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View Full Version : Land Locked Pacific Ocean Rainbow Trout.



Line Stretcher
07-31-2013, 06:45 PM
There are only a couple of places on the earth that you can catch these fish. The fact that they even exist is truly a gift from the heavens.

As you all know I fish for these fish and I do it in a manner that is in alignment with the current conservation efforts.

There are some that have not read the regs and fish our lakes with these treasures not knowing that they are not a normal rainbow trout but instead they are what are commonly referred to as Steelhead trout. At lake Sonoma, Ca. the limit is two. The fact that there is no possession limit does not mean that there is no possession limit to the number you can possess it means that the limit is two no matter where you have them.

Catch and release is proven to be a good thing if you stay within the daily limit. I don't think it was ever intended to be an excuse for catching 2 or 3 times the daily limit. However, it has become increasingly common to believe that you can in fact catch all the fish you want if you are a good sportsman and you release them all.

That belief would be valid if all the fish you release survived. They don't. Studies have proven that on average, only 54% survive and the remaining 46% will die. For the sake of simplifying the math, lets just call it 50/50.

My personal practice when I fish for these fish is catch and keep or keep one and release one. Why, well if I only want to keep one and I release the other there's a 50/50 chance it's going to die. If you quit after two then the 50/50 odds aren't to bad and I can live with that. It's still within the predicted conservation levels which are based on estimated fish numbers versus food supply for the body of water.

Where it goes upside down on us is when people that think they're doing the right thing, catch well over the daily limits. The 50/50 survival rate is now totally out of whack. Last year there were several people reporting C/R stats of 30 fish per day. If the 50/50 rule is even remotely close then those fisherman went well over the conservation level and were into the area that causes fish like these to become endangered.

Last year I complained to DFG about the amount of dead fish showing up around the ramp area. I was convinced then and I still believe that these were the product of catch and release.

Many people on this board thought I was nuts and mistook those fish for fish that someone dumped at the dock. I think the truth is now evident by the numbers of fish in the lake this year. They are way down from last year, in fact, the fish are now being planted upstream in the creeks because of the low numbers. These plants are in compliance with recent laws and the fish are genetically identical to the fish that are naturally in the lake.

I think it's sad to find that once again we've nearly destroyed another fishery and in this case it's even worse since this was such a rare and beautiful opportunity to do the right thing and we blew it.

This post is intended to be educational. I'm not on a pulpit preaching catch and keep or anything else for that matter. You folks can make up your own mind about how you want to interpret it.

All I ask is that you simply take a few moments to think about what's been said in this post.

rainbowkiller
07-31-2013, 06:59 PM
So for clarification purposes are you referring the 50/50 statistics for trout or all fish in general? I do agree with a sensitive species that is often mis handled durring catch and release, trout should only be caught with the intentto harvest. obviously the bag limit should be considered and harvest should be within compliance. In my opinion and experience other that a fish coming unbuttoned durring retrieval they do actually kill over rather quickly and at lest viewed by me, would be the same as over harvesting. A dead fish is one less in the fishery and should be counted as part of your bag limit. Example 5 fish caught and released is the same as 5 fish harvested. I see people cull trout which cannot be healthy practice at all. Either way people will poach and fish will die. Do you have a proposal to conservation of these fish as I am willing to lend a voluntary hand to preserve our fisheries.

Line Stretcher
07-31-2013, 07:20 PM
So for clarification purposes are you referring the 50/50 statistics for trout or all fish in general? I do agree with a sensitive species that is often mis handled durring catch and release, trout should only be caught with the intentto harvest. obviously the bag limit should be considered and harvest should be within compliance. In my opinion and experience other that a fish coming unbuttoned durring retrieval they do actually kill over rather quickly and at lest viewed by me, would be the same as over harvesting. A dead fish is one less in the fishery and should be counted as part of your bag limit. Example 5 fish caught and released is the same as 5 fish harvested. I see people cull trout which cannot be healthy practice at all. Either way people will poach and fish will die. Do you have a proposal to conservation of these fish as I am willing to lend a voluntary hand to preserve our fisheries.

Thanks, my proposals last year were virtually ignored but now they are planting. What I need help with is educating others and doing it in a manner that just makes people think rather than trying to force their hand. Education is far more effective if you can simply trigger the thought process. I typically like to educate at the dock when the opportunity occurs. I don't force myself on people. I prefer to educate while in casual conversation and in an understanding manner. It's important to listen to peoples responses and know when to back off or often agree when you don't. You'll still get the thought in their head and with a little luck it will take hold.

rainbowkiller
08-01-2013, 03:22 AM
Couldn't have said it better myself..

hooks
08-01-2013, 07:16 AM
There are only a couple of places on the earth that you can catch these fish. The fact that they even exist is truly a gift from the heavens.

As you all know I fish for these fish and I do it in a manner that is in alignment with the current conservation efforts.

There are some that have not read the regs and fish our lakes with these treasures not knowing that they are not a normal rainbow trout but instead they are what are commonly referred to as Steelhead trout. At lake Sonoma, Ca. the limit is two. The fact that there is no possession limit does not mean that there is no possession limit to the number you can possess it means that the limit is two no matter where you have them.

Catch and release is proven to be a good thing if you stay within the daily limit. I don't think it was ever intended to be an excuse for catching 2 or 3 times the daily limit. However, it has become increasingly common to believe that you can in fact catch all the fish you want if you are a good sportsman and you release them all.

That belief would be valid if all the fish you release survived. They don't. Studies have proven that on average, only 54% survive and the remaining 46% will die. For the sake of simplifying the math, lets just call it 50/50.

My personal practice when I fish for these fish is catch and keep or keep one and release one. Why, well if I only want to keep one and I release the other there's a 50/50 chance it's going to die. If you quit after two then the 50/50 odds aren't to bad and I can live with that. It's still within the predicted conservation levels which are based on estimated fish numbers versus food supply for the body of water.

Where it goes upside down on us is when people that think they're doing the right thing, catch well over the daily limits. The 50/50 survival rate is now totally out of whack. Last year there were several people reporting C/R stats of 30 fish per day. If the 50/50 rule is even remotely close then those fisherman went well over the conservation level and were into the area that causes fish like these to become endangered.

Last year I complained to DFG about the amount of dead fish showing up around the ramp area. I was convinced then and I still believe that these were the product of catch and release.

Many people on this board thought I was nuts and mistook those fish for fish that someone dumped at the dock. I think the truth is now evident by the numbers of fish in the lake this year. They are way down from last year, in fact, the fish are now being planted upstream in the creeks because of the low numbers. These plants are in compliance with recent laws and the fish are genetically identical to the fish that are naturally in the lake.

I think it's sad to find that once again we've nearly destroyed another fishery and in this case it's even worse since this was such a rare and beautiful opportunity to do the right thing and we blew it.

This post is intended to be educational. I'm not on a pulpit preaching catch and keep or anything else for that matter. You folks can make up your own mind about how you want to interpret it.

All I ask is that you simply take a few moments to think about what's been said in this post.

OK, I'll think about it.

I never have caught or even fished for these "land locked rainbows"...steelhead anywhere. If I make a trip to Lake Sanoma it's going to be for a hog hunting trip, not fishing.

One thing though...could you please define "catch"?

Isn't this the reason that these land locked rainbows came into existence?

http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s288/hooks-pic/picture_zps3f49d901.jpg


Where are we headed with this? From being able to catch 10 trout, 20 in possession and go home, down to 5 trout 10 in possession. To catch and release. Now we have waters that are catch and release with zero take. I don't know man? It seems to me that if one is genuinely
concerned about the welfare of fish in these troubled areas that they would leave them alone in the first place?

Line Stretcher
08-01-2013, 08:58 AM
In order to understand it you first must understand the need for conservation. Conservation is all about maintaining a healthy habitat for all the species in the lake not just the one. In the case of Lake Sonoma, because it's an artificial habitat, it's an attempt to do what nature was never prepared to do.

The idea is to control the populations of species so that they all have adequate resources to insure continued existence. When the population of one species drops significantly it is often human error that causes it. Unfortunately the species that is out of balance leaves more than adequate resources for the other species who may then over populate the lake and force the other into extinction.

Defining catch - Catch is the act of restraining something. The method of restraint varies from trapping it in a pond to convincing it to hook itself. The hooking method can often result in a fight for survival in which the stronger opponent usually wins by tiring the other until they give up.

The ability of the exhausted fish to be released back into the wild and survive depends on many factors. Pacific Ocean Rainbow Trout have a comfort zone of between 56 and 59 degrees we think. Lakes that have surface temps somewhere around 65 degrees will begin to pull the oxygen up from the depths. When the surface temps reach around 70 degrees this particular fish is not going to hang around long but the water temps they prefer are at a depth where the oxygen is now extremely depleted.

These fish may appear fine as they swim away but they are still exhausted and have depleted the energy and oxygen that they've stored. Their first instinct is to get out of the hot water to a place where they are comfortable so they swim down to the depths. When they get there, the oxygen levels are too low to regenerate their needs and they can't generate enough air to fill their bladders. The result is that 46% of the time, they suffocate and sink to the bottom.

Side note added: Bass do not have the ability to burp like a trout does. They assimilate the oxygen in their bladders back out through their blood stream. The risk with bass is that you release one that is exhausted with a full bladder and it floats on the surface and dies. A trout that floats after release will often burp off the air in their bladder if they have the energy. Ironically the instinct to get out of the warm water will cause them to expend nearly all their energy to burp and they end up sinking to the bottom and dyeing from lack of oygen.

Just to be clear, we believe that this occurs about 46% of the time. The other 54% of the time the fish make it.

Rugby Lock
08-01-2013, 12:24 PM
So does it matter what the species of fish it is for the 54/46 split with c&r?

Line Stretcher
08-01-2013, 12:32 PM
So does it matter what the species of fish it is for the 54/46 split with c&r?

I do not know the answer to that. The studies I've been reading are in reference to our native trout species.