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ryanv829
06-05-2013, 09:01 PM
Just got back from a quick overnight trip w my girlfriend to glacier lake. Got lost and never made it to our destination, but we were able to fish some other lakes along the trail. Landed some nice rainbows and brookies. Weather was nice and other than her 40+ mosquito bites my girlfriend really enjoyed the fishing. Met a guy on the trail who had been lost for 2 days. I definetely need to invest in a gps. Heres a pic of one of the brookies. The rainbows were bigger but i love the colors on this one.
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CAL.NDN
06-05-2013, 09:28 PM
Good to hear everyone is safe. Beautiful fish.

stingray4540
06-06-2013, 01:59 AM
Jealousy doesn't seem adiquate to describe my fealing towards this thread. Nice fish!

What's with everyone getting lost lately? How about that other guy, you help him get his bearings?

ryanv829
06-06-2013, 07:50 AM
Jealousy doesn't seem adiquate to describe my fealing towards this thread. Nice fish!

What's with everyone getting lost lately? How about that other guy, you help him get his bearings?

I ran into him at the trailhead, he was just getting back as I was starting. But the trails were not well marked at all and there were a lot of little side trails that threw me off. That guy had a gps too.

RideNfish
06-06-2013, 08:40 AM
Nice trip except for the lost part. I hear of people getting lost with gps all the time. And the gps unit can fail. Everyone hiking back country should have a good topical map of the area and a compass. Then take a class on how to use them together.

Brooks look so cool and they do get big. Thanks for sharing.

atavuss
06-06-2013, 12:12 PM
Nice trip except for the lost part. I hear of people getting lost with gps all the time. And the gps unit can fail. Everyone hiking back country should have a good topical map of the area and a compass. Then take a class on how to use them together.

Brooks look so cool and they do get big. Thanks for sharing.
The paper map and compass idea is a good one, who gives classes on how to use them?

Jfitalia
06-06-2013, 02:29 PM
The paper map and compass idea is a good one, who gives classes on how to use them?


I believe REI does

toomanyhobbies
06-06-2013, 07:45 PM
Sorry to hear about the getting lost part. Your trip sounds eerily familiar to mine last weekend in Desolation. Glad to hear you made the best of it as well. I was very happy to have my map and compass with me when we lost the trail. We never needed it but i never backpack without them. It certainly provides great piece of mind and i've never seen the batteries die on a compass.

RideNfish
06-06-2013, 08:24 PM
The paper map and compass idea is a good one, who gives classes on how to use them?

I'm sure some community colleges do and places like Jeremy said. Matter of fact there are thousands of online sites for it. One of the first links in a google search is REI (good one Jeremy).

Here you go click here for a search (https://www.google.com/search?client=gmail&rls=gm&q=topical%20map#client=gmail&rls=gm&biw=1696&bih=911&sclient=psy-ab&q=how+to+use+a+compass+and+topo+map&oq=how+to+use+a+compass+and+&gs_l=serp.3.0.0l4.42169446.42174059.0.42176611.27. 19.1.1.1.1.438.3916.0j3j6j4j1.14.0...0.0...1c.1.16 .psy-ab.CzhJe8XYcKM&pbx=1&bav=on.2,or.r_qf.&bvm=bv.47534661,d.aWM&fp=85e440c1310b44c5).

Treebeard
06-08-2013, 01:02 PM
A long time ago, maybe 1980, the company I worked for expanded into adjacent office space that had been abandoned by a surveying company, and they left all the furniture for us to use. I got a small office of my own, with windows and its own door to the outside. But cooler yet was the 2 Thommen pocket altimeters in the top drawer of my new desk! I tried to give them back but nobody wanted them... and I think they were worth about $300 each back then - now I see them for $400-$500 plus a good chunk if change for the leather case.

I don't get lost in the Sierra, map or no; but I always carry a map and compass just in case - even if I don't need them I frequently run across people who do (and some of them are willing to admit it. Having the altimeter took me from "little chance" of getting lost to "no chance". Here's why:

If you are carrying a topo map, with compass or not, it's pretty easy to tell your general position especially if you are on a trail that is marked on the map. If it isn't foggy or snowing or whatever you may be able to correlate the topo with your visual field - if you have good visual/spatial skills. You can then see that you are "sort of somewhere about here" on the map, and of course sometimes you can do much better than that.

But if you have an accurate altimeter, you can pinpoint your location on the topo. The Thommen I had was accurate to 30 feet elevation. Topo maps come in different contour intervals, but 60' is pretty common... so your elevation is known within 1/2 of a contour.
If I know I'm "sort of somewhere about here" on the trail, all I need to do is find where the trail intersects with the topo line closest to the altimeter reading - and now I know "I am here".
:grin:
And the altimeter doesn't care if it's a white-out blizzard or pea-soup fog, or if you're sitting on a south-facing rock ledge with an overhang that blocks the GPS signal...

Unfortunately I am much better at finding my way than keeping track of my equipment, so I eventually passed mine on to another hiker...

I found instructions for the Thommen here (http://www.perret-optic.ch/instruments/Loisirs-et_marche/altimetre/altimetre_thommen_Mode_emplois/Thommen_altimetre-gb1.pdf).

TB
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hooks
06-08-2013, 05:57 PM
Or, if you are putting yourself in a position frequently that you may get lost or even injured maybe, you could get a SPOT personal tracker. It can even be shared between friends. If you get lost or injured to the point you can't get out, just push the button. Help is on the way.

piscolabis
06-09-2013, 03:06 AM
So . . . where is Glacier Lake? Does anyone know where it is and how to get there? Does this lake really exist? Is this a truly phantom location?

IronClad
06-09-2013, 03:23 AM
So . . . where is Glacier Lake? Does anyone know where it is and how to get there? Does this lake really exist? Is this a truly phantom location?

Looks real enough Google Maps (http://goo.gl/maps/Xn8Xa) as far as getting there... i couldnt even begin to tell you as ive never been

Treebeard
06-09-2013, 07:21 AM
I just had to try:

Google does trails, too! (https://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=CA-20+W&daddr=glacier+lake,+Tahoe+National+Forest&hl=en&ll=39.339608,-120.631256&spn=0.095059,0.154324&sll=39.305745,-120.636578&sspn=0.095105,0.154324&geocode=FS28VwIdWLvO-A%3BFTsrWQIdUXHQ-Ck9KBnmZY2bgDESAE7ZeTWPPw&t=h&mra=dme&mrsp=0&sz=13&z=13)


but I didn't have time to see if it's a reasonable route... or even if it's assuming 4wd or boots or bare feet... it does look like it doesn't quite get you there though.

TB

FresnoJack
06-09-2013, 09:33 AM
Join the Marine Corps and ask for assignment to Force Recon? grin

The compass has many advantages over GPS - they work just fine when wet, they always point North and South, and the batteries never die.

Check with the Fresno REI store. Herb Bauer's has backpacking classes,

The Sierra Foothill Conservancy has orienteering classes right out of Tollhouse along the San Joaquin. Cost is about $15.00. Fresno 559.855.3473. They also have a Mariposa office 209.742.5556.

The Recreation Administration Department at Fresno State has a 1-unit orienteering course from time to time. 559.278.2838.

Check out Adult Ed programs offered through your local school districts.

The best book on the subject: "Be Expert with Map and Compass" by Björn Kjellström. ISBN: 9780470407653.

I still have the original 1955 edition. I picked up the latest edition at Barnes and Noble and it is updated with all the GPS, WWW stuff.



The paper map and compass idea is a good one, who gives classes on how to use them?

NRJohn
06-10-2013, 01:23 PM
Sometimes the trails just aren't very well marked. I was at Secret Lake a couple of weeks ago. I knew that there were 3 trails to get back to the meadow. One I'd taken and didn't want to go back that way. The middle one was the one that I wanted. Yet according to my map I had to go past Secret to the west and it would hit the trail. I even talked to a guy that pointed me in the direction. However, the trail that we would have taken was the same one I was on to get to Poore and I knew damn well that there was no intersecting trail.

When we got back to Secret (I made a U turn when we realized where the trail was going to take us) the guy was suprised we were back and again pointed were the trail was. Just as we were getting ready to take the trail I didn't want to take back, a couple of guys came by. I asked if they were headed for Leavitt and if we could tag along. They said sure and proceeded to the trail head. Funny thing though the trail had was not were my map showed nor were the guy head pointed me out to. It was literally no more than 10 yards from where he was camping and not even marked! So off we went and was surprised at the route we took back to the meadow. It was nothing like my map showed.

Now we were never lost but it sure felt that way sometimes. Damn trail was hard to pick up at times and not just at the lake but on the way down to Poore and back up. Good thing my daughter has a nose for tracking and hiking lol!

Treebeard
06-10-2013, 08:13 PM
Good thing my daughter has a nose for tracking and hiking lol!
Yes, there's nothing as valuable as good "trail sense", as long as you're able to see about. And you don't develop that sense by always using instrumentation, though the hardware is good to get you going and invaluable in an emergency. In my opinion the biggesst potential killer/preventer of novices developing good trail sense is - and please take note of the modifier that begins this term - excessive trail marker ducks, cairns, little rock piles, whatever you call them; especially in wilderness areas. That's all I better say, we're far enough off-topic already with the map and compass...

:sling8tx: TB