes. *But remember: you're not bartering/trading/selling (that'd be illegal), you're gifting them some of your extra catch. *

Goodluck.. unless you know the restaurant owner.. they will nto do it for you.. i've asked a couple and none was willing to cook the catch.. they said that the liability is too high.. i mean if u get sick of die from eating the fish.. they are responsible.. so none will take the chance.. i still hope to find a place willing to cook my catch some day..



I've brought fish to two Chinese restaurants in SF last month without any problems and I didn't know the owners. A friend brought a whole ling cod to Koi Palace in Daly City and they served it up three different ways (soup, sauteed, and clay pot).

Which restaurants did you inquire?

I inquired at Diamo in the el Cerrito shopping center and also chinahouse a local chinese restaurant.

I might have to go to SF for this then.. What kinds of fish did u bring to the chinese restaurant? Were they celeaned and ready to go? how much did they charge you?

Do you know how much Koi palace charged your friend? heck i would love to bring the ling cod there and have it cooked 3 ways!

I suppose being with Chinese speaking people would help being able to bring in your own fish.

Anyway, the first restaurant, Golden River on Geary Blvd, I brought two black rockfish. I didn't pay the bill but I think it may have been $5 per fish. This is more of a lower-end family-style place. The second one was Tong Palace Seafood on Clement St and I brought one gopher (brown) rockfish where it was $10, a step up in class from Golden River.

I asked my friend about the fee for the Ling @ Koi Palace, but he didn't see the itemized bill but the entire dinner for 10 people was around $400 he said. However, that is a really super-upscale Chinese seafood place with huge tanks of live fish so naturally it's not going to be cheap over there.

BTW, when steamed, I noticed that the gophers taste a bit better. If you steam it yourself, it's important not to overcook these rockfish or they become soft and mushy.

hqly2001
08-22-2006, 10:50 PM
5-10 bucks is not bad.. Diamo said he won;t take the risk and why not buy the fish from him lol...

To be honest, i think i can eat 2-3 rock fish myself in a setting.. those things are small and light..

I'm going to call afew other resturant to see if they will cook it for me.. but after cooking some myself recently.. they turned out pretty darn good!

I caught some light redish orange,whitish fishes.. they are not vermillion(bright red) nor canary.. any idea what they were?

I agree that gophers were pretty darn good!

fishenrick
08-23-2006, 12:33 AM
hgly, are you talking about the ones we caught? If so, you are probally refering to the china, I know we caught blues,blacks, vermillion,canary which was let go and chinas, I don't recall any golphers. Next time when you go to a bait store grab a ocean regulation book, it has some pictures of different species.

hqly2001
08-23-2006, 08:01 AM
hgly, are you talking about the ones we caught? If so, you are probally refering to the china, I know we caught blues,blacks, vermillion,canary which was let go and chinas, I don't recall any golphers. Next time when you go to a bait store grab a ocean regulation book, it has some pictures of different species.

fishinrick, yup.. i checked some of them up and it turned out the yellow and black one looks to be a gopher? what kinds were the orange white color? a china? you should try to steam one whole next time bud...

fishenrick
08-23-2006, 11:34 AM
you are talking about a copper rock fish, they can be a orangish or a rust color with light whitish bloches,ya you are right, we did catch some gophers

hqly2001
08-23-2006, 12:30 PM
i do like the copper.. they were faily good eating..
kinda suprise that there's any taste differences sicne ocne you cook them up.. they all look the same hehe