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Wolf74
08-03-2005, 07:28 PM
Well I went out today to practice fishing with a baitcasting reel. Needless to say I got a backlash on almost every cast. I was out at Elk Grove park for about two hours and I think that by the time I left I had got the whole thumbing thing down. However I must say baitcasting is quite different that the spinning reels I'm used to.

pwbuilding
08-03-2005, 07:41 PM
GO BACK TO THE SPINNING REELS

krzyfshrmn
08-03-2005, 08:05 PM
What kind of reel are you casting? Bait casters are great once you get the hang of it. Most of the newer reels have a magnetic brakeing system that you can fine tune, along with a tension adjustment on the side of the reel.

Bassassin
08-03-2005, 08:58 PM
When you are first starting out, adjust the tension knob to the weight of the lure you are throwing. To do so; hold the rod in your hand while your arm is at a 90 degree angle, release the spool and when your lure hits the ground there shouldn't be excessive overrun. By not completely freeing up the reel you give yourself greater room for error.

A backlash is essentially caused by the spool traveling faster than whatever you are throwing. Eventually you will 'educate' your thumb to the point it controls the spool ensuring it doesn't reach a greater speed than the lure you just threw. When you do, you can reduce the tension knob completely and really throw the things a long ways.

Remember even the best bait casters get some overrun or a backlash occassionally. Some conditions are tougher than others too; throwing small lures into a 20mph wind with a baitcaster...tough stuff even for a well schooled user...

Wolf74
08-03-2005, 09:29 PM
Yep, I started using my thumb more effectivly near the end of my practice. It did reduce the backlash quite a bit thankfully. I'd go back to spinning, but I dont want to limit myself to just one type of method. Not to mention that I got a pretty good reel that I want to take advantage of ;D Its just a matter of getting used to.

HighSierra_Drifter
08-03-2005, 10:57 PM
When I first began using a baitcaster I found it easier to start with a heavier lure and less whip with the rod until you get the hang of it. Then you can lighten up the baits and whip the rod after getting the feel first...and don't forget to adjust the freespin like Bassassin said ;)

Drifter

FishinFool408
08-04-2005, 07:37 AM
Yup, practice makes perfect! Well, not exactly perfect, but close enough! ;D

FreshwaterFrank
08-04-2005, 10:52 AM
Spinning reels were invented because level-wind baitcasters are such a ##!^&^$@@!! to use, and no advantages in compensation. Why fight progress? Your level wind is a great trolling reel, but a 40 year old Mitchell 300 is a better casting reel. A $5 Zebco is a better baitcaster. Join the 21st century & buy a spinning reel for bait-casting.

randyfishing
08-04-2005, 12:33 PM
Hmm, I got a baitcaster last winter for fishing steelhead, wanted a heavier reel with a little muscle. However I had a time with the bugger, spun it up and got a really nasty line cut trying to pull it out, just about lost a digit (finger that is). I can't seem to cast very far either, even with the heavy rigs. I will be using it again this season because I lost too much chrome last year on my lil zebco. I personally hate the spinning reels with the bail and all that. I have a nice shimano that I never use. I seem to always go back to the casting reel, love the thumb button and can cast a kastmaster across the river into the willows if I am not careful. I am gonna keep working on the baitcaster - hey, ghostfishslayer uses them very successfully, I spotted them in his pix from last year. Guess it all boils down to user preference eh? ;)

sehoner
08-04-2005, 01:15 PM
well i started fishing with spinning reels. about a year ago, when i started fishing with 2q and his dad, i started using baitcasters. ive learned some things.

1- u can cast farther with a bait caster.
2- spinning reels are more acurate at casting.
3- line weight must match lure wieght and by that i mean its easier to cast a 1/2oz with 8lb than 15lb test.
4- when bait fishing on land or boat, baitcaster is the only way to go. click,click,click.
5- u will burn ur thumb with a baitcaster.
6- drag system is better in my opinoin on a baitcatser.
7- less line twist on a baitcaster.
8- backlash teaches u patience.
9- easier to maintain a baicaster.
10-baitcasters just look cool. like those guys on oln. u too can be a fishin pro!

jus my too sense..... ;)

BassFooler
08-04-2005, 01:38 PM
My first 6 months of daily practice with a baitcaster was done on my front lawn-
sehoner is right about all aspects of baitcasters-
I just feel that I have all around better control- but its that whole control thing... if you can consistently control your spool overrun and avoid backlashes more than 90% of the time- you will eventually find your spinning reel and your 'backup'. IMO.
As much as I love my dozen baitcasters-
my spinning reels are just tooooo easy to use- after all- isnt fishing supposed to be work? (at least thats what I tell my wife!!) ;D

Wolf74
08-04-2005, 02:46 PM
Well its not like I'm fighting progress. I have 5 rods all with spinning reels and just one with a baitcaster. Its true, after using both I must say that using a spinning reel is MUCH more easy, but still, change can be good.

BassFooler
08-04-2005, 03:07 PM
my first few weeks, I WAS fighting progress!!! I had my bcaster in the trash can on more than one occasion...until I'd watch Jimmy Houston on TV...then I'd be right back on it. I think all in all it comes down to preference and comfort.

STURGEONSTOMPER
08-04-2005, 03:11 PM
When you are first starting out, adjust the tension knob to the weight of the lure you are throwing. To do so; hold the rod in your hand while your arm is at a 90 degree angle, release the spool and when your lure hits the ground there shouldn't be excessive overrun. By not completely freeing up the reel you give yourself greater room for error.

A backlash is essentially caused by the spool traveling faster than whatever you are throwing. Eventually you will 'educate' your thumb to the point it controls the spool ensuring it doesn't reach a greater speed than the lure you just threw. When you do, you can reduce the tension knob completely and really throw the things a long ways.

Remember even the best bait casters get some overrun or a backlash occassionally. Some conditions are tougher than others too; throwing small lures into a 20mph wind with a baitcaster...tough stuff even for a well schooled user...



Smater then the average bear ;D

sehoner
08-04-2005, 04:30 PM
...until I'd watch Jimmy Houston on TV... .


see i told ya! ;D

fishrman4life
08-05-2005, 12:12 AM
spinning reels are my preference cuz thats what i learned on... :)

kstone44
08-05-2005, 12:35 AM
Like most I started out with the old zebco then moved on to the spinning reels except for catfishing and stripper fishing. Back then we did not have all this magnetic / centrifical engaged....... over run systems on our reels. We learned to thumb them which at times could be painful :P .Nowadays the reels are so user freindly that all it takes is a little patience ,you might find out that like me a baitcaster is much easier to use than a spinning setup. Spinning rods have line twist problems, heavier line means much larger reels or restricted distance. Another thing is that the line comming off of the spinning reel comes of in rolls that are funneled through the guides until it is straight there by damaging your line.On my bait caster reels I can use 6-20lb test on the same set up without any problems . try that with a spinning set up, they are much less versatile.Stick with it and in the long run you'll get it.

troutfan
08-05-2005, 02:36 AM
I have used spinning reels to catch everything from trout to tuna and wouldn't use baitcasters for my needs. 8)

Bassassin
08-05-2005, 06:50 AM
Smater then the average bear ;D

LOL...we all have our moments. ;D

LingSlayer
08-05-2005, 11:49 AM
I suggest you put in the time to learn how to use a baitcaster. Once you get it, it's on!

I LOVE my baitcaster. I practiced with a 5 gallon bucket in my backyard for a few months, that really helped. Once you get past the backlashes and get it configured right, there is no turning back!

LS

sehoner
08-05-2005, 04:03 PM
for all to know...........

in my opinion. the easiest way to learn to use a baitcaster, is on the water. the faster moving the water is the better. u can cast out using only a weight. 1-2 oz is enough. let the current take some line out, then reel bask up. this helps in keeping tension in the line as u reel up. loose line is far more prone to backlash and "loop" than taught line. secondly, if u do happen to backlash,birdsnest or whatever, u can strip line off and let the current take it with ease. that way u wont have a pile of line at ur feet, which will be prone to twisting and knotting. this wil help u in locating and identifying the main "loop" or "loops" that are causing u to lock up. once located, pull on loop, one loop at a time. pull until taught and then strip line. then move on to the next loop if necessary. if u have and u probably will, a nest that is deep from whatever stupid thing u have done, turning off click before u lock it back down. not thumbing right. loose line. accidently switching to freespool while setting the hook or whatever. all these things u must do. and will do. trust me. if all else fails and u cannot find the loop because its too deep or there are too many. start cuttin loops, one at a time, strip and repeat as necessary. just so u know everyone has screwed up majorly with a baitcaster. anyone that hasnt is related to god, or lying. when i first started usin them, i would take a spare reel out fishin, because it was garaunteed that i would screw one up very badly. and lets not waste fishin time. switch out and fish, work on the other while ur fishin. i really hope this helps. and i hope u have someone with u that knows what to do if u dont. good luck! ;D

metalmouth
08-05-2005, 05:40 PM
Before you start go out to a sewing store and buy a #2 or small crochet hook. When you backlash, and you will backlash, roll the spool backwards slowly with your thumb and find the largest horizontal cross of line under several wraps of line. Gently dig down under the wraps of line going the right direction and grab the cross line with the crochet hook, pull gently up to surface and see if your line will exit the reel. *Repeat this process as needed until your line will unspool and removes all of the backlashed loops.
Before you cast your reel the first time add 1 oz. of weight. Push the release button while maintaining contact with the spool with your thumb. The weight should gently descend to the ground. If the weight runs faster than a slow descent tighten the tension knob on the side of your reel until the descent is a slow drop to the ground. While learning you want to adjust this tension every time you change weights. The slower the descent the fewer backlashes you will have while learning.
Do not learn to cast in a continuous motion. Start by casting a side arm style before you attempt an overhead cast. Move your pole in back of you and come to a stop if you try to go from in front of you to your backcast and forward again without thumb practice you will have a serious birdsnest. From a full back position press your release button with your thumb on the spool. Your fist few cast you will want to release your thumb and then make contact with the thumb before your weight makes it to it's destination. This will prevent the spool from overrunning and another backlash. Medium length cast and always stopping or slowing the spool with your thumb before the weight reaches it's destination. Within a few hours you should be able to release all but one of the magnetic brakes inside the reel and be casting like a pro. Practice makes perfect, however I carry three reels with me at all times just in case and I have been casting bait casters for 25 years. Best of luck and tight lines. Don
By the way if you run into trouble P.M. me and I'll help you out, until you can run 100 yards of line down a river and never lose contact with your weight. ;D 8) ;D

hitdog777
08-05-2005, 07:52 PM
"Within a few hours you should be able to release all but one of the magnetic brakes inside the reel"

I recently bought a shimano curado and I'm learning how to use it. I get the clutch bar, I get the tention adjustment on the side and I get the thumbing of the spool.....but I don't get the whole brake system. What do you do with this feature and when?

Thanks

blue_chrush
08-06-2005, 07:49 PM
correct me if I'm wrong...
but the record for casting is been by a levelwind...
the record is about 264yds...thats about 794ft :o
thats long.....

and there is an unoffical throw of 902ft...
it was not certified by the correct line tho....

http://uksf.sea-angler.org/PaulKerry.JPG

sehoner
08-06-2005, 07:56 PM
ya but i dont think wolf is ready to compete yet crush.......i mean its not to say that he doesnt have it in him,but when i backlash my rig usually only gets about 30ft off the shore. hehe lol. but jus keep on keepin on wolf someday ull be able to throw a 2oz ball 200 ft no sweat. then we'll go out and buy u an official competition rig!

wayneo
08-06-2005, 08:01 PM
You get used to them then you forget about spinner ;D

metalmouth
08-07-2005, 07:37 AM
Magnetic brakes will allow you to cast short distances without backlash. Since I've never met a fisherman who didn't think the fishing was better on the opposite bank, magnetic brakes can be a problem. Magnetic braking systems stop the freespool of line before the weight reaches the end of the cast. To compensate for this, fisheman will put a little extra Umph into thier cast. By flexing the pole harder you are actually running the spool faster than the line is leaving it, causing yet another backlash. In order to attain better distance with less resistance, you can open up most reels and uncheck several of the magnetic brakes allowing you to cast further and cleaner without overstressing your pole to reel combination. ;D

Wolf74
08-07-2005, 02:44 PM
Yea, I got the Curado too. It seems like I pretty much got the hang of it casting at least. I practiced going to the park and just casting out with a weight. I went fishing a couple of times now and didn't have much of a problem anymore. I"ve mastered the whole thumbing thing so thats really helped alot. Usualy I just backlash once or twice a trip now when I go. But like Hitdog, I'm still a little unsure about the magnetic breaks. Right now I have most of them set, but I think I'm going to disengage them to see if I can get more distance. The thumbing should keep me from backlashing, hopefully.

innovate
08-07-2005, 08:49 PM
I grew up fishing with my Dad off the beaches of Pacifica for Surf Stripers. Conventional/Baitcast Reels will outcast a spinning reel as far as distance goes. Period. However, spinning reels beat out baitcasters when you're going light.

Ever watch the guys fishing the B.A.S.S. and Bassmaster tournaments? Jigs, Texas Rigged Worms, Spinnerbaits, Buzzbaits and Cranks will all be thrown using a baitcaster, where as smaller presentations like drop-shotting, darter-head worming will done using a spinning reel.

It all really depends on what type of application and situation you're in on the water that determines what reel is better to use over the other.

fishrman4life
08-08-2005, 12:50 AM
i grew up spinning, caught fish spinning, and gonna keep spinning till i die

wow, im getting dizzy already ;D ;D ;D

The_Big_Sinus
08-10-2005, 06:14 PM
My basic rules of thumb, so to speak:

I use baitcasters for spoons and jigs over 1 oz, and plugs over 1.5 oz. Spinning for lures up to 3/4 of an oz. I can cheat about 1/4 oz. either way. I'm a remedial baticaster, so this keeps things simple and lets me thumb heavy with the mag brakes on full.

I use the "slow descent" rule on the friction adjuster. If it's just tight enough that the lure breaks free, then that's where I want it.

Didn't know that any shimanos came with mag brakes- thought they all had centrifugal brakes ??? So far as I know only abus and daiwas had mag brakes.

If you want to really rip distance casts, tough to beat a reel with no levelwind. Start with something that weighs at least 2 oz., and use a a muskie rod, or some other super stiff one piece- you can go for the Hatteras Heaver later...

My problem with beefy, HD Surf spinning rigs is that if the line catches on anything (a guide, part of the reel, etc.), you are watching you lure/rig part from it and head for orbit...

Anyway- I'm not the king of casting. Far from it. But, this is what works for me.

sunracer1957
08-11-2005, 10:17 AM
I have yet to master the baitcaster, but when fishing with some of the other guys, they are the way to go as far as I've seen,, Mr_t, 916 , Krzy, SS, mjonesjr, all these guys can make em sail with little or no effort at all, one day I'll get the hang of it,, but as it stands I'm the backlash king, well maybe not my son is worse at it than me :-/

I'm he## with the downriggers though ;)

PlugROCKSTAR
08-11-2005, 10:45 AM
I have yet to master the baitcaster, but when fishing with some of the other guys, they are the way to go as far as I've seen,, Mr_t, 916 , Krzy, SS, mjonesjr, all these guys can make em sail with little or no effort at all, one day I'll get the hang of it,, but as it stands I'm the backlash king, well maybe not my son is worse at it than me :-/

I'm he## with the downriggers though ;)

tell them the story bout' almost spooling Stompers TR200 at Montezuma on almost every cast ;D and how 916 untangled BigT's super birds nest >:(

metalmouth
08-11-2005, 11:26 AM
Man the temp is over a 100 and it suddenly gets coldddd out. Cruel Shoes. ;D :o ;D

sunracer1957
08-11-2005, 11:48 AM
Yes 916 can rip a mean cast and when it comes to birdsnest, he tackled one I thought was never coming out, the spool spit line out like you just cut open a golf ball, the stuff was everywhere, but 916 sat around while fishing and saved the day,, glad he did cause I just had the spool refilled,, thanx 916 AGAIN

PlugROCKSTAR
08-11-2005, 03:50 PM
Yes 916 can rip a mean cast and when it comes to birdsnest, he tackled one I thought was never coming out, the spool spit line out like you just cut open a golf ball, the stuff was everywhere, but 916 sat around while fishing and saved the day,, glad he did cause I just had the spool refilled,, thanx 916 AGAIN

see what i do for you old guys ;D LMFAO Tom. :-*

Sardine
08-11-2005, 06:12 PM
This is a good topic. I too would like to know how it's done. I can cast an ocean city reel out into the surf all day & not get a backlash. But if I try to put a light trout or bass lure on to my bass or trolling units, it don't work. You can't cast them for carp. Backlash is not the problem, I can thumb it all day, distance is the problem. Only way I can get a decent cast with a light weight lure is with a spinning reel. * >:( * * Help! * :) *BTW I'm older than dirt. They haven't made "ocean city" reels for a long time but they sure were nice.

stripehype
08-12-2005, 06:30 AM
One thing about baitcasting reels is that once you get the hang of it, it is much more accurate for casting. You can pitch underhand, side arm, whatever, and you don't need to worry about setting the bail or controlling line twist like a spinning set up. Stick with it and in the long run you will be a believer!