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View Full Version : Banning the Fishing of Cod



JoeReal
11-11-2014, 04:00 PM
When the system is large and has many parts... Opinions will vary and will be skewed towards your interests, especially if your livelihood is on the line. What says you?



Regulators Ban Cod Fishing In New England As Stocks Dwindle : The Salt : NPR (http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2014/11/11/363342277/regulators-ban-cod-fishing-in-new-england-as-stocks-dwindle)


http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2014/11/11/ap284513091321_wide-b182a78ce8fcc24f3f2c4f36fc1d91dcefc251c7-s40-c85.jpg

BigUnInDaBoat
11-11-2014, 06:34 PM
When the fish are gone, they are gone forever. Let them find work doing other things. There is such thing as sustainable fishing.

dsa2780
11-11-2014, 08:53 PM
I can think of at least two wars fought over cod. Cod has always been, and probably always will be the worlds most sought after fish. I really don't know why. It's wormy as hell and from a sport fishing point of view, I have a friend who used to fish them back in the day off the coast of Gloucester Mas, and he said they fight like a literal cinderblock crossed with a wet rag. Heavy to pull up, but put up little to no fight.

Eh, I blame the culinary and marketing world for the overfishing and exploitation of many species. Rockfish just rebounded here on the west coast, but over in the east, their striper fishery is soon to be on its deathbed and their bottomfishing options will continue to dwindle.

People should be buying commercially fished Asian carp and common carp. Keep and kill as many fish as you want to on your own, the commercial fisheries are really what destroy populations of deep sea fish.


On another note, the stripers on the east coast are commercially fished and in recent years, party boats have really started taking their tole on the big breeders, as tourists and people looking for a true "East coast stripah" pay charter boats big money for limits of bass. This isn't an uncommon sight from what I'm told and read.

https://i0.wp.com/www.reel-time.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/Party-Boat-dead-fish.jpg






https://s3.amazonaws.com/cdn.surfcastersjournal.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/137777.jpg




https://s3.amazonaws.com/cdn.surfcastersjournal.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/1000x1000px-LL-ae227164_seine9.jpg









https://s3.amazonaws.com/cdn.surfcastersjournal.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/137880.jpg

The east coast and their governments have a history of raping their fisheries, and then being really really good to them for a few years, and then raping them all over again. Sad more than anything, since again, commercial dudes will just move onto another species, and the party boat captains will fish for whatever to impress tourists and fill boats. The ones who suffer are the sportanglers who yeah, still kill fish every now and then, but not at the rate the others do. Cod, stripers, Taug, Fluke, Redfish...they've all been near overfished at some point.

BigUnInDaBoat
11-11-2014, 09:06 PM
Sickening. True sportsmen would not take like that.

dsa2780
11-11-2014, 09:23 PM
Sickening. True sportsmen would not take like that.


No, they wouldn't. Other than a few fly fishing guides and the surfcasting communities from Maine and Montauk down to the Carolinas, most charter boat guides there have no respect for the fish they target. They see fish purely as business assets. A few of those pics with the blue tags are from commercial operations. From what I'm told as well, the demand for striper is really high right now, and it's relatively easy to get your commercial license. That's like if the guides here had the option to drag a net or long line for salmon on top of while they fished with clients with a rod and reel. It would destroy the fishery in a matter of years.

Porem
11-11-2014, 09:41 PM
There is a interesting book by Mark Kurlansky I believe about the history of cod. He also did one about the history of salt and the impact on the world. Both are interesting reads.

On a interesting note I was listening to a piece the other day and they made a statement that both Commerical and sport fishing have near equal economic value to the US economy but commercial fishing equals 97% of the take and sport fishing 3%. I thought that was quite an amazing piece of information. It was noted that this is not evenly spread across species which would be obvious to most sport fisherman.


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salmonid
11-11-2014, 10:05 PM
On a interesting note I was listening to a piece the other day and they made a statement that both Commerical and sport fishing have near equal economic value to the US economy but commercial fishing equals 97% of the take and sport fishing 3%.

I have heard similar before, and, if true, that's crazy how we manage the resource!

Do you have a link or reference to that stat, Porem? I'd be interested to check it out!

Best,

bish0p
11-11-2014, 11:34 PM
When the fish are gone, they are gone forever. Let them find work doing other things. There is such thing as sustainable fishing.


The east coast and their governments have a history of raping their fisheries, and then being really really good to them for a few years, and then raping them all over again. Sad more than anything, since again, commercial dudes will just move onto another species, and the party boat captains will fish for whatever to impress tourists and fill boats. The ones who suffer are the sportanglers who yeah, still kill fish every now and then, but not at the rate the others do. Cod, stripers, Taug, Fluke, Redfish...they've all been near overfished at some point.

Seems they never learn. By the 1870's the wild Atlantic salmon fishery was effectively dead due to overfishing. Currently wild fish make up less than 1% of Atlantic salmon in fish markets, the rest are farmed. The government tried transplanting King salmon to the east. However the Kings didn't like the waters of the Atlantic.

I'm glad the west coast manages its fisheries a little better. Several years ago California had a moratorium on Sacramento River kings for some years which helped the population. We need to be careful with our wild steelhead. California silver salmon population is still dangerously low. Recently Alaska residents suggested a moratorium on Yukon kings.

dsa2780
11-11-2014, 11:38 PM
Seems they never learn. By the 1870's the wild Atlantic fishery was effectively dead due to overfishing. Currently wild fish make up less than 1% of Atlantic salmon in fish markets, the rest are farmed. The government tried transplanting King salmon to the east. However the Kings didn't like the waters of the Atlantic.

I'm glad the west coast manages its fisheries a little better. Several years ago California had a moratorium on Sacramento River kings for some years which helped the population. We need to be careful with our wild steelhead. California silver salmon population is still dangerously low. Recently Alaska residents suggested a moratorium on Yukon kings.


Same with the Kenai. That river is increasingly becoming a sockeye river when it used to have massive runs of colossal Chinooks. But yeah, we have the potential of great sustainable fisheries here in CA, but we other threats and problems that they don't have in the East that ruin or diminish ours. No shortage of fresh water on the east coast...

Porem
11-12-2014, 07:34 AM
Hi Salmonid,

I listen to the Orvis fly fishing podcast and I heard the stat on one of the shows. I am not a fly fisherman and I know Orvis is somewhat controversial but I have a lot of windshield time and need something other than music at times.

I looked up the episode and the stat was mentioned on a recent podcast called "the most important saltwater podcast" he interviewed Whit Fossberg CEO of the Theodore Roosevelt conservation project. It was a interesting piece.

If I find any other references I will let you know.

Best,
Phil


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