PDA

View Full Version : Curious how many of you keep shad?



kneeshefisher
04-30-2013, 11:03 PM
So the people who like to fish for shad... I am curious how many of you actually eat them? With my experience of smoking, they contain a lot of bones.

Me personally, I don't keep them just tried it once. I just like the fight.

BIG_ONE
05-01-2013, 12:26 AM
There's a specific way to cook em'...you'll soon start keeping them once you get it nailed down.
:)

Jimmy_M
05-01-2013, 07:36 AM
BIG_ONE has a few good shad recipes here:
http://www.fishsniffer.com/forums/cookin-your-catch/104406-shad-recipes.html

kneeshefisher
05-01-2013, 08:39 AM
BIG_ONE has a few good shad recipes here:
http://www.fishsniffer.com/forums/cookin-your-catch/104406-shad-recipes.html


:dankk2: Good stuff thanks guys!

rustyhook
05-01-2013, 10:53 AM
If you don't plan on keeping it, please don't throw them on the shore to decay. Every shad season the river bank smells like ****!. Give it to the others around you that enjoy it as table fair.

WhopperStopper
05-01-2013, 11:04 AM
If you don't plan on keeping it, please don't throw them on the shore to decay. Every shad season the river bank smells like ****!. Give it to the others around you that enjoy it as table fair.

Thank you for your post. The odor of rotting shad in the summer sun is horrid. Also if u can't give them away at least throw them back in the water preferably in some current so it gets washed down the river and become part of the food chain. Fyi, they also make great crab bait and Ive heard of guys using them for shark bait. They are also pretty good bait for crawdads.

LURKER916
05-01-2013, 11:31 AM
http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/05/02/ety4e6e8.jpg
Slow cook your shad with plenty of this.

Yummy!

kneeshefisher
05-01-2013, 12:32 PM
If you don't plan on keeping it, please don't throw them on the shore to decay. Every shad season the river bank smells like ****!. Give it to the others around you that enjoy it as table fair.


Why would one purposely catch shad and leave them on shore to rot? Isn't that inhuman and against the law?

westcoastdave
05-01-2013, 01:12 PM
My wife is a Filipina. She actually does'nt like Shad, even though they are just a s bony as the Milkfish she eats all the time. So they go to her friends and relatives, who can't get enough of them. When my mother in law was visiting from the Philippines last year, she went nuts over the shad and made them into all kinds of things. The fish cakes she made them into were delicious.
I have also heard of people using them as crab and sturgeon bait.

dabalone
05-01-2013, 03:18 PM
Why would one purposely catch shad and leave them on shore to rot? Isn't that inhuman and against the law?

It is illegal, called wanton waste and applies to fish as well as animals.

BIG_ONE
05-01-2013, 03:23 PM
1.87. Waste of Fish. It is unlawful to cause or permit any deterioration or waste of any fish taken in the waters of this state.

Freshwater Sport Fishing Regulations - General Provisions and Definitions (http://www.dfg.ca.gov/regulations/FreshFish-Mar2013/ccr-t14-sec1_04-1_93.html)

canuhover
05-01-2013, 05:37 PM
When I was in Florida I watched an old man bone out a tub of shad in about an hour. Took him about 3 min a fish. The shack (more like a lean two) next store sold a boneless shad sandwich for 4 bucks that was awesome.

ilovefishing
05-01-2013, 06:26 PM
It's c&r with me when it comes to shad. But when the family plans a crabbing trip I usually keep a few for bait.

Justin Martell
05-03-2013, 10:49 AM
I release them or give them to someone on the bank/wading who keeps them if they want. I have never eaten them although I am not opposed, just lazy in my culinary arts.

delta916
05-03-2013, 03:28 PM
I caught my first shad on the lower AR when I was 10 years old And have fished them most years since. That's about 40 years of fishing shad. I have never kept shad. I've seen the run go from being able to catch 30-50 fish or more in an evening to trying to scratch out 20 or so. There are definitely a lot fewer shad today then there were even 10 years ago. 20 years ago you'd go home any evening with sore arms from catching so many. A couple of years back I talked to a fellow from Washington State university who was doing shad research on the west coast. He was from back east so was familiar with the shad fishery back there as well. He had never seen, in all his travels observing shad fishing, so many people keeping shad. That makes me wonder how much of an effect all that keeping is having on central valley shad populations. I am sure there is a relationship between the two. I don't fault anyone for keeping shad as long as they stay within the legal limits. The problem is, I feel, the limit is too high. I think a 5-10 fish limit for shad would be more appropriate. I really wonder how long the fishery can sustain with a 25 fish limit and half the anglers keeping fish. when I started fishing shad no one was keeping them and very few people were even fishing them. Now there are a lot of people fishing them(go look at discovery or Freeport or miller this weekend and then sailor bar in another couple of weeks) and half the guys are keeping them. This combined with the problems the delta faces could be bad news for shad. DFW should do something about this.

westcoastdave
05-03-2013, 03:33 PM
Unfortunately American Shad are'nt a native species. And seeing how Fish & Wildlife is nowadays, they won't lift a finger to help out non-native species.

dabalone
05-03-2013, 04:02 PM
It is not a sustainable fishery and will continue to decline from the effects of over fishing, and water conditions which continue to deteriorate. Also, demographics have changed in this valley. We have large populations here that come from countries where fish are just a normal and important part of their diets. But historically even here shad at one time were an important food source simply because of their numbers, large scale farming of animals eliminated that need over time. I do agree shad bag limits need to be in line with other sport fish.

CRABBY
05-03-2013, 04:19 PM
It is not a sustainable fishery and will continue to decline from the effects of over fishing, and water conditions which continue to deteriorate. Also, demographics have changed in this valley. We have large populations here that come from countries where fish are just a normal and important part of their diets. But historically even here shad at one time were an important food source simply because of their numbers, large scale farming of animals eliminated that need over time. I do agree shad bag limits need to be in line with other sport fish.The same thing is true for crappie,bluegill,an all our sunfish an most other fisheries!!Even the babies aren't safe anymore!!An ya wonder why good locations are such a secret.All I'm gonna say!!!:lipsrsealed:

Alosa
05-03-2013, 05:33 PM
A couple of years back I talked to a fellow from Washington State university who was doing shad research on the west coast. He was from back east so was familiar with the shad fishery back there as well. He had never seen, in all his travels observing shad fishing, so many people keeping shad.

Yeah that'sme. I still lurk here.

LURKER916
05-03-2013, 05:40 PM
Just ate my first of the year!

Was awesome! Slow cooked with some good stuff.
http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/05/04/uqe3uja4.jpg

LURKER916
05-03-2013, 05:42 PM
It is not a sustainable fishery and will continue to decline from the effects of over fishing, and water conditions which continue to deteriorate. Also, demographics have changed in this valley. We have large populations here that come from countries where fish are just a normal and important part of their diets. But historically even here shad at one time were an important food source simply because of their numbers, large scale farming of animals eliminated that need over time. I do agree shad bag limits need to be in line with other sport fish.

Dude.
There are thousands and thousands of them. They aren't going anywhere. They couldn't be killed off of fish and game wanted to.

Low waters will affect them but they will adapt and overcome. Head out on the AR and float down it and you will see thousands of fish.

BIG_ONE
05-03-2013, 05:51 PM
If shad goes near extinction, maybe Sacramento Pike Minnow will start to become popular and fisherman may start eating them. Almost the same texture & flavor, with almost as much bones as shad, just not as oily.
:mickey:

IronClad
05-03-2013, 06:03 PM
not sure which one smells worse though LOL

LURKER916
05-03-2013, 06:08 PM
They are stinky fish. Add some fish sauce in the mix and its like a stink bomb went off at my place.

But they taste awesome.

delta916
05-03-2013, 06:15 PM
Yeah that'sme. I still lurk here. So what's your take on the state of the shad fishery and the long term outlook?

delta916
05-03-2013, 06:21 PM
Dude.
There are thousands and thousands of them. They aren't going anywhere. They couldn't be killed off of fish and game wanted to.

Low waters will affect them but they will adapt and overcome. Head out on the AR and float down it and you will see thousands of fish.

Your probably right. Eradication is most likely impossible even if anyone wanted to try. But if you have fished them for any length of time you can see there is a down trend in the population. And that trend will likely continue with more and more people fishing them and keeping them. A more reasonable limit may slow that process down. When you have to go out there and scratch fish for a handful when 20-30 years ago they were plentiful something's gotta give. Shad will always be here but in what numbers is up to us.

LURKER916
05-03-2013, 07:07 PM
Good point Delta.

Alosa
05-03-2013, 09:03 PM
So what's your take on the state of the shad fishery and the long term outlook?

It's really hard to say. We don't have alot of data on the adult population size or the factors that influence the population abundance. Angler anecdotal evidence is useful, but subjective. I don't doubt that there's been a downward trend in abundance in the American River, but we also know that flow and temperature affects the spawning run, so without considering environmental variation at the same time, it's difficult to say if its an ACTUAL decrease in abundance, or simply a redistribution of shad to other regions of the watershed (Feather, Sacramento, San Joaquin, etc.).

delta916
05-03-2013, 10:24 PM
It's really hard to say. We don't have alot of data on the adult population size or the factors that influence the population abundance. Angler anecdotal evidence is useful, but subjective. I don't doubt that there's been a downward trend in abundance in the American River, but we also know that flow and temperature affects the spawning run, so without considering environmental variation at the same time, it's difficult to say if its an ACTUAL decrease in abundance, or simply a redistribution of shad to other regions of the watershed (Feather, Sacramento, San Joaquin, etc.).Absolutely angler info is purely subjective but I think most will agree that adult numbers are down everywhere compared to what they were even 10 years ago. I believe there is data out there when it comes to young of the year shad. There have been several articles concerning long term trends of delta smelt and salmon. It seems like I read somewhere that the same studies which DFG does to monitor species like those also captures data on shad. Some of those studies have decades of information. I guess I'll have to look it has to be on line somewhere.

BIG_ONE
05-03-2013, 10:37 PM
not sure which one smells worse though LOL

I never like to have any left overs of shad if it's not battered. Any left overs with shad on a slow bake, take out from the fridge the following day and heat it up. It's got to be the most fishy smell I have ever experienced compared to any other fish.
In terms of studying these American Shad, there is no real science behind it. They have no idea where they go after the spawning run on any river system. At least to my knowledge and my extent of research...

Alosa
05-04-2013, 06:53 AM
They have no idea where they go after the spawning run on any river system. At least to my knowledge and my extent of research...

There's one paper that came out in Fishery Bulletin a couple of years ago that documented there movements along the coast using NOAA fishery surveys.

dabalone
05-04-2013, 07:08 AM
I agree mostly subjective, I don't think a lot of time, effort and money have gone towards the study of American shad so the science may be lacking. But as fishermen we have a good sense of fish populations we target and declines don't happen overnight they happen over time. Many of us have been fishing this valley for 40, 50 years and have a good feel for changes over a longer period of time.

Alosa makes a good point in that shad populations may have shifted their distribution through the system. Hard to say without science to back it up but some of our traditional shad haunts on both the upper Sac and Feather do not produce the numbers and action they did just 10 years ago. River structure is still the same, depth, flows etc. but as a fisherman we know its not like it used to be. Also, numbers may be deceiving, I think you have to look at how long are the runs lasting, are you getting just one, two, three pushes of fish?

I also think shad have been for the most part overlooked as a food fish but that seems to be changing. It just does not make sense to have a 25 fish bag limit on a sportfish so many look forward to catching every year and is now being looked at more and more as a source of protein. Having said this I still defend peoples rights to do what they choose if they are following the law.

walkndogblues
05-04-2013, 11:25 AM
Why would you do that must be the same guys who use small hooks for stripers and catch a bunch of small ones rip the hooks out because they don't want to lose that cheep hook and then throw the fish in to die I see this too much, these people are missing the idea of what fishing is about.:carlo5wu:

Justin Martell
05-06-2013, 01:33 PM
I think that as long as people are within the law they can do what they want as well. But I do have to say that 25 does seem like a lot. I have fallen in love with going after these ornery little fish over the last couple years and hate to hear anything like their numbers are dwindling and whatnot. But hey if people are eating them then more power to them. I mean that is what got this whole "fishing" thing started way back when anyways right? Maybe release females? I don't know, just leave some for me!!! :smiley: