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fishyguy
12-01-2006, 12:20 PM
This board is titled "Cookin' Your Catch" but I don't see how you can catch a rack of lamb unless you troll a twenty dollar bill pass your local butcher. * ;D

Some folks find lamb to be a bit gamy but this recipe takes that away. *This is not your traditional baked rack of lamb but rather it is grilled lamb chops. *

The best rack of lamb, in my experience is from Costco. *Their Australlian rack of lamb is second to none.

Start by removing the fat from the rack. *I, know...most will say that the fat imparts flavor to the meat, but for grilling, the fat will cause flare-ups and makes the meat taste greasy. *

Cut the rack into individual ribs and place in a deep dish. *You can use lamb chops instead but the quality of meat on the rack of lamb is superior. *In a small bowl combine 2 fluid ounces of white wine, 2 teaspoons of light soy sauce, 1 teaspoon of cornstarch, 1 teaspoon of sesame oil and about 2 teaspoons of steak rub. *Just about any brand of steak rub will do....it is a combination of mostly salt, garlic powder, black pepper and a bunch of other spices. *You might want to alter the amount of rub to your own taste. *Some folks like it less salty, some more. *Mix the ingredients well and pour over the chops, making sure they're well coated. *Marinating time is 10 minutes.

Fire up the grill but don't get it too hot or the remaining fat on the chops will flare-up. *Grill on one side for just a few minutes until slightly charred but not burnt. *Turn the chops and do the same. *Since the chops are fairly thin, they'll cook fast. *The trick is to cook them just enough to get that grilled taste but not to burn or overcook them. *I like mine medium done with just a hint of pink. *Rear lamb is a bit chewy.

I have tried rack of lamb and lamb chops at some fine restaurants and nothing I've tried even comes close to the flavor and tenderness of lamb done this way. *
Hope you all like it.

spinfisher
12-04-2006, 01:27 PM
Sounds fantastic! Lamb is one of my favorites. I get the racks from the University of Nevada "Wolfpack Meats" at the Ag school. They sell "Greek" style marinated racks and we grill them when we want something really elegant. They are wonderful! But I'll have to get some unmarinated ones and try your recipe, too. :D

foggy
12-04-2006, 05:17 PM
If you ever need lamb let me know.We sell are product to some pretty high end restraunts in the Napa valley.
So i guess there good to bad i hate lamb.
We just had are first new borns yesterday a set of twins .It looks like lambing season is starting ::)

metalmouth
12-04-2006, 08:06 PM
Remember, it is a Greek custom to eat the eyeballs of the lamb. :D

spinfisher
12-05-2006, 11:25 AM
It's a Greek custom to eat the whole lamb, including some parts even more improbable than the eyeballs.

The lamb has to still be milk fed for those recipes to work... :P

metalmouth
12-05-2006, 12:05 PM
I grew up around some people named Savalas, Protopoplous, Valamous, Ariaga, Basterchia, Ananopolous and such. We had some great lamb feeds. My dad lost and eye as a race car driver. He always had a problem when the heads of the families were honored by having the lambs eyeball served. 8-) They do have an interesting crunch! As far as the tripe, sweet bread, blood sausage, brain, tongue and stuff, I'll pass.

Farrier_Frank
12-06-2006, 06:05 AM
My heritage is a long line of Scots' and lamb has been a main stay in our diet forever, my brother still has a flock. The big key to cooking lamb above everything else is DON'T OVER COOK IT!

metalmouth
12-06-2006, 07:09 AM
Amen Frank! Lamb has a different appearance than beef when cooked. Slightly pink is medium to medium well and you have over cooked it. Lamb should be seared on a hot fire so that the meat is done on the outside and pink clear through. Not red and wiggling, but pink.

spinfisher
12-16-2006, 10:19 PM
Sorry to disagree, MM, lamb kidneys are good - way better than beef or even veal kidneys. And tongue (of lamb or any sort) are really excellent. Try anise-cooked, chinese style, fr instance (oh, that is pronounced AN-is ;))

Sweetbreads, I've had once, and they were ok, but not too interesting. And, yeah, brains... I tried to make them once and was not happy with the result, but then, I also didn't really know what I was doing.

The intestines (not tripe - intestines, with contents...) are scary [smiley=yikes.gif], but I had some in an Argentine style "Parillada", and, you know, if you trust the chef ::), they're good.

drstressor
12-16-2006, 10:29 PM
"Parillada" is the upper intestine from a milk fed lamb. The chef has to know where the milk stops and the poop starts. :-/

CJC
12-26-2006, 08:20 PM
Sorry to disagree, MM, lamb kidneys are good - way better than beef or even veal kidneys. And tongue (of lamb or any sort) are really excellent. Try anise-cooked, chinese style, fr instance (oh, that is pronounced AN-is ;))

Sweetbreads, I've had once, and they were ok, but not too interesting. And, yeah, brains... I tried to make them once and was not happy with the result, but then, I also didn't really know what I was doing.

The intestines (not tripe - intestines, with contents...) are scary [smiley=yikes.gif], but I had some in an Argentine style "Parillada", and, you know, if you trust the chef ::), they're good.

LOL, and I thought all you guys eat was fish! ;) ;D ;D ;D ;D

BTW what are sweetbreads?

CJC
12-26-2006, 08:22 PM
"Parillada" is the upper intestine from a milk fed lamb. The chef has to know where the milk stops and the poop starts. :-/
I thought that was from cow intestines???

spinfisher
01-03-2007, 10:51 AM
"Parillada" is actually a Patagonian, or Argentine, feast with many grilled meats, blood sausage, and "variety" meats (such a dainty expression... ;D). It is made in Chile and Peru as well, and the ingredients vary according to the animal at hand. We had one for New Year's Eve at my sister's in Miami, cooked by her Chilean husband. Too yummy! (yes, even the strange stuff) ::)

Meat, 2 fiery hot sauces, salad, and excellent Chilean Cab! Way to see the old year out! :D

metalmouth
01-03-2007, 12:58 PM
I've attended those feasts at a girlfriends parents house right before the Falklands War. They were from Argentina. I think I'm sticking with a good old Fillet Mignon! Some of that stuff is not quite the end of the cow I want to be sticking with a fork. ;D

CJC
01-03-2007, 04:10 PM
I've attended those feasts at a girlfriends parents house right before the Falklands War. They were from Argentina. I think I'm sticking with a good old Fillet Mignon! Some of that stuff is not quite the end of the cow I want to be sticking with a fork. ;D

I don't know MetalMouth. I actually miss some of that stuff. And many of then can't be found in my local butcher store. Nothing wrong with fillet mignon, but I like some variety for a change. And yes, I go and enjoy a menudo occasionally. :'( ;D

metalmouth
01-03-2007, 08:10 PM
I think my problem was lack of familiarity with some of the spice combinations. The blood sausage gave me heartburn about 2 seconds after I swallowed it. :-/