PDA

View Full Version : Black or brown crickets for trout



stefanoflo
05-12-2018, 09:14 PM
anyone have a preference on cricket colr. I see brown means indoor cricket and black crickets are outdoors so if a trout sees a cricket on the water . It has to be a black cricket unless the streams near a house??? or dwelling of sorts
and do fake crickets (Artificial) really catch trout????
Im reading where black crickets are herder than brown soft crickets that i see in bait shops all over . I never see black crickets that stay on your hook better

http://www.differencebetween.net/science/nature/difference-between-black-and-brown-crickets/

Jetspray
05-12-2018, 09:23 PM
Only crickets I use are these.......Jetspray

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Berkley-Pre-Rigged-Atomic-Tube-1-16-Ounce-Soft-Bait-Cricket-PCAT116-CR/32174345?wmlspartner=wlpa&adid=22222222227021133844&wl0=&wl1=g&wl2=c&wl3=40970728712&wl4=pla-78913465472&wl5=9030887&wl6=&wl7=&wl8=&wl9=pla&wl10=8175035&wl11=online&wl12=32174345&wl13=&veh=sem

Waterdog
05-12-2018, 10:09 PM
I havenít used crickets for probably 20 years but when I use to use them they were killer. I use to use them a lot for both trout and small mouth bass at lake Shasta. I used mostly brown crickets and had no problem keeping them on the hook. I never fished them in streams just lakes where I would cast them up around rocky points or against rock cliffs and let them slowly sink. Ultra lite tackle, a small split shot and a brown cricket and I got numerous limits of small mouth and trout.

TexWalker
05-13-2018, 08:12 AM
Field crickets (black) are more common to see around trout streams, however house crickets (brown ones) are easier to purchase and resemble grasshoppers well enough that fish are very eager to take them

chubbswheeler
05-13-2018, 08:18 AM
I'd have to say color preference could matter but if you have a live little stinky cricket that might just make up for the slight color difference that they prefer. Also once you get up the mountain a bit there aren't really crickets as much as there is grasshoppers. Usually yellow wing or something close. They are mostly Brown I. Color. Also there are plenty of terrest fly patterns that knock em dead. A hopper is definitely one. In fact I was just talking about trying one on a spinning rod with split shots. I was wondering why I have never tried as it would be much easier to present to fish in fast flowing creeks..... Good luck

Sent from my Z799VL using Tapatalk

dilbeck
05-14-2018, 11:46 AM
Crickets are so successful not because trout want to eat a cricket or even because they look like a grasshopper but rather because they almost perfectly represent a nymph stonefly. If you're ever hiking around streams in the upper elevations, you'll see literally hundreds, if not thousands of nymph stonefly skeletons attached to rocks just above the water line.

tomaniacal
05-18-2018, 03:30 PM
I use brown crickets I get from pet stores all the time and have great success in areas where water is flowing( streams, tailraces from powerhouses etc.)

dilbeck
05-20-2018, 06:25 PM
I use brown crickets I get from pet stores all the time and have great success in areas where water is flowing( streams, tailraces from powerhouses etc.)

My bad dude. Didn't mean to dislike your post.

I also get mine from pet stores. If I'm going on a long trip, I'll purchase a box of 1,000. And I agree with using them where water is flowing!!!

stefanoflo
05-20-2018, 07:45 PM
Crickets are so successful not because trout want to eat a cricket or even because they look like a grasshopper but rather because they almost perfectly represent a nymph stonefly. If you're ever hiking around streams in the upper elevations, you'll see literally hundreds, if not thousands of nymph stonefly skeletons attached to rocks just above the water line.

I see that On The Moke in Jackson below the 49 Bridge!! downstream!!!!