PDA

View Full Version : Kamaloop Trout



dpars
02-22-2013, 08:29 AM
Growing up on Shasta Lake, I used to catch tons of Kamaloop trout. They always seem to fight better than standard California Rainbows, and were very hearty. I've never seen any Kamaloops down here in the Central Valley or Sierras. I started doing a little research on them, and saw that they only planted around 1000 of these fish in Shasta back in 1950, yet the population was real strong in the 80's and early 90's when I fished Shasta a ton. Other research I read said the Kamaloops were better for bank fishing, because they seem to search for food closer to banks.

Any thought on these fish? Are the populations still strong in Shasta? Any reason to not plant these fish in other California lakes? I found a list of a few lakes (Crowley was one) that they have introduced these fish into, but have never fished them before (some I had never even heard of). Any Kamaloop info on these lakes.

Thanks, Don

borntoscout
02-22-2013, 09:25 AM
Some history of the Kamloops strain in Ca. can be read here:

History And Status of Introduced Fishes In California, 1871 (http://content.cdlib.org/view?docId=kt8p30069f;NAAN=13030&doc.view=frames&chunk.id=d0e1618&toc.id=d0e445&brand=calisphere)

DFW has maintained a brood stock in Junction Reservoir (near Kirman Lake) and planted them as fingerlings in lakes with put and grow fisheries. Now that the law requires triploid only plants for most if not all waters two questions loom: will DFW produce triploid Kamloops? and if they do, will all of the instinctual behavior of this wild strain survive the conversion to triploidy?

sollimes
02-22-2013, 09:29 AM
We caught a few up in Dinkey Lakes Wilderness about 5years ago. I think we caught them at either Island or South lake.

dr.fish
02-22-2013, 02:33 PM
Some history of the Kamloops strain in Ca. can be read here:

History And Status of Introduced Fishes In California, 1871 (http://content.cdlib.org/view?docId=kt8p30069f;NAAN=13030&doc.view=frames&chunk.id=d0e1618&toc.id=d0e445&brand=calisphere)

DFW has maintained a brood stock in Junction Reservoir (near Kirman Lake) and planted them as fingerlings in lakes with put and grow fisheries. Now that the law requires triploid only plants for most if not all waters two questions loom: will DFW produce triploid Kamloops? and if they do, will all of the instinctual behavior of this wild strain survive the conversion to triploidy?

Thanks for the info, borntoscout. I was stationed at the MWTC for two years and often biked the Kirman Lake road and wondered what those beautiful rainbows were doing in Junction Lake.

Chris y
02-22-2013, 07:44 PM
Grant lake in the June Lake loop has kamaloops. We've caught several over the years, and on last Mays trip, fishing down by the deep end over the hump in the center I hooked and landed a 5 lb 6 oz 26.75 inch long kamaloop. Tried to revive him but he had a treble hook stuck in his throat and 5 ft of line hanging out of his mouth. He did not make it. I called Ken, the owner of Earnies tackle shop in the loop and asked him if that was considered a big kamaloop and he said if it was his he'd have it mounted. Its still in the freezer. I've got pics, don't know how to post them

Stickman
02-23-2013, 07:37 PM
I have caught Kamloop in French Meadows Lake (up the canyon of the middle fork American River) but that is going back about 15 years. Don't know what the makeup of that fishery is today.

Renron
02-26-2013, 07:24 PM
About 20 or so years ago, when I was living up at Tahoe, my father and I fished Stampede during the winter when we had to hike in. We caught 4 Kamloops, kept two for dinner and laughed at how those fish loved to jump. They were flying fish. Looked like someone was throwing a fish football. LOL . We enjoyed catching those fish for the next few years. Great eating on the BBQ too.
Ron

dpars
02-27-2013, 08:22 AM
About 20 or so years ago, when I was living up at Tahoe, my father and I fished Stampede during the winter when we had to hike in. We caught 4 Kamloops, kept two for dinner and laughed at how those fish loved to jump. They were flying fish. Looked like someone was throwing a fish football. LOL . We enjoyed catching those fish for the next few years. Great eating on the BBQ too.
Ron

Yes, those fish love to jump and run. Always had fun catching them. At Shasta, if you found the schools of them, you could catch 30+ in a day, always on the Shasta Fly(2 pahtzkees salmon eggs and a marshmellow). Good eating fish, as well.

Jay R
02-27-2013, 04:20 PM
Growing up on Shasta Lake, I used to catch tons of Kamaloop trout. They always seem to fight better than standard California Rainbows, and were very hearty. I've never seen any Kamaloops down here in the Central Valley or Sierras. I started doing a little research on them, and saw that they only planted around 1000 of these fish in Shasta back in 1950, yet the population was real strong in the 80's and early 90's when I fished Shasta a ton. Other research I read said the Kamaloops were better for bank fishing, because they seem to search for food closer to banks.

Any thought on these fish? Are the populations still strong in Shasta? Any reason to not plant these fish in other California lakes? I found a list of a few lakes (Crowley was one) that they have introduced these fish into, but have never fished them before (some I had never even heard of). Any Kamaloop info on these lakes.

Thanks, Don

Don,
The KJ's or Kamloops/Junction as they are called are a great sport fish. They seem to fight better, because for the most part they do. They are a more "wild" strain of fish both genetically and because they are planted as fingerlings for put and grow fisheries. The typical planter trout has been breed over the years to have good survival in a hatchery and are normally put in at a catchable size for put and take fisheries. I don't know about the current stocking in Shasta, but because the egg take comes from a single reservoir and the fish are more "wild" the numbers available to plant are limited. They are typically planted in higher elevation lakes and used in air plants. They seem to prefer to eat bugs which works out well for the higher lakes that may not have a forage fish and people like to fly fish. They also stay fairly shallow so they are available to shore anglers.

As a side note on some CA fish history, read that link in the Dill and Cordone book, then search the web for "Kootenay lake gerrard rainbow trout". Having fished Kootenay lake quite a bit as a kid, having family from Nelson BC and seeing both the gerrards and KJ's in action I believe we got bamboozled by the Canadians on this one. According to Dill and Cordone we were supposed to be getting gerrards from the Lardeau river that would feed on bugs etc. until around age 3 when they would switch over to feed on the abundant Kokanee at Shasta (Kootanay lake is the origin of Kokanee as well). They spawn at 6-7 years of age and grow to huge sizes with kokanee forage. But what we got were fish that spawn at age 3, primarily eat bugs and will get to a nice size, but not 15-20 lbs. A very good sport fish, but no way they are gerrards.

Bloodthirsty
02-27-2013, 05:04 PM
Caught a bunch at Shasta last year !

Team Mc Fishing
02-27-2013, 05:39 PM
We caught them in the Shasta team classic last May. The video we did shows us hooking up some nice fighting jumping Kamloops. First time I ever caught any, but I would love to find them in other places.

Team Mc Fishing
Guide Service

borntoscout
02-27-2013, 07:06 PM
I don't know if they are RTKJs or ELT or some magic blend (both have been planted and there is substantial natural repo) but the bows in Spicer Meadows Res. fight hard and are full of jump. They don't grow large (rare to get one over 20 inches) and are easy to catch from the rocks early in the season when they are at the surface.

Jay R
02-28-2013, 12:54 PM
Spicer is a fingerling only plant and gets KJ's when they are available. In the last 10 or so years it's been a mixed bag of KJ's, Shasta's (domesticated hatchery strain), and a couple ELT plants. Last two years have been triploid Shasta strain.

borntoscout
03-03-2013, 07:19 AM
Thanks for the information Jay R. I gather you a connected with DFW in some way. May I ask a question or three? It will be interesting to see how the triploid fingerlings perform in Spicer. Are we correct to assume there will be no more diploid fingerling or sub-c trout planted in west slope reservoirs? Are triploid versions of wild strains such as ELT or KJs planned? Any plans to produce or plant all-female triploids?

Jay R
03-04-2013, 04:03 PM
Thanks for the information Jay R. I gather you a connected with DFW in some way. May I ask a question or three? It will be interesting to see how the triploid fingerlings perform in Spicer. Are we correct to assume there will be no more diploid fingerling or sub-c trout planted in west slope reservoirs? Are triploid versions of wild strains such as ELT or KJs planned? Any plans to produce or plant all-female triploids?


I am the Reservoir Biologist for the North Central Region.
Were still waiting at our level to see how the recent SB1148 will be interpreted to determine what waters and strains will have to be triploid only and which can be diploid. I'm not sure about plans to triploid ELT's or KJ's at this point. Its going to take a year or two for everything to shake out from this legislation to see what trout stocking options we have going forward. I'm not aware of plans to develop only female triploids. If they are triploid it shouldn't matter what sex or strain they are since they won't reproduce. There are some studies out there that suggest the male triploids will still go through a spawning ritual, where as the females won't but both will still be sterile.

49erbassman
03-04-2013, 07:39 PM
Never heard of this species so thanks for all the great info guys!


Sent from my iPhone

borntoscout
03-04-2013, 09:25 PM
Jay R, thank you for taking the time with my questions. Sounds as if there may be hope for a little pragmatisim to survive under SB1148 after all.