PDA

View Full Version : might be dumb question....anchoring, why so much line?



hrairguitar
08-26-2013, 12:02 PM
Forgive me if this is a dumb question. Still learning here....but anchoring....why do you let out so much line? If the water is 15 ft deep then why not let out just enough til it hits the bottom and tie it off? What are the benefits of letting out so much rope or disadvantages of not letting out enough?

Marv
08-26-2013, 12:11 PM
In a lake that's fine on a calm day. In current you need more because the current pulls on your boat and you angle away from your anchor. Your anchors stays put and you get pulled with the current so instead of 10' down it's going 3' back and 7' down.

Plus if you wanna fish a hole, you can anchor above and drift up over the hole. So you don't drop anchor in the hole.

AnglingWes
08-26-2013, 12:20 PM
You need enough slack to absorb the 6' wake from all the yahoos on the river.

fishnmike
08-26-2013, 12:23 PM
Its the physics of how an anchor works. Anchors don't work by weighting your boat down, they work by digging into the bottom so you need to let out enough rope to allow the anchor to have an angle on the bottom so it can dig in. Also having 10 feet of chain will really help. In shallow water you can sometimes get away with 2 times the amount of rope out than it is deep. The deeper the water gets and the faster the current gets the more rope you need. Also if the bottom is hard you need more rope out. Some places I fish in the bay or lower Delta I may let out a 4 to 1 rope ratio.

Line Stretcher
08-26-2013, 01:39 PM
FishinMike, your answer is the way I was taught also. On my 22' boat I only carry a 10lb Hooker with 6' of chain and 100' rode. On my drift boat I carry two 30lb pyramids.

There are as many Anchor types as there are ways to anchor up but a short rode will almost always fail in anything other than a farm pond.

As was mentioned before about the boat wakes, if you do manage a fairly solid hook on a short rode and that boat wake comes along you can bet you're going to get wet and possibly sink if it hits broadside.

On a river there's many ways to anchor. Most real drift boats are designed to anchor from the stern and are equipped with quick release systems. Don't do that with a normal transom boat or your setting up a recipe for disaster.

On rivers, myself and many others I know use as small a diameter rode as possible and prefer basic cotton rope that cuts easily. We always have a sharp knife at the ready too. Consider using a pyramid style anchor for rivers. I consider them disposable and that's why I carry two in the drift boat.

Hamachi_Kama
08-26-2013, 01:50 PM
I believe the term is called scoping the anchor line.

Line Stretcher
08-26-2013, 02:00 PM
I believe the term is called scoping the anchor line.

And I believe you to be 100% correct!:wink:

hrairguitar
08-26-2013, 02:50 PM
ok so im trying to follow along here....

So i have a 16 ft bass/speed boat looking type of boat

The anchor i have is a 15 pound river anchor with 50 ft of line and the $15 anchor chain (wally mart'd). The chain seems to only be about 5-6 feet if that. Sounds like my chain is too small and i need a longer rope

Now do you all use 1 anchor or 2? I've had my boat for about a month now and taken it out a handful of times. The first time I tried anchoring i just dropped that bad boy down til it hit and tied it to a cleat. I was drifting in circles basically. The 2nd time I went out on the fly I made a jimmy rigged anchor out of a bleach bottle and rope. Same method and just dropped it straight down and tied it off. Stayed pretty still but we were out at camp far west at night in a cove so there wasnt any current or wakes. A few hours into it the rope broke (had no chain). The next time I went out I jimmy rigged a better anchor and picked up 10 ft of chain and filled up an old 1 gallon gas can with pebbles. It probably weighs 15 lbs or so. It works for holding me still for the most part but obviously cant dig in at all. I've used this on the delta sloughs.

I guess my question is....will just the 1 anchor with more rope and chain hold me still? Or do I need 2? Obviously I'd ditch the ghetto gas can and get a regular anchor

After reading some of these responses it sounds like theres some apparent dangers if the anchoring isnt done correctly and i cant have any safety concerns out there

Basically dumb it down for me please lol

salmonid
08-26-2013, 03:00 PM
I'd get a 15# anchor that can dig in, use your chain on it, then get 100' of line. Should be good for the Sac River and down into the delta, at least in somewhat protected spots (not too windy). 50' of anchor line (rode) is TOO SHORT for the Sac river. My friend tried it on his boat in 18' of water, he was slipping downstream.

Like sgs said, never anchor off of the stern, it can swamp and sink your boat. So only tie off from the bow. Also if your anchor gets stuck on the bottom, don't try to pull it out by tying off to the stern- same thing you can sink.

Best,

fishnmike
08-26-2013, 03:07 PM
In a lake where you don't have any current to pull you against your anchor rope you are going to swing in circles.

Get a real anchor, like a Danforth, that will dig in and grab. Bleach bottles, gas cans, etc. are going to drag and put you in a situation you dont' want.

Line Stretcher
08-26-2013, 03:24 PM
I'm not a 100% fan of recommending a Danforth or a Hooker to someone that's not sure how to set and retrieve one on a river. If you're in the mud it's usually pretty simple but if you hang it on a snag it can be a SOB. Maybe a Pyramid would be better until he gets used to the process.

I realize he'll have to learn some time but he doesn't have a lot of freeboard and could easily pull himself under trying to get it to release. Maybe get some practice in on a calm lake first.

hrairguitar
08-26-2013, 03:25 PM
so when you say the "bow" do you mean anchor to cleats that are towards the front of the boat where i'd tie off to dock or the part i'd attach the wench too when loading?

fishnmike
08-26-2013, 03:35 PM
I'm not a 100% fan of recommending a Danforth or a Hooker to someone that's not sure how to set and retrieve one on a river. If you're in the mud it's usually pretty simple but if you hang it on a snag it can be a SOB. Maybe a Pyramid would be better until he gets used to the process.

I realize he'll have to learn some time but he doesn't have a lot of freeboard and could easily pull himself under trying to get it to release. Maybe get some practice in on a calm lake first.

Good point.

Line Stretcher
08-26-2013, 03:43 PM
so when you say the "bow" do you mean anchor to cleats that are towards the front of the boat where i'd tie off to dock or the part i'd attach the wench too when loading?

That's a good point. I think in your case you might want to look into adding a cleat to the deck that's heavily re-enforced below the deck. If you hang up an anchor you could rip those deck cleats right out.

A re-enforced deck cleat will be much easier to release if something goes wrong. Trying to reach up under the bow to release it could be difficult.

hrairguitar
08-26-2013, 03:55 PM
That's a good point. I think in your case you might want to look into adding a cleat to the deck that's heavily re-enforced below the deck. If you hang up an anchor you could rip those deck cleats right out.

A re-enforced deck cleat will be much easier to release if something goes wrong. Trying to reach up under the bow to release it could be difficult.

ok so i need another cleat specifically for the anchor basically to the deck with good reinforcement underneath that way when the anchor is in the water its pulling straighter than versus one of the front side cleats and with it being there it will be easily accessible to tie/untie?

Line Stretcher
08-26-2013, 04:06 PM
ok so i need another cleat specifically for the anchor basically to the deck with good reinforcement underneath that way when the anchor is in the water its pulling straighter than versus one of the front side cleats and with it being there it will be easily accessible to tie/untie?
Yes, that's the idea. Ideally you'd install a anchor roller at the bow and a cleat that you can easily reach somewhere behind it. There are several variations of the roller and many are very compact and easy to install. In fact, some are just guides and don't have rollers at all. For a fairly light anchor that's usually all you need.

hrairguitar
08-26-2013, 04:15 PM
Ok ..yah I've seen those at roller thins. I don't know if I have room on my deck with my trolling motor but I do anticipate doing more anchor fishing than trolling for bass so its probably somethin I should look into.

Hey thanks again for the responses. I feel a lot more comfortable about this anchor stuff now

JB14
08-26-2013, 05:01 PM
Here's some info to check out. Like everything involving a boat, it just takes some time and a little practice. You'll get the hang of it.

http://www.cncphotoalbum.com/technical/anchorguide.htm

Ps - always keep a knife handy where if your anchor line gets hit by something in the river you can cut it and keep your bow from taking on water.

salmonid
08-26-2013, 08:55 PM
hrairguitar, practice it and you should be fine, listen to sgs though (carry a sharp knife ready to slice your anchor line if it's snagged and you can't pull it) and wear your pfd yourself when pulling it at least until you're more experienced.

Lots of drownings happen when anchoring or pulling it in the river. If you can get to Verona or KL, I'll give you some pointers on the water. Just send a pm with some advance notice.


Best,

Jetspray
08-27-2013, 05:36 AM
I use anchors that do not require chains, for me they work great and you can get them loose from snags on the bottom easily. There are a ton of them on websites of different sizes and types. I mostly troll but sit fishin' is OK too........Jetspray

K-15
08-27-2013, 06:18 AM
Good points above as allways, something to remember too is if you haven't "set the hook" in the area before,..idle upstream slowly looking at your graph, you don't want to drop your anchor into a tree or log on the bottom, or drag into it.A large anchor rope float is handy to,..if you hook a large fish and have to chase it, you can drop it over return to it,in the time spent pulling a anchor, you can be spooled.Be careful to of dropping the anchor and throwing the line over,..the rope can float back with the current and get caught on the motor,seen it happen, it gets ugly in a hurry, feel the anchor hit bottom and feed out line in a controlled manner.Good luck! Mike

saxman1
08-27-2013, 08:46 AM
I haven't seen any posts about the slip ring anchors. I don't have one, but the concept of easy retrieve is interesting. Will they hold as good as other anchors They seem to be lighter than most.

kickinit
08-27-2013, 12:49 PM
I haven't seen any posts about the slip ring anchors. I don't have one, but the concept of easy retrieve is interesting. Will they hold as good as other anchors They seem to be lighter than most.

I use a slip ring anchor. It works pretty much like a Danforth but if you get it stuck on something you have a better chance of getting it loose. You just drive upstream of the snag, give it some slack and then a good pull. The ring then slides to the other end of the anchor and pulls it from under whatever it snagged.

salmonid
08-27-2013, 02:21 PM
Look up "columbia river" or "rocking chair" anchor too, that's what I have. If you snag up, you pull it out from up river and a zip tie breaks off, then the anchor chain is now pulling from the bottom of the anchor and it comes right out.

Best,

Line Stretcher
08-27-2013, 04:25 PM
I use a Hooker which is a smaller but weightier version of a Danforth. On these, you just drop the anchor, drive forward to orient it and then drift back to set it. To release it you just drive forward over it and it lays out flat and releases.

I've never had it not work but I've watched others that couldn't free one up. All I'm going to say is that when the bow or stern starts to feel like it's going under, cut the rode and live to fish another day.

redneckpunk
08-27-2013, 08:55 PM
and if youre worried about it holding, I think this one might work for you. :bananadevil:

3000 lbs MILITARY BOAT ANCHOR 2000.00 O.B.O. (http://sfbay.craigslist.org/nby/boa/3995796283.html)

~RNP

salmonid
08-27-2013, 09:07 PM
LOL, price seems a bit steep, plus it would reduce the freeboard on my boat to about -2"...
:rotfl2:

Best,



and if youre worried about it holding, I think this one might work for you. :bananadevil:

3000 lbs MILITARY BOAT ANCHOR 2000.00 O.B.O. (http://sfbay.craigslist.org/nby/boa/3995796283.html)

~RNP

Reel Fun
08-31-2013, 06:20 PM
Just get a box anchor and forget it!!! Trust me! No chain....and about half the rope as a normal anchor. Best anchor I have ever seen for the delta. RF

bigfishonly
09-04-2013, 12:26 PM
You need enough slack to absorb the 6' wake from all the yahoos on the river.

Nailed it.