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CDK
08-09-2016, 12:57 PM
The color red seems to attract both fish and fisher people.
Why does red work on fish? It even works where the fish's natural food has no red coloring.
Red is the first color to disappear with depth.
Red lures are used successfully at depths.
I am thinking Shrimp flies and rock Cod. I would think it not to be the case.
Thanks
Cal

monkey916
08-09-2016, 01:04 PM
I think since its the first to disappear... The fish see it as black which is easily seen in contrast to the water's background... The dark silhouette is easy to spot... My favorite Salmon jig is red/black but in most cases I fish it... It just appears black
... So yeah it's to catch the fisherman also...

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CDK
08-10-2016, 07:00 AM
I have seen a simple color change work on deep fish. Same lure and presentation. That I find baffling?.

14fishin
08-14-2016, 09:49 AM
Read an article written by an eye doctor who happened to be a avid fisherman and he stated that fish are in fact color blind. Wow what a surprise you should see my tackle box with every color under the sun. He pointed out the that the variety of colors we use all show up differently in a black and white world. Depth an light available all play a role in how an object may be seen. So many factors I don't think we will ever figure it out but I did find the concept interesting.

BarMan
09-20-2016, 02:26 PM
A lot of small fish in the deep reefs are red or orange, excellent camo where red=black, yellow=white but blue still comes through! When I first started fishing the deep reefs (over 30yrs ago) I thought that the color red would be a warning color. Animals with bright red and/or yellow are generally toxic in one way or another. Not so in deep H2O. I think that Vibration and Contrast become the major attractants. Bars get fish because they are shiney and erratic, swim baits get fish because they contrast and vibrate. My 2 cents.

Tifoso
09-20-2016, 03:38 PM
I think since its the first to disappear... The fish see it as black which is easily seen in contrast to the water's background... The dark silhouette is easy to spot... My favorite Salmon jig is red/black but in most cases I fish it... It just appears black
... So yeah it's to catch the fisherman also...

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Not being a smart --- ok? Then, why not just use black?

Tifoso
09-20-2016, 03:39 PM
A lot of small fish in the deep reefs are red or orange, excellent camo where red=black, yellow=white but blue still comes through! When I first started fishing the deep reefs (over 30yrs ago) I thought that the color red would be a warning color. Animals with bright red and/or yellow are generally toxic in one way or another. Not so in deep H2O. I think that Vibration and Contrast become the major attractants. Bars get fish because they are shiney and erratic, swim baits get fish because they contrast and vibrate. My 2 cents.


Makes sense. Welcome aboard! :wine1:

Jetspray
10-26-2016, 07:01 PM
A lot of small fish in the deep reefs are red or orange, excellent camo where red=black, yellow=white but blue still comes through! When I first started fishing the deep reefs (over 30yrs ago) I thought that the color red would be a warning color. Animals with bright red and/or yellow are generally toxic in one way or another. Not so in deep H2O. I think that Vibration and Contrast become the major attractants. Bars get fish because they are shiney and erratic, swim baits get fish because they contrast and vibrate. My 2 cents.+1 you should see my garage and the fish attractions are everywhere....Jetspray

salmonid
10-26-2016, 07:28 PM
I'm mostly a river angler and for river salmon CHARTREUSE is the color to use.

RED = forgetaboutit

Good info and insight in the thread,

http://www.fishnsave.com/images/fullsize/32888.jpg

monkey916
10-26-2016, 07:37 PM
Double bladed red been putting some limits in boats as of late... 😀

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dsa2780
10-26-2016, 08:46 PM
I use chartreuse beads and was slaying them for a few mornings last week. Lol.

Firedawg
04-18-2018, 03:01 PM
I've been having good luck with different colors of UV tape, Stickers, and UV paint. Dirty water Chartruese, clear water pink, blue, black has been pretty good.

Taiki
07-02-2018, 03:04 PM
How deep is the river you are fishing , big blue is different.

Waterdog
07-13-2018, 11:11 AM
Different colors work on different days and different locations but as far back as I can remember red has been considered the go to color, the fish slayer. I have a large collection of outdoor books on fishing and hunting. Many I’ve collected are from the late 1800’s and early 1900’s. Many of them talk about the color red being effective on lures and flys. One of the most famous fishing spoons ever invented is the Daredevil created 120 or so years ago and it is red and white. The Royal Coachman dry fly also one of the most famous flys and also created over 120 years ago has a red body. It looks like no insect in the US but can be quite effective. Is it the red body that makes it effective? No one knows.
In the 1930’s my father was writing a book on fishing. In his notes he mentions that he found the color red to be most effective for bass and walleye (this was in Michigan where he fished).
The postulation of red being a fish attractant color has been around for at least 150 years. Been published in books, magazines and articles. As a kid I would paint a red stripe or splotch on many of my lures. They seemed to catch more fish.
So is there anything to the red color being a killer fish attractant? No one can say for sure either way. Just have to go with what you believe, your instincts and your observations.

CrappieJed
07-22-2018, 01:38 PM
Blood is red fish love blood

HONEYBEE
03-29-2019, 04:37 PM
Read an article written by an eye doctor who happened to be a avid fisherman and he stated that fish are in fact color blind. Wow what a surprise you should see my tackle box with every color under the sun. He pointed out the that the variety of colors we use all show up differently in a black and white world. Depth an light available all play a role in how an object may be seen. So many factors I don't think we will ever figure it out but I did find the concept interesting.

Another point of view
What Fish See byDr. ColinKageyama
An in-depth examination by Dr. Colin Kageyama of how andwhat fish see. This important book will help all anglers to design better fliesand lures by its explanation of the physical processes of light in water andconsequently how colors change and are perceived by fish in varying conditionsof depth, turbidity, and light. Excellent illustrations by Vic Erickson andcolor plates that show startling color changes. This book will change the wayyou fish!