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HighLiner
04-29-2014, 08:05 AM
Something that is critical for anyone handling and releasing trout is to realize that the slime on the fish is a protective substance for the health of the fish. If your intent is to release the fish in good health, you do not want to do anything that will remove that from the fish. Just because you saw the fish swim away quickly when you released it, does not mean that it will be alive in a couple of days. Placing the fish in the bottom of your boat to thrash around while you unhook it and take its picture can kill it. The worst thing possible is to hold the fish in a towel. That fish will die. Likewise for shore fishermen letting the fish roll around in the dirt and gravel on the shore of the lake is doing the same thing. The slime coating on the fish is something that helps protect it from various forms of infection. It is wrong to assume that the fish will wash itself off after release. Also gravel and small stones getting inside the gills is not healthy.
If anyone has ever seen a sickly trout swimming in the shallows with an ugly white fungus on it, it is more than likely because of this.
The proper and responsible thing to do is to never take the fish out of the water and to not touch it. Remove the hook while it is still in the water, or cut the line so the hook will rust out. After all, how many photos of twelve inch trout do you need anyway?
The worst possible thing that can be done to one of these fish is to put a finger inside the gills, often while holding it up for a photo. The gills on the fish are far more delicate than most people realize. There was a study done several years ago with white sea bass by catalina island. The fish were fit with sonic tags and this study was specifically done. Most of the fish that were handled by putting a hand inside the gill plate died within a few days.
Another thing is that if you must handle it, be sure to wet your hands before doing so. Dry hands will damage the protective coating on the fish.

Cali Duck
04-29-2014, 08:14 AM
Welcome to the sniffer and thanks for the tips.

I find this especially important for native trout in streams, but for planters I personally am not as shall we say..courteous. Planters that I release often get handled with wet hands, then gently released if not gut hooked. Off to swim another day or feed the environment should they go belly up.

sja
04-29-2014, 01:37 PM
Something that is critical for anyone handling and releasing trout is to realize that the slime on the fish is a protective substance for the health of the fish. If your intent is to release the fish in good health, you do not want to do anything that will remove that from the fish. Just because you saw the fish swim away quickly when you released it, does not mean that it will be alive in a couple of days. Placing the fish in the bottom of your boat to thrash around while you unhook it and take its picture can kill it. The worst thing possible is to hold the fish in a towel. That fish will die. Likewise for shore fishermen letting the fish roll around in the dirt and gravel on the shore of the lake is doing the same thing. The slime coating on the fish is something that helps protect it from various forms of infection. It is wrong to assume that the fish will wash itself off after release. Also gravel and small stones getting inside the gills is not healthy.
If anyone has ever seen a sickly trout swimming in the shallows with an ugly white fungus on it, it is more than likely because of this.
The proper and responsible thing to do is to never take the fish out of the water and to not touch it. Remove the hook while it is still in the water, or cut the line so the hook will rust out. After all, how many photos of twelve inch trout do you need anyway?
The worst possible thing that can be done to one of these fish is to put a finger inside the gills, often while holding it up for a photo. The gills on the fish are far more delicate than most people realize. There was a study done several years ago with white sea bass by catalina island. The fish were fit with sonic tags and this study was specifically done. Most of the fish that were handled by putting a hand inside the gill plate died within a few days.
Another thing is that if you must handle it, be sure to wet your hands before doing so. Dry hands will damage the protective coating on the fish.

Epic first post..... decided that it was time to get that off your chest?:soapbox5gm:

Welcome aboard!

fishingfrieda
04-29-2014, 01:46 PM
Welcome aboard.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I537 using Tapatalk

Lifted
04-29-2014, 02:09 PM
Epic first post..... decided that it was time to get that off your chest?:soapbox5gm:

Welcome aboard!

Kinda made me laugh too, but sometimes people post that they C&R'ed everything they caught, then post pictures handling the fish in a towel or covered in dirt. The obvious intent of C&R is for the fish to survive, but I've met a surprising number of people with their hearts in the right place yet unaware of how fragile & important the fish's slime coating is.

Shoreman
04-29-2014, 02:25 PM
All you have to do is see one 18" Brook Trout (dead) in Red Lake with that white bacteria all over it, like I did, to make you realize what you said is sooooo true. Thanks for bringing this up.

Kokamojoe
04-30-2014, 02:09 PM
Excellent post! I like to release my trout onto the BBQ. If I catch and release, then I use a single barbless hook and release at the water if possible. You are correct! A lot of people preach catch and release with 3 treble hooks on their lures and take sh$t eating grin photos with their hands all over the fish. Either eat the fish or let them go properly!

panther
04-30-2014, 03:56 PM
Good topic! I C&R my fish, and just keep it simple. I always wet my hand before handling a fish. When I'm in a boat or my pontoon, I just lean over and release him at the waterline. When I bank fish, if I take a picture I do it with water lapping up on the fish as it lies on the shore. And I release it quickly. When my granddaughter fishes with me, she willingly accepts these procedures.

Owlman2
04-30-2014, 05:25 PM
I don't disagree with what you are saying, but I often find it impossible to follow much of the time, particularly with larger fish. If I cannot control them in some fashion, I often find it extremely difficult to get the hook out.

What I have often resorted to is gripping their lower jaw with a Boca grip, then just leaving them in the water that way while I use needle nose pliers to take the hook(s) out.

If using spoons or plugs with treble hooks, I don't think leaving the hook(s) in is really an option. Even with a single treble sometimes their mouth is hooked shut.

I do agree though that touching the fish is best avoided if at all possible.

Welcome aboard BTW!

salmonid
04-30-2014, 06:35 PM
Welcome to the Sniffer.

The advice you give is sound for maximizing fish viability: keep them in the water as much as possible is probably the #1 thing we can do for C&R. If you want a pic, raise it up briefly after getting it unhooked. I like seeing fish pics with water dripping off them!

Same thing goes for salmon and steelhead.

Probably a whole other thread, but using a Boga grip to hoist the fish out of water can also be really bad. There was a study on saltwater fish that showed almost all of them died within 24 hours after being hoisted up vertically with a Boga- even though they looked fine when released. They did X-rays and found the fish had detached spinal columns and jaws. Not good. Fish handled with out the grip survived fine.

I don't know if anyone has looked at our California fish yet, but something to think about when C&Ring those stripers.

Best,

Jetspray
04-30-2014, 07:37 PM
Oh boy at 63 years old that's just what I need another lecture:129fs238648::nana::worm:........Jetspray http://www.fishsniffer.com/forums/trout-board/84872-proper-way-c-r-trout.html

Troutbead
04-30-2014, 09:56 PM
Oh boy at 63 years old that's just what I need another lecture:129fs238648::nana::worm:........Jetspray http://www.fishsniffer.com/forums/trout-board/84872-proper-way-c-r-trout.html

Despite popular belief old dogs can be taught new tricks. We are never to old to learn though sometimes change is hard I say we all give it a try what have we got to lose?

Jetspray
05-01-2014, 04:07 AM
Despite popular belief old dogs can be taught new tricks. We are never to old to learn though sometimes change is hard I say we all give it a try what have we got to lose?
Gee where did I hear that "change" BS before?:hitoverhead: That didn't work out so well did it?:kap1yd: Me I'll just go back to whatever it takes to "make it right" (Mike Holmes):guilty9lp:.........Jetspray

William DFC
05-01-2014, 09:38 PM
just take the pic with fish u want to keep, if u want to release than no pic....simple ...

XPL051v3
05-01-2014, 09:49 PM
just take the pic with fish u want to keep, if u want to release than no pic....simple ...

I'll take a pic with my HDI 7 and release it? Guarantee to survive every time :party:

-Xzi

Captain Compassion
05-01-2014, 10:09 PM
Just do the best you can. Over thinking things can suck the fun out of fishing.:alberte8zp:

Captain Compassion (60 years of guilt free fishing.)

dsa2780
05-01-2014, 10:19 PM
Welcome to the Sniffer.

The advice you give is sound for maximizing fish viability: keep them in the water as much as possible is probably the #1 thing we can do for C&R. If you want a pic, raise it up briefly after getting it unhooked. I like seeing fish pics with water dripping off them!

Same thing goes for salmon and steelhead.

Probably a whole other thread, but using a Boga grip to hoist the fish out of water can also be really bad. There was a study on saltwater fish that showed almost all of them died within 24 hours after being hoisted up vertically with a Boga- even though they looked fine when released. They did X-rays and found the fish had detached spinal columns and jaws. Not good. Fish handled with out the grip survived fine.

I don't know if anyone has looked at our California fish yet, but something to think about when C&Ring those stripers.

Best,


THIS. Boga grips are for toothy fish, I believe they were made to lift barracuda and other salty predators out of the water. They are not for holding a trophy fish vertically. If you're going to use one, support the weight of the fish as if it were in the water, better yet, snap a photo in or near the water and let it go.

Also, I read a pacific northwest steelhead blog for a while and they did a study with a university up there that showed how the average pacific northwest "purist" CnR only flyfishing steelhead wizard is usually great on handling a steelhead in every way except for the fatal one. Rocks. Steelhead actually have really soft skulls and can not take more than a few hits to the head while being fought in shallow water or dragged up the bank. They either die of shock or brain hemorrhaging soon after being released or have permanent brain issues that ultimately will also lead to their deaths.

Interesting I thought...

LURKER916
05-01-2014, 11:45 PM
I only target trout to eat. Mostly.
Steelies I didn't know they had soft heads. Need to change their name to softheads.... Not Steelhead.....
If I catch a native trout with the fly they stay in the hippie approved Orvis net, photos, and pliers to remove the barbless hook. Fish don't feel anything.
If it's a planter trout they feel a hard bonk and then lights out and they get eaten.


Matt

Kokamojoe
05-02-2014, 02:45 AM
All my pictured fish are in the frying pan. The others you don't see, unless it's a water shot. Simple. There is a reason for barbless hooks and long pliers. But, then again do what you want! There are no rules governing how to catch and release except those that revolve around barbless hooks and time/location limits for certain species. You don't have to use fish faith, because there actually is science :krzyhunter4ez::hitoverhead:

Cali Duck
05-02-2014, 08:58 AM
I only target trout to eat. Mostly.
Steelies I didn't know they had soft heads. Need to change their name to softheads.... Not Steelhead.....
If I catch a native trout with the fly they stay in the hippie approved Orvis net, photos, and pliers to remove the barbless hook. Fish don't feel anything.
If it's a planter trout they feel a hard bonk and then lights out and they get eaten.


Matt

Is there a decent catch/release net that doesn't cost $65+?

Jetspray
05-02-2014, 09:31 AM
BTW fellas I like the way HighLiner has trolled his/her way into a discussion, and hooked a few:smile::grin::readinghelp0wn::tit:..........Jet spray

Lifted
05-02-2014, 09:45 AM
Is there a decent catch/release net that doesn't cost $65+?

I got a wood frame one at Cabelas for ~$40. The only downside is that it's really heavy compared to the nice ones. Of course that doesn't really matter unless you're wading and have it attached to you.

LURKER916
05-02-2014, 09:55 AM
Is there a decent catch/release net that doesn't cost $65+?

Got mine on sale.... They are pricey. I also picked up a second from Kienes that is better for only 39.00. That was on sale also.
I always buy sale items or used fishing gear.


Matt

Kokamojoe
05-02-2014, 11:28 PM
Just do the best you can. Over thinking things can suck the fun out of fishing.:alberte8zp:

Captain Compassion (60 years of guilt free fishing.)



Pretty good advise! Cheers

HighLiner
05-08-2014, 10:33 AM
I initially started this thread to help a lot of well intended fishermen who regularly enjoy the trout board. Just like in any sport or activity, everyone's experience levels vary a great deal. Many older experienced goys see a thread on how to safely handle and release trout as being very redundant. Like gee wiz how many times have I seen these kind of articles. Do I REALLY need to be instructed in how to handle a trout.
All a person has to do though is look at all the photos posted by well intentioned anglers and see tons of fish just on this site alone that certainly died as a result of being improperly handled. Many anglers simply do not know that wrapping a fish in a towel (even if it is wet) will kill the fish. Lets face it. Trout as well as all fish are not easy to handle. They are slippery and they wiggle to get free and back into the water). It is hard to safely ( for the fish) handle a fish for a photo for example. Putting a finger inside the gill plate seems to us to be one of the closest things to being able to hold the fish, yet it is deadly for the fish. even touching the gills on a fish can often kill it. It would be like someone sticking their hand all over our lungs. Also studies have shown these fish within two to three days develop a deadly white fungus under the gill plate and in the gills where your finger wiped off the slime coating that protects the fish from infection.
People mean well and are trying to do the right thing be not killing every fish they catch, and I think it is commendable especially with limited fish resources these days. Every fish is important. And to try to do the right thing and release fish only works if the fish is handled properly. If even a few people are helped by this thread, it will be good.

Captain Compassion
05-08-2014, 04:57 PM
I initially started this thread to help a lot of well intended fishermen who regularly enjoy the trout board. Just like in any sport or activity, everyone's experience levels vary a great deal. Many older experienced goys see a thread on how to safely handle and release trout as being very redundant.

Yes indeed Go here
http://www.fishsniffer.com/forums/trout-board/84872-proper-way-c-r-trout.html

CC

fishingfrieda
05-08-2014, 09:08 PM
I initially started this thread to help a lot of well intended fishermen who regularly enjoy the trout board. Just like in any sport or activity, everyone's experience levels vary a great deal. Many older experienced goys see a thread on how to safely handle and release trout as being very redundant. Like gee wiz how many times have I seen these kind of articles. Do I REALLY need to be instructed in how to handle a trout.
All a person has to do though is look at all the photos posted by well intentioned anglers and see tons of fish just on this site alone that certainly died as a result of being improperly handled. Many anglers simply do not know that wrapping a fish in a towel (even if it is wet) will kill the fish. Lets face it. Trout as well as all fish are not easy to handle. They are slippery and they wiggle to get free and back into the water). It is hard to safely ( for the fish) handle a fish for a photo for example. Putting a finger inside the gill plate seems to us to be one of the closest things to being able to hold the fish, yet it is deadly for the fish. even touching the gills on a fish can often kill it. It would be like someone sticking their hand all over our lungs. Also studies have shown these fish within two to three days develop a deadly white fungus under the gill plate and in the gills where your finger wiped off the slime coating that protects the fish from infection.
People mean well and are trying to do the right thing be not killing every fish they catch, and I think it is commendable especially with limited fish resources these days. Every fish is important. And to try to do the right thing and release fish only works if the fish is handled properly. If even a few people are helped by this thread, it will be good.

I'm glad you brought it up. when I first started on this forum I had not a clue on the handling of trout. I'm still fairly clueless about all things trout but I'm learning lol. It's a good post and a good reminder so thank you.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I537 using Tapatalk

borntoscout
05-12-2014, 10:21 AM
My apologies for swatting a dead nag...Using wet hands is almost universally recommended yet in searching the web for empirical evidence that wet is better I could find none. To the contrary there is this passage from one of Ernest Schwiebert’s books that makes it clear he thought dry was best:

“In a two-week experiment on a small ranch pond I caught and released the trout. There were about thirty trout from ten to twenty inches. Each fish gave up a particular part of his dorsal or caudal fin, and the exact nature of this surgery was recorded in a notebook. Each fish had his own page, complete with data regarding his capture. Not one fish died from my handling, and many of them were taken several times each week. The fish were not handled with wet hands, for the danger of squeezing them too tightly with wet hands is greater than the threat of fungus. They were held gently in the water in a natural swimming position until they darted off in their own time. This is the only way to release trout, for the tired fish thrown carelessly back into the water may never recover his equilibrium. In the stream, one should hold them gently with their heads into the current while they recover. Catching and releasing these fish did not impair their energy in any way. They did become increasingly difficult to catch.”

If you can release a fish without touching it or risking torn mouth parts if the fish thrashes about, do it, but for difficult extractions grasping the fish with a dry or damp hand gives a much more secure hold and is a good option in my opinion.

mike_l
05-12-2014, 12:25 PM
grasping the fish with a dry or damp hand gives a much more secure hold and is a good option in my opinion.

uh, if you're landing a fish there's water available. Wet your hands. Dry hands kill fish.

dsa2780
05-12-2014, 09:01 PM
The more and more I think about it, if I ever start really getting into steelhead fishing or native trout fishing, I'm investing in or making a cradle like one of these in this video. I keep reading things about how often steelies die from all sorts of weird handling issue, so the best way to release them is really to just leave them in the deepest water possible or at least so they don't have contact with anything else.

Pretty cool video of a guy I subscribe to on youtube who's based out of BC. He does a lot of meat fishing, but for steelhead, him and his crew are all CnR, and I have to say, they seem to do a pretty good job at it. The thing he says at like 2:16 makes so much sense.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kkC7t1XZZXI



Long version if you guys have time and want an entertaining video about BC steelie fishing. Looks like a super cool place to fish. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QJ3qCuxqsrM


Oh yeah, keeper truck trout are still getting a good whack on the head and their gills ripped. :)

Brickinthewall98
05-12-2014, 09:16 PM
"I mean I'm fully claiming that fish" hahaha interesting video. I like this channel thanks for sharing