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flasher
06-18-2013, 09:42 AM
Hi to all other north river boat owners. I am hoping you can help me with my problem. When fishing alone, and bringing boat into dock the wind is sometimes my worst enemy. I need some Ideas to help land when I am fishing alone. I have the north river ez loader boat trailer, but the boat seems to walk onto the trailer from side to side which make it impossible for one person. I have found that loading by hand is easiest and fastest way. thanks in advance Scott

striperking13
06-18-2013, 03:55 PM
I say to be safe, u should always find at least one friend to tag along. So much can happen out there, if it was in a lake or river it wouldn't be to bad. But out in the ocean, for me, i usually like another person to tag along.. As far as docking, its tuff when the wind is blowing even with another person. The best thing is get use to your boat and know how it responds in every situation. Sometimes you just gotta come in wider and let the wind push u into the trailer. For me, i always try to go in a little faster so i have more control of the boat. But that's just me... FISH ON

49erbassman
06-18-2013, 05:23 PM
I'll offer help for a day on the water lol


Fish on!

jlivengood
06-18-2013, 07:42 PM
Hi to all other north river boat owners. I am hoping you can help me with my problem. When fishing alone, and bringing boat into dock the wind is sometimes my worst enemy. I need some Ideas to help land when I am fishing alone. I have the north river ez loader boat trailer, but the boat seems to walk onto the trailer from side to side which make it impossible for one person. I have found that loading by hand is easiest and fastest way. thanks in advance Scott

Hi Scott - what year is your North River? The trailer I have with mine will automatically center the boat if I don't pull in to deep. I can hit my trailer at 45 degrees as long as I get the bow in, then let it settle and magic it centers. Trim the motor up and the drive right up to the stop. I have been very impressed but have a new boat so maybe there is some difference in the trailers.

drinkinbuddy
06-18-2013, 08:08 PM
Hi Scott - what year is your North River? The trailer I have with mine will automatically center the boat if I don't pull in to deep. I can hit my trailer at 45 degrees as long as I get the bow in, then let it settle and magic it centers. Trim the motor up and the drive right up to the stop. I have been very impressed but have a new boat so maybe there is some difference in the trailers.


Your trailer is like mine jlivengood but I own a sea ray 190. What you need is practice and go in just a little faster. Maybe try varying the depth of your trailer until you find the sweet spot. Practice, practice, practice, which also means more fishing. Lol. I go out solo so I had to get good at it. Now I can drop my boat and pull it out faster than some just pulling theirs out. Don't want to be like the other weekend warriors who take up valuable time at the ramp. Keep at it, you will get it.

Drinkinbuddy

salmonid
06-18-2013, 08:57 PM
Any pics of your trailer? That would be helpful.

My trailer has side guides that get the boat centered even if I'm off course a bit. I can also use the side guides for maneuvering around- as in pushing against the guide and turning the boat if fighting wind or currents.

Best,

flasher
06-19-2013, 02:05 AM
thanks to all replies! looks like a trip with a friend and spend more time getting it right before my next solo trip. Drinkinbuddy is right "practice practice practice" thanks again - scott

PeliKen
06-19-2013, 06:21 AM
Flasher, A little trick I learned while trying to trailer my boat in the river might help. The wind, like the river current, causes the boat to slide sideways when approaching the trailer. To counter this you obviously have to steer slightly into the wind. You end up a with a boat whose centerline is not aligned with your heading. The trick is to angle your trailer to help compensate. It is not a complete cure but it sure helps. Just be sure to pick the correct side of the dock so your trailer is cocked away from it.

dabalone
06-19-2013, 03:18 PM
If you fish alone often I suggest having side bunks installed, some trailers just are not friendly to the solo boater and I experienced the same problems with wind and current. Practice will help a lot but I had custom side bunks installed. Piece a cake after that even if you are out of position they will straighten you out and made trailering quick with just one person. Didn't have a North river but side bunks will work for most any boat.

jlivengood
06-19-2013, 03:43 PM
thanks to all replies! looks like a trip with a friend and spend more time getting it right before my next solo trip. Drinkinbuddy is right "practice practice practice" thanks again - scott

I think the trick is the depth of the trailer in the water and drinkinbuddy was spot on when suggested trying different depths till you find the sweet spot. According to the dealer I got mine from, and he took me out to the lake to show me, if the back of the boat is still floating once your trailer before you pull out then the trailer is too deep!

Good luck,

Jim

salmonid
06-19-2013, 05:05 PM
Yeah, the depth of the trailer is key for me too. Different ramps have different grades so I go by how far my back guides are sticking out of the water rather than the water line to say my back truck tires. It's so easy even my guests can back up my rig (if they are capable) until about 1 or 2 inches are showing on the back guides. Then I power load the boat on the trailer.

Best,

redneckpunk
06-19-2013, 07:00 PM
I know most have already said it, but depth, depth, depth. I have learned that my boat loads best if I first back in until the bunks are almost totally submerged to wet them. I then pull out until the forward 18-20in of bunks are out of the water and she will power on or winch on within an inch of center everytime.

Couple tips I have seen from different guys is to mark the trailer at the right depth once you find it. For example, I've seen a trailer with a line painter on the front side of the fender wells indicating how far to back in. Another I say was a stripe painted in the carpet on the bunks. Of course depending on how steep the ramp is these will vary slightly. Or if youve ever launched at a crooked ramp, such as King Island, its all guess work but at least you still have an idea where you need to be

~RNP

Line Stretcher
06-19-2013, 07:17 PM
Depth is the key as has been stated again and again. I have a guess mark on my fender and when the water hits that mark I'm good.

Elsancho
07-24-2013, 08:57 PM
I have a 22 ft commander, and the thing that works for me is not backing the trailer into the water as much and the boat pretty much centers itself. I run a jet so I don't know if it is as easy with a prop. If there is wind or current try nosing up wind/stream then center the nose at the last second. Good luck I'm sure with some practice u will get the hang of it.

yonnr2000
03-16-2014, 09:20 PM
I have a 20 foot North River Seahawk that I frequently launch and retrieve by myself. Before I launch, I double check that all the ties are removed, the bumper bouys are in their proper place, and that the front and rear docking lines are placed on the gunwale so that they are easily reachable from the dock(ALSO THAT THE BOAT PLUG IS IN). When backing down, I try to be close enough to the dock where I can easily step in to the boat from the dock but far enough from the dock that I can open the driver side door of my truck. As soon as I notice that the boat is starting to float, I quickly get out of my truck, walk onto the dock, grab the front and rear docking lines and pull the boat back out of the trailer and then secure the lines to the dock cleats. Sometimes I have to get into the boat and use the outboard motor to pull the boat out of the trailer because I didn't back the trailer into the water enough.

When retrieving my boat, I secure my boat to the dock and then back my trailer into the water leaving a couple of inches of the carpeted bunks above the water. I then drive the boat onto the trailer as slow as possible . The exposed bunks will prevent me from hitting the winch post. When my boat comes to a stop, I make left or right turn adjustments with the motor to make sure I'm centered and then give a little throttle to push my boat further into the trailer. I then step onto the trailer (I have a spare tire mounted on the winch post which makes getting down from the boat easier) and then use the winch to pull the boat maybe 6inches to a foot more into the final position. I then take a step or two down the trailer tongue onto my rear bumper, side step while holding on to the roof rack of my Chevy Tahoe and using the rear tire as step and then step down on to dry land.

Hope this was helpful.

Ronny