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View Full Version : Smoked sturgeon recipes? Post em up!



Skipjacker707
11-25-2013, 05:44 PM
I want to smoke some sturgeon but don't have any recipes or lengths of time, etc. I just bought a new pellet smoker so if you have any recipes post em up please!

dsa2780
11-29-2013, 05:08 PM
I've never smoked sturgeon, but I do smoke a lot of other white fleshed fish throughout the year leading up to salmon season. I follow a hot smoking recipe that is great for any species.

Leave skin on your fish if possible.

Take fish and pour into a simple brine of salt, brown sugar and a little olive oil. The white fish needs the oil to become infused with smoke because it lacks what Salmon, herring and other oily fish have. Pack a layer of salt, brown sugar and a bit of oil, then repeat until you've layered all of your fish. Leave in the fridge overnight for no more than 8-12 hours.

Rinse the fish. Or you'll regret it.

Set up a fan on a counter top you don't mind being out of use for the day. Lay out some paper plates and lay your fish on them. Turn the fan on low.

In a sauce pan heat a ratio of 5 to 1 of brown sugar and rum. Dissolve it but don't let it boil or get remotely hot.

Brush the mixture over the fish in front of the fan.

Do this every hour for 5 hours.

Crack coarse black pepper over it.


When it's done,smoke it like you would salmon. I like my fish a bit more dry, so I go until the fish is dry enough to my taste.



Just one way to do it.

Skipjacker707
12-08-2013, 09:25 AM
Thanks dsa2780

WhopperStopper
12-11-2013, 01:56 PM
That's looks like an awesome recipe dsa. The salt/brown sugar/ oil mix is a dry cure not a brine correct? Or do you dissolve it in water then add the fish? The brown sugar/ rum glaze ssounds like a great kicker.

dsa2780
01-20-2014, 09:46 PM
That's looks like an awesome recipe dsa. The salt/brown sugar/ oil mix is a dry cure not a brine correct? Or do you dissolve it in water then add the fish? The brown sugar/ rum glaze ssounds like a great kicker.


Didn't see your post for awhile Whopper, sorry man. Yeah, I guess you could say the salt and sugar mixture is a dry cure or more like a dry rub. No water needed. Fish, like other meat has it's own moisture in it and I assume the recipe calls for the dry cure mixture in order to draw most of the the moisture out of the fish. No brining needed. The glaze is really awesome yeah. It's sweet, but not overpowering and really compliments the flavor of fish while giving it kind of a needed texture. The edges and outside of the fish really caramelize. Those are the pieces I take for myself lol before bagging it up in the fridge for my parents and others lol.