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rainbowkiller
08-06-2013, 11:12 PM
This has me pondering?? What do you guys do? Currently I'm facing a man made lake with extremely low wate (for maintenance). Now the lake as far as I can see is 3ft deep tops. But I can't see any catchable size fish but I know they are in there. Bass to catfish. My assumption is the fish are somewhere in deeper water? How would you go about searching for the deeper water??? Thanks in advance

salmonid
08-06-2013, 11:24 PM
Can't help too much I guess since I'm boating it mostly... but it's the same maybe?

Is it a reservoir? look for the old river bed. Even if it isn't look for the grade/angles of the banks, they will continue under the water for a ways at least. Maybe check google maps and look for the deep water there, I know it works for rivers anyway, they will appear darker. If all of that fails, you can cast a lure or weight around and get an idea at least. I used a cast-able depth finder for a season, but they failed to work after a few outings for me- but that's another option.

Best,

BaitMaster
08-07-2013, 06:54 AM
Lucky for you the guys across the pond have bank angling down to a science. I learned a lot watching carp fishing videos on youtube.

They call it a marker float rig, or "plumbing the depth". Its basically a sliding weight on your main line and a bobber attached to the very end.

Cast it out, let it sink, reel the bobber to the weight and then strip off a foot of line at a time until the bobber surfaces. Now you know how deep it is there! By dragging the weight on the bottom with a sensitive pole, you can map out mentally what type of bottom structure or compositions you're working with, etc...

They utilize their line clips a lot too from what i've seen. Found a sweet spot? Clip your line, rig up and cast back out....Your line clip will stop the line. I just rely on accuracy and memory, but some of those guys are launching their baits clear across pay to fish ponds with 12' rods and are limited to the one spot, so i guess it makes sense.

rainbowkiller
08-07-2013, 04:18 PM
Lucky for you the guys across the pond have bank angling down to a science. I learned a lot watching carp fishing videos on youtube.

They call it a marker float rig, or "plumbing the depth". Its basically a sliding weight on your main line and a bobber attached to the very end.

Cast it out, let it sink, reel the bobber to the weight and then strip off a foot of line at a time until the bobber surfaces. Now you know how deep it is there! By dragging the weight on the bottom with a sensitive pole, you can map out mentally what type of bottom structure or compositions you're working with, etc...

They utilize their line clips a lot too from what i've seen. Found a sweet spot? Clip your line, rig up and cast back out....Your line clip will stop the line. I just rely on accuracy and memory, but some of those guys are launching their baits clear across pay to fish ponds with 12' rods and are limited to the one spot, so i guess it makes sense.

This is awesome!!!!! Great idea definitely gotta try this. See for me knowing depths keeps me hooking big cats in trout season. I like to find deep holes then fishing them in the winter. Also hold over trout in the summer as well as bass and big big bluegills

Line Stretcher
08-07-2013, 05:11 PM
Of course you could always use the old conventional method and throw rocks. The deeper the water the faster the ripples. Just throw a rock in a known shallow water area first and use it as a reference. Rock size doesn't effect speed but it will affect the distance between the ripples so use rocks that make it easiest to read.

For you nay sayer's here's a reference for you: Ripple tank - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ripple_tank)

My dad used this method for years and it does work.

reeltor
08-07-2013, 05:40 PM
Seems like a good topo map of the lake along with your GPS to give you your elevation and location would show any deep water in the vicinity...

Line Stretcher
08-08-2013, 09:29 AM
Seems like a good topo map of the lake along with your GPS to give you your elevation and location would show any deep water in the vicinity...

Topo's would have to be older versions before the lake was formed. They don't include bathy info and you have to know current surface elevation in order to find the holes.

A float tube or a yak would be the ticket I think.

FresnoJack
08-08-2013, 02:40 PM
Here is a link to a video showing how to set up and use a marker float.
Marker Floats (http://informativefisherman.com/user/portal.php?tab=member&sub=0&video=g-MmKZty22g)

You can find the depth and drop-offs. You can also feel the bottom type.

I use slip bobbers a lot and this technique allows me to keep a bait floating just above the bottom.


Lucky for you the guys across the pond have bank angling down to a science. I learned a lot watching carp fishing videos on youtube.

They call it a marker float rig, or "plumbing the depth". Its basically a sliding weight on your main line and a bobber attached to the very end.

Cast it out, let it sink, reel the bobber to the weight and then strip off a foot of line at a time until the bobber surfaces. Now you know how deep it is there! By dragging the weight on the bottom with a sensitive pole, you can map out mentally what type of bottom structure or compositions you're working with, etc...

They utilize their line clips a lot too from what i've seen. Found a sweet spot? Clip your line, rig up and cast back out....Your line clip will stop the line. I just rely on accuracy and memory, but some of those guys are launching their baits clear across pay to fish ponds with 12' rods and are limited to the one spot, so i guess it makes sense.