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View Full Version : Fishing in Strawberry Ca



stefanoflo
03-26-2013, 10:43 PM
anyone know whats a good spot on the Stanislaus river that goes into Strawberry??I was looking on google maps and was wonder how to get to the river. will the Locals have a problem with me parking at the Local general store??. or is there a place at the Old Bridge ??

BIG_ONE
03-27-2013, 01:12 AM
You can drive along side by side with the river, pull off the road and park anywhere that has no signs that says anything about No Parking and etc. Grab your gears, start hiking down to the river and get fishing! Follow long the river, there will be multiple vehicle parking off the road if your unsure if it's legal to park. Water shoes and shorts comes in handy...wade in knee to waist deep and work around the ripples, pools, drop offs, giant boulders and etc. The water is going to be COLD around this time year! Good luck!

dilbeck
03-27-2013, 03:56 AM
The water is going to be COLD around this time year! Good luck!

I'm also pretty sure it's closed. Would definitely double check the regs!

Bainter1212
03-27-2013, 04:50 AM
Yeah probably closed. Check stream season regs.

stefanoflo
03-27-2013, 07:25 AM
Yeah probably closed. Check stream season regs.

Thanks for all your feedback.I was looking at the Opening of the season. I'm sure the Last Saturday In April we will see plenty of fish and Folks. never been there , heard it was a great spot. I just did`nt want Local's to get pissed at a Flat-lander parking anywhere was he was`nt supposed to
Thanks
Fish On!!!!!!!!
SF

saizo
03-27-2013, 12:06 PM
You just have to be careful fishing by the cabins. Most of that area is posted no trespassing. Some owners don't mind but I have had some tell me not to fish. They usually plant the area by the bridge.

Lifted
03-27-2013, 12:12 PM
You just have to be careful fishing by the cabins. Most of that area is posted no trespassing. Some owners don't mind but I have had some tell me not to fish. They usually plant the area by the bridge.

In Nevada the riverbed is public property, so you have to be on the bank to be trespassing, but are free to wade up and down the river. Anyone know if that's also true in CA?

dilbeck
03-27-2013, 02:09 PM
In Nevada the riverbed is public property, so you have to be on the bank to be trespassing, but are free to wade up and down the river. Anyone know if that's also true in CA?

I've heard that to be true in CA but can't confirm it.

CRABBY
03-27-2013, 03:45 PM
In Nevada the riverbed is public property, so you have to be on the bank to be trespassing, but are free to wade up and down the river. Anyone know if that's also true in CA?To the best of my knowlage it's true here also,just stay below the high water line,pretty easy to tell....:kut7od:

clb101
03-27-2013, 07:02 PM
When the season starts a better access to that river is a left turn off the highway before you get to pinecrest, to camp ground called fraser flat. Its only about 5 miles off 108 and there is no hassels. Really nice campground, i have stayed there and fished it. They usually plant there pretty heavily for the opener...

sollimes
03-28-2013, 08:47 AM
Drive down on Fraser flat road and park at the bridge (plenty of parking) you can walk up river on either side and that will take you to Strawberry, I think its 3miles. Did really good in the summer drifting salmon eggs and casting spoons. Good luck and watch out for snakes. Some pics from last summer.

http://img444.imageshack.us/img444/6853/photo12bt.jpg (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/444/photo12bt.jpg/)
http://img585.imageshack.us/img585/1297/photo14f.jpg (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/585/photo14f.jpg/)
http://img853.imageshack.us/img853/7894/photo13pr.jpg (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/853/photo13pr.jpg/)
http://img33.imageshack.us/img33/6269/photo15cj.jpg (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/33/photo15cj.jpg/)

sarahpee
04-21-2013, 12:16 PM
Yes in Calif. its public land from the riverbed to the high water mark (and the high water mark is usually very high up the bank...at least 10-15ft above the water level) ....the forest service lease holders (cabin peeps) would have you believe they own the river, the water & the fish that go along with it....but it's not the case. And I know that since most of the cabins in this area are on forest service land, that is also public land that legally we can walk on. Most lease holders try to put up barriers, fences, or signs (which the forest service tries to make them take down) to make the average joe think they are "tresspassing" on their land, but this isn't the case, the ONLY thing that is truly private is the structure built upon the forest service land. So if you get any flack from a forest service lease holder that you are tresspassing on their land, politely tell them to "call the sheriff", nothing will result as the lease holders fully know the extent of their land leases, and that they don't actually own the property. The only way you would be tresspassing is if you broke into their cabin & was inside the structure. Technically, you could pitch a tent 5 feet from their front door, and legally, they couldn't do anything. Maybe they would get a shotgun, but that's a different story, they would then be in violation of the law, and obviously, we as fisherpeople, don't ever want to push a situation that far, I was just citing it as an example.

This is also true on places like the russian river. I went on a canoe trip there last summer & the property owners have nice groomed grass & nice lush picnic areas all the way to the water's edge. I was having lunch on one of these pieces of grass (watered & manicured) when the land owner came running down in a huff, saying "get off my land", then I informed him he didn't own the land to the river's edge, just to the high water mark, but he kept barking like a dog. They even have signs down to the water's edge, stating "private property, NO TRESSPASSING".....I held my ground, and told him to call the police if he wanted, as we weren't going anywhere. He turned around & left us to enjoy our picnic in peace. The people I was with were ready to jump back in the canoes and bail, & couldn't believe what was happening. So if they know YOU know what the law is, they back off, but it doesn't stop them from trying to intimidate 99% of the people.

Please note, the Strawberry area is forest service leases, the Russian river is private property, so these are two different animals, but the high water mark law is still the same.

P.S. I know a forest service lease holder, and this is fact, not my opinion

FishNChick
12-24-2013, 09:58 PM
In Nevada the riverbed is public property, so you have to be on the bank to be trespassing, but are free to wade up and down the river. Anyone know if that's also true in CA?

I understand this is a little late, but Nevada Riverbed is not Public Property. Only on Navigable Rivers under the COMMERCE act. These include the East Carson, the Carson (after the confluence of the west Carson) portions of the Truckee. A lot of this also is true in California.

You can see them here: Nevada Division of State Lands - State Land Office (http://lands.nv.gov/program/landoffice.htm)

Those rivers that are not listed are only open to the public when they abut Federal or State Lands, but if a private land owner owns the other side, it can be closed on that side, it's up to the private land owner. Rivers that are not on the list, when owned on both sides of the river are closed, if two different property owners, they can close their sides.
This also means you may not walk, be in the river bed, float, tube, kayak down these waters. You can also Check NDOW's website, they also mention this.

Nevada Department of Wildlife (http://www.ndow.org/Bodies_Of_Water/Walker_River_-_East_Fork/)

Nevada Department of Wildlife (http://www.ndow.org/Bodies_Of_Water/Walker_River_-_West_Fork/)

Hope this helps!http://fishsniffervb.thefishsniffer.netdna-cdn.com/images/icons/icon11.png

dirty530
12-26-2013, 03:06 PM
Extent of Public Rights in Navigable and Non-Navigable Rivers
The state acquired title to the navigable waters in its territory upon its admission to the union and the navigable waters and lands lying beneath them are held in trust for the benefit of the people.6) (http://www.americanwhitewater.org/content/Wiki/access:ca#fn__6) This includes all waters navigable in fact.7) (http://www.americanwhitewater.org/content/Wiki/access:ca#fn__7)
California's constitution allows the public to use all navigable waters in the state, and further directs the legislature to give the provision the most liberal construction.8) (http://www.americanwhitewater.org/content/Wiki/access:ca#fn__8) Regardless of whether the streambed of a river which is navigable in fact is public or privately owned, there is an easement for public navigation and the incidents of navigation; i.e. boating, fishing, swimming, hunting and other recreational uses.9) (http://www.americanwhitewater.org/content/Wiki/access:ca#fn__9) The easement exists up to the high water mark.10) (http://www.americanwhitewater.org/content/Wiki/access:ca#fn__10) This right includes the use of the bottom of navigable waters for anchoring, standing, or other purposes.11) (http://www.americanwhitewater.org/content/Wiki/access:ca#fn__11) The public easement, however, does not include the right to use a private pier in navigable water, unless there is an emergency.12) (http://www.americanwhitewater.org/content/Wiki/access:ca#fn__12)
Whether portaging and scouting above the high water mark is permissible has not been definitively ruled upon. In other contexts, however, courts have suggested that an action which would otherwise constitute a trespass may be justified if prompted by the motive of preserving life or property, and if reasonably related to that purpose.13) (http://www.americanwhitewater.org/content/Wiki/access:ca#fn__13)
Courts are especially sensitive to infringements upon the public's constitutional rights under the guise of police power.14) (http://www.americanwhitewater.org/content/Wiki/access:ca#fn__14) The Attorney General found such an infringement when the state sought to prohibit the right to use navigable waters that flowed over inundated privately-owned land adjacent to the navigable waterway.15) (http://www.americanwhitewater.org/content/Wiki/access:ca#fn__15) In a landmark case, the same constitutional provision defeated a county ordinance that forbade rafting on a river because of the litter, pollution, and noise generated by the rafters. Although reasonable regulation was in order, use prohibition was not.16) (http://www.americanwhitewater.org/content/Wiki/access:ca#fn__16) The California Attorney General, however, has opined that government may close navigable waterways to recreational boaters during an emergency, such as flood conditions, when such emergency rules and regulations are required to protect the safety of persons and property.17) (http://www.americanwhitewater.org/content/Wiki/access:ca#fn__17)
There is no right to trespass across private property to access navigable waters.18) (http://www.americanwhitewater.org/content/Wiki/access:ca#fn__18) Where a public road or bridge easement across private property intersects a waterway, however, lawful access to the waterway may be provided. For example, a kayaker was found innocent of trespass where the kayaker was carrying his boat from a county road across private land within the perimeter of the road easement to gain access to a navigable waterway.19) (http://www.americanwhitewater.org/content/Wiki/access:ca#fn__19) In that case, the improved roadway narrowed where a bridge crossed the waterway; nevertheless, the kayaker's use of the entire road easement to access the waterway was reasonable. The County could have imposed or allowed reasonable restrictions on the use of the easement by the public but had not done so.20) (http://www.americanwhitewater.org/content/Wiki/access:ca#fn__20)