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View Full Version : KIMCHI!!!!



CJC
03-05-2009, 03:54 PM
For those with a fiery tongue. ;D ;D ;D

I worked for a Korean owned manufacturing company in the past and one of the fringe benefits is the quarterly free meals at some of the great Korean restaurants in Santa Clara. The owner would take all the exempts and order some really exotic Korean meals. That's where I learned how to appreciate kimchi and I do miss those great meals! ;D ;D ;D

This recipe was given to me by one of the ladies in the company that made her own and I (being me ;D ;D ;D) had to modify it to my taste and what is available to me.

So here it is

1 Napa cabbage, 3 lbs, cut in 2"-3" sections.
2 Chile powder, 2/3 cup. I use the Korean powder made by Wang. It is mild, sort of like New Mexico chilies.
3 1 tsp ground garlic
4 3 Tai chilies, minced. (Substitute for ginger) The chili powder is not hot enough for me. ;D ;D ;D
5 10 stalks of green onions, cut in 2" lengths.
6 1 tbl sp sugar
7 4 tbl sp + 1 tsp pickling salt
8 2 tbl sp fish sauce (I decided to use fish sauce in leau of shrimp paste since I had that handy).

Place the napa cabbage and the green onions in a large Tupperware container and mix in the 4 tbl sp of salt. Let it sit overnight. Then rinse with cold water and discard the liquid that was shed by the cabbage.

Mix in the rest of the ingredients and store in a 2 quart bottle. I believe a big rock is used to hold the cabbage compressed down while it pickles but I used a sealable bag full of water to do so. Store in a cool place for 3-8 days depending on the temperature. I leave it out at room temperature for 2 days and then refrigerate it. When its done it acquires a slightly sour taste from the fermentation process.
http://img155.imageshack.us/img155/2259/p3040101.jpg

metalmouth
03-05-2009, 04:06 PM
Cool recipe CJT! I'll have to add that to my repertoire!

CJC
03-05-2009, 04:18 PM
Thanks MM! A picture was added.

MB_Kevin
03-05-2009, 04:27 PM
Looks cool JT!

okie
03-05-2009, 07:03 PM
compadre, i use more non iodized salt spread over the cabbage, let stand overnight or unti cabbage is tender. rinse thourghly, add other ingredients, i use korean ground red pepper.
i like it right after makin it, sometimes we set some out to get sour and make kimchi pancakes with it, really a good healthy snack.
haven't made it in a long time, usually just buy a couple of gallons at the market, faster and easier.
bill

CJC
03-05-2009, 07:19 PM
haven't made it in a long time, usually just buy a couple of gallons at the market, faster and easier.
bill
Okie,
The store bought ones have a lot of MSG. That's why I started to make my own. ;)

I also have some before it turns sour. Who can wait that long, huh? ;D ;D ;D

okie
03-05-2009, 08:13 PM
you would probably like kimchi fried rice too. get you some korean pancake batter, make a batter with water, beat and add 1 egg, cut some sour kimchi in about 1" pieces, mix it in batter, cook in lightly greased skillet until edges appear cooked, turn and cook the top side, great snack.
the kimchi we get here doesn't have that much msg i dont think, at least my wife dont complain about it and she dont like it either. but i agree with you, the homemade is best
bill

nickjew1
03-05-2009, 11:46 PM
looks delicious. my mom just made some, but yours looks a bit more appetizing.

03-06-2009, 07:28 AM
Cool recipe JT. Does your whole house smell when you crack that jar open? ;D

I'm the only one in my household that will eat any quantity of kimchi, so we don't go through much of it. It's usually a 'summer' thing with me also as I like to serve it with Korean BBQ. :) [smiley=chowtime.gif] :)

okie
03-06-2009, 07:38 AM
mooch, kimchi always tastes better with korean bbq and other korean /asian dishes, however, do not eat kimchi for bkfst along with pancakes and maple syrup, i love both, but when i did that in taiwan, my stomach told me not to do it again, somethin about syrup and kimchi, i guess they dont mix well.

Farrier_Frank
03-06-2009, 08:03 AM
... do not eat kimchi for bkfst along with pancakes and maple syrup, i love both, but when i did that in taiwan, my stomach told me not to do it again, somethin about syrup and kimchi, i guess they dont mix well.

[smiley=rotfl2.gif] I love Kimchi, too, but for breakfast? I don't think so.... and with syrup? Not a chance!!

Another great post JT. [smiley=thumbsup.gif] I might even try making it myself; never had it fresh.

okie
03-06-2009, 02:12 PM
when its fresh, it dont smell bad, just a little garlic, depending on how much was used, as it gets 'older' or left out at room temp it starts to smell. took some to work in taiwan and the site chief thought we had a natural gas leak when the admin chief opened it.
ff, if you want to make some, i'd be happy to help you sometime when i'm down there.
bill

Jetspray
03-06-2009, 06:28 PM
Never aquired a taste for it, bad experience with it years ago. My brother-inn-law was briefly married to a Korean woman who stayed at my condo in 1975. She made some but I think it needed to age as was stated before. When we ate it the salt about killed my senses as well as too much heat. Still willing to give it a try and your recipe looks like a good one. Okie needs to show me how to age it without getting botchallisim......Jetspray

CJC
03-06-2009, 07:34 PM
When we ate it the salt about killed my senses as well as too much heat.I hate to tell you this but this dish is supposed to be very salty. It is like in any kind of pickles. The Salt and the acidity after fermentation is what keeps it from spoiling. Remember that this has no preservatives except for the salt. As far as the heat is concerned I guess you can adjust it to your own taste.

okie
03-06-2009, 09:11 PM
jetspray, when we fixed it after getting married, we had 2 great big plastic dish pans. we would cut the cabbage into 1 1/2 to 2" pieces, put a bed of cabbage down sprinkle salt all over it, more cabbage and salt until you had it all in. let it set 6 to 8 hours until the cabbage was tender, not crispy. wash thourghly to remove all the salt, drain as much as possible. add red pepper powder, chopped green onions, minced garlic, anchovy sauce or shrimp sauce, small amount of sugar, small amount of salt.
i think thats it, mix it real well and taste, adjust ingredients to taste. i ate it from fresh to sour. we have kept it in the frig for several weeks without getting too sour to eat. sometimes we set it out at room temp for a couple of day (in the summer) to let it sour to make soup or kimchi pancakes.
now we buy it at the korean market on folsom blvd a couple blocks from bradshaw or the asian market on el camino real in santa clara. we have never got a jar we didn't like, and its alot easier than makin it. i like the turnip kimci better to eat with korean bbq, to me it has a better flavor.
if we ever meet at a fest, if i remember i'll bring some, make some korean bbq, kimchi, kimchi pancakes, the pancakes are good to snack on.

Jetspray
03-07-2009, 09:13 AM
Thanks for the replies fellas, I know there must be a good side to this. I am just one of those who does not like too much seasoning on anything, Just enough to give it some good flavor not to pound you into submission. Salt can be used in moderation on stuff, otherwise it becomes a salt lick.....Jetspray

hansolo2009
08-26-2009, 03:34 AM
As a korean-american, i've had my share of kimchi (i.e., every korean meal).

But here are some things it's good with...
Kraft Mac & Cheese (kimchi on the side)
rice & hot dogs (ketchup, not mustard)
Some korean-owned american-style delis in the Bay Area (think Berkeley, Oakland, peninsula) will have bulgogi burgers or kalbi burgers and i think kimchi might be put in the sandwich. i've never tried...kimchi & white bread is a stretch for me...

I've heard kimchi pizza is big in some places (maybe LA, big Asian cities, Hawaii)...i'm from new york so even deep-dish is pizza is a no-no for me so kimchi pizza is verboten...

thanks for posting...didn't think kimchi would show up on a fishing board...only in California!!!

okie
08-29-2009, 12:02 PM
jetspray, kimchi should not have a salty taste, if your friends wife made it and it tasted salty she probably didn't rinse the cabbage good before she made it. after you wash the cabbage you put a lot of salt on it, when my wife made it she used sea salt, and rinsed it real good, added green onions, ginger, garlic, anchovy sauce, and something else. she hasn't made it but once since we left taiwan, she made some while we were in germany but now she just buys it from the market, it is a lot of trouble to fix if you do it right.
we get ours from yim's market on rock in reno, or at a korean market in santa clara if down there or on folsom blvd in sac.
maybe i'll try to bring some stuff and make some kimchi pancakes at the fest in oct.

Farrier_Frank
09-01-2009, 11:00 PM
I do like kimchi, always keep a jar of it in the fridge. But kimchi pancakes? You're gonna have to do a lot of talking, Okie, to convince me on kimchi pancakes. ::)

hansolo2009
09-02-2009, 06:02 AM
Farrier, i know you're just joshing, but korean pancakes are not like flapjacks. rather than flour, they're made with ground-up mung bean. you add some pork, scallions, kimchi, and some other stuff and cook it on a skiddle. Dip it in a soy sauce/vinegar/sesame seed mixture, and it's real good. Great for camping trips. Koreans eat it as a side dish, but in korean restaurants in america, they're sold as appetizers (we don't have proper appetizers in korea...or dessert for that matter).

In korean, they're called bin-deh-dduk. Another variation uses seafood a different flour, and it's called pah-jun.

Japan has a similar pancake that is popular during summer festivals. It has a great name...it's called okonomiyaki. They use a shredded pickled ginger (similar to the stuff when you order sushi but it's shredded) which personally, i think ruins it. Also, they use a different sauce...similar to a sweet bulldog sauce. No kimchi in it, though.

FYI...han

Farrier_Frank
09-02-2009, 07:32 AM
Farrier, i know you're just joshing, but korean pancakes are not like flapjacks. rather than flour, they're made with ground-up mung bean. you add some pork, scallions, kimchi, and some other stuff and cook it on a skiddle. Dip it in a soy sauce/vinegar/sesame seed mixture, and it's real good.

I wasn't joshing, han. I am always ready to try new foods, but the thought of kimchi pancakes brought to mind Bisquick and vanilla with maple syrup, and the thought of throwing some kimchi in that mix sounded repulsive. However, now that you have explained what it really is I would be more than happy to sample a dish of kimchi pancakes.

The other thing I know for sure is if Okie is putting out a dish for a Fest the best place to be is in the front of the line. His meatballs are probably the best I've ever eaten. 8-)

okie
09-02-2009, 08:12 AM
ff, you are much too kind but i certainly appreciate it. we make kimchi pancakes with korean pancake mix, kimchi, chopped green onions and some kind of seasoning my wife has, i think it is a korean beef soup base. i like to add halepenos to it. we cook it in a skillet with olive oil. if the kimchi is freah its not as good, when its a little bit sour is when i think the flavor is best. are you goin to be at the fest?
for the fest, i was thinkin about some bbq and either shrimp or meatballs, probably go with the meatballs, they are easier and i dont think people really liked the spicy shrimp as much.

hansolo2009
09-02-2009, 08:23 AM
Farrier: Most korean restaurants in the bay area will have either of the 2 dishes i mentioned as appetizers. Try 1.

Order 1 when you're with a group of people. 1 dish for 2 people is a bit much...you'll be full before the real meal comes out. they're really meant to be side dishes (ban chan). A good korean restaurant will give you up to 10 ban chan complementary with your meal. 3 or 4 will be a type of kimchi (cabbage, cucumber, radish, etc.). One of the side dishes might be 3 or 4 pieces of the pancake. One restaurant in Oakland gives 16-20 side dishes free per table. Either 4 rows or 4 or like this past Saturday night, 5 rows of 4!!!! Awesome! Next time, i'll take a picture of the spread and PM you...han

okie
09-06-2009, 02:32 AM
Han, where do you eat korean food? when we go to morgan hill we usually stop in santa clara on el camin real and shop at a korean market and go to a place along there, generally to a buffet.
bill

hansolo2009
09-07-2009, 03:05 PM
I live in the East Bay & live within walking distance of a korean BBQ place called Ohgane...40th & Broadway. There's also an Ohgane in San Leandro. Their business is so good that their family has opened up 2 speculative ventures in Oakland, Kangnam (a vietnamese pho house korean-style) and a hip sushi house next door to that (Kansai)...Ohgane's brother-in-law & son, respectively. I don't recommend those 2 korean restaurants, but i highly recommend Ohgane.

When i was a grad student at Cal a couple of years ago, the Korean conglomerates would host recruiting dinners for PhDs and MBAs at the best restaurants in Berkeley & Cal. Samsung, LG, Hyundai, Kia...all of them would host dinners at Sam Won Kalbi & Koryo Kalbi (all in Oakland...both good but no different than any good kalbi restaurant in any city). When Ohgane opened, all the companies moved there because it's easily the best. There is now an official KoreanTown in Oakland (1st one in Northern California) and because there are so many korean restaurants, they're all specialized: kalbi, stew, tofu, chinese-style korean, sushi, chicken & beer. Short of dogmeat, whatever your hankering, there's 1 for it.

On a scale of 1-10, i'd say the Oakland korean food scene is a 4. SF proper is a 3 and i don't know about the peninsula. NYC is an 8 and LA K-Town is a 10. Some will say that LA korean food is better than korean food in Korea!!! SF proper is a world-class city except when it comes to professional sports, a respected newspaper, and if you're korean, the korean food.

I don't know what you're looking for or what your budget is, but for true korean bbq, i only go to one place now...with a large bottle of beer for 2 and tip, you'll bust your belly for $60-70, have enough to bring some meat home, and know it's legit because real korean people eat there. - han

tunaman
09-09-2009, 01:32 PM
Most places that serve Kimchi as I've experienced have never been consistent. The problems I've seen is either they are too soggy, too much salt remained, not fermented enough to be ready to serve so you taste more of the cabbage and not enough to get the combined spice and cabbage taste, or too leafy. I like more of the crunch part, not the leafy part. Another popular kimchi is called gak du ki, it is a large root and it is crunchy, no it's not ginseng, the only thing about eating gak du ki is you will burp a lot and it smells! everyone will run away! you will need to rinse out with some shi ke, it's a sweet rice barley drink and I can drink gallons of that stuff!

okie
09-09-2009, 11:24 PM
reels, is the kimchi you're talkin about that you like look like little white carrots with the leaves still on it? if so, thats baby turnips, i prefer the turnip kimchi, it's the white squares about 3/4' cubes.
you're right about the cabbage kimchi tasting different, it all depends on how it's made. the only place i have been able to get it where it seemed to taste the same all the time was in a supermarket in taegu. if it's fresh you really dont taste anything but the cabbage, the longer it sets the more flavor you get, i like it when it starts getting a little sour.
different people use different spices and amounts, most of the salty kimchi is because they dont wash it good after it sets in the salt brine.

fishstix
09-10-2009, 12:18 AM
From all this talk I'm sure you guys will appreciate this website.

http://www.maangchi.com/recipe/kimchi-kaktugi

One of the best tutorials I've seen on how to make the stuff. She makes both the traditional Kimchi along with the radish gak du ki.

hansolo2009
09-10-2009, 02:26 AM
okie, the little white carrots with leaves is called chong-gak kimchi or sometimes al-tari kimchi (i used to called it Atari when i was young). they're actually shaped like upside down carrots since the end of the radish is fatter than where the stem is. Good stuff.

ggag-dugi is cubed and made from huge radishes...several pounds each. they're white with a green-colored "cap". Also, good stuff.

Favorites are oi-kimchi (cucumbers)...actually, they're all good and there is a season for all of them...should be since this was the old korean way of keeping vegetables edible in winter (pre-refrigeration)....

website for different kinds of kimchi...
http://www.koreanrestaurantguide.com/kimch/kimchi_type.htm

I brought some buddies from grad school to Korea several years ago and for fun, one guy insisted we visit the kimchi museum at the CoEx Building in Seoul. Fun for tourists, I guess. I think adding red chili peppers is a rather recent development (maybe a couple hundred years old). - han

tunaman
09-10-2009, 04:24 AM
reels, is the kimchi you're talkin about that you like look like little white carrots with the leaves still on it? if so, thats baby turnips, i prefer the turnip kimchi, it's the white squares about 3/4' cubes.
you're right about the cabbage kimchi tasting different, it all depends on how it's made. the only place i have been able to get it where it seemed to taste the same all the time was in a supermarket in taegu. if it's fresh you really dont taste anything but the cabbage, the longer it sets the more flavor you get, i like it when it starts getting a little sour.
different people use different spices and amounts, most of the salty kimchi is because they dont wash it good after it sets in the salt brine.

Yeah the one I'm talking about is the square cubes, Radish it is! the cucumber ones are great as well but just like kimchi, sometimes they are not well made to my tastes. I hate soggy kimchi of any type, it has to be crispy! When ever you go to most Korean restaurants, you get all kinds of little pre dinner dishes which you can try to see which ones you like best. Each restaurant will sometimes give you items you have not tried from others you've been too. Sometimes the dishes will vary weekly and you get something new. You should try the live octopus! I tried it once when I was in Korea, it was a total surprise and unexpected! I was forced to eat it, it was a shock at first but once you get the freak out thought out of your mind, it is fresh tasting and kinda fun letting the suckers grab a hold of your cheeks! the sashimi there is very unlike here, the sashimi there is more like cod, my taste buds are not used to that.

okie
09-10-2009, 06:11 AM
i like just about all the kimchi dishes, but the square turnip, shredded turnip and cucumber is my favorites when eating out. i tried the live octopus once, didn't like it, when i was the in the mid 90's a man choked to death from eating live octopus, guess he didn't have enough oil on it.
where were you in korea, i worked in taegu twice and pyong taek once.
bill