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Vance Staplin
11-02-2005, 06:16 PM
Hi Folks,

A while back there was a thread about replacing downrigger cable with the new "Spectra" lines to eliminate cable humm.

There as quite a lot of feed back if I remember correctly.

I was just glancing through the new 2006 Scotty products catalog and found that they are introducing a new Downrigger line made of spectra.

They also are introducing locking systems for their downriggers. Now that is something they should have had years ago!!

Hope this helps

Vance

Mickey_Thomas
11-02-2005, 07:28 PM
I wonder how the spectra will be affected by salt water? And being able to lock my riggers sure would be nice. Where can I get one of those catalogs? Thanks for the info Vance. ;)

SalmonHunter
11-02-2005, 07:42 PM
mickey http://www.scotty.com/ they have the new items on their site ;)

Erreck
11-02-2005, 09:05 PM
They also are introducing locking systems for their downriggers. Now that is something they should have had years ago!!


Good idea! I wish the fish finder companies would do something similar. :-/

Vance Staplin
11-02-2005, 10:23 PM
Mickey,

I ran spectra out there (in the ocean)a few years back. I ran some pretty thin stuff and it cut the grass and sea weed instead of stacking up on the cable. I don't remember it cutting Jelly fish but now that I think of it, it should.

I don't know how thick the Scotty brand will be. But I know there will be no downrigger hum.

The next question is black box. This new stuff will definutly create neutral voltage, particularly with a coated ball. (no coated balls jokes please!)

Vance

Mickey_Thomas
11-03-2005, 07:30 AM
Thanks SalmonHunter, and Vance, cutting seaweed could be a plus, guess I'll consider it when I need to replace my wire ;)

Off_The_Hook
11-03-2005, 08:23 AM
Thanks for the info Vance. I will probably be purchasing both. Since I never take my downriggers off, I have been waiting for a way to lock them down.

Maz
11-03-2005, 10:28 AM
Hey Vance,
When running Spectra on my downriggers, should I remove all of the exsiting cable, or just put apply add the spectra on top of the wire cable.
Maz

Vance Staplin
11-03-2005, 10:32 AM
Hi guy's

I thumbed through the Scotty catalog some more and found that they also came out with some "Snubbers".

I think the Snubbers would make it easier to bring the weight in and out of the boat, control the shock of the weight bouncing and eliminate bad voltage.

Vance

drstressor
11-03-2005, 10:39 AM
Those snubbers are standard commercial salmon trolling gear in BC. They reduce the frequency of the wire cable snapping as the gear is pulled on board. The only thing I don't like about them is the steel coast lock clips at the end. Attaching the weight is much more difficult that when using the plastic Scotty clip.

fish4fun
11-04-2005, 05:04 AM
I think we'll lose the black box ability to set a voltage that will attract fish if we use non-conductive spectra. For instance, my boat and my friend's boat both have a "natural" voltage that isn't ideal. Our voltages aren't so bad that they repel fish, but they aren't in the range to attract them either. That's the advantage of the black box on a wire downrigger cable. I'm going to stick with the wire cable and the black box because I'm not really bothered that much by the cable hum.

Good New about the downrigger locks. Scotty's been working on this for a couple of years. Looks like they've finally done it.. Larry

Mickey_Thomas
11-04-2005, 05:35 AM
I agree Larry, we have to keep those Cannon owners from stealing our Scottys ;D ;D ;D ::) :P

Mickey_Thomas
11-04-2005, 06:56 AM
Doc wrote this on the Classified Section, so I thought I'd put it here for all to read.


If you eliminate the wire cable, there will be no potential difference between the spectra line and the zincs on the boat. This is a good thing for boats that have a bad natural voltage. This will eliminate the "need" for a black box on most boats. But you won't be able to take advantage of the fish attracting capability of a properly set up electromagnetic field. Setting up a box to attract fish is a whole lot more difficult than fixing a bad natural voltage problem. Despite what they say in the manual, there is no ideal voltage that attracts different species of fish. If you set up between 600 and 650 mV, you won't repel fish, but you won't necessarily attract them either. I have had experiences where changing the voltage from 620 mV to 630 mV seemed to make a big difference. Other days, 600 mV seemed to be the ticket. And on 2 occasions I had a school of kokanee follow me around with the box on the "pulse" setting (most boxes won't do this). Other times the same setting had no effect.

After puzzling over this for years and reading everything I could, I finally asked a researcher at Oregon State who works on fish sensory perception. He explained to me something that I should have been able to figure out by myself. While specific voltage settings will attract predatory fish by mimicking the output of a school of baitfish, the actual voltage difference is not consistent along the length of the wire. The box measures the voltage along the length of the wire where the conductivity of the water is the greatest. It is not consistent along the entire length of the wire. While controlled lab tests with pure water have shown that the difference is no more than 10 mV between 0 ft and 100 ft, the real world situation is very different. The charge along the wire is determined by the conductivity of the water column which is not uniform in a lake or in the ocean. Conductivity is greatest in regions of high biological activity such as depths where a plankton bloom is going on. Living organisms leak ions with make the local conductivity higher. So if you have a plankton bloom going on in the top 10 ft of water, a setting of 620 mV will only reflect the charge of the wire in the top 10 ft. The actual voltage drop at 100 ft could be only 500 mV. Only if the conductivity of the entire water column is the same would you get the same voltage drop all along the wire.

So what does this mean in a practical sense? Well it means that you need to experiment with the black box setting every day and at different times during the day. I have not completely figured this out, but it "seems" that on bright days with an algae or diatom bloom going on near the surface, you need to use a higher voltage setting to attract fish at greater depths. And because biological activity increases with light intensity, increasing the voltage as the sun gets higher would seem to be a good idea.

You can't simply expect to be able to dial in a voltage that is going to attract a given species of fish on any given day. And if you use a setback of 20 ft or more, the box will have little of no effect on your fishing.

Vance Staplin
11-04-2005, 02:30 PM
Thanks for posting that Mickey, I'm still up in the air when it comes to black boxes myself.

I have friends that wouldn't leave home without one and then there is guy's that have them and don't see a difference.

Vance

drstressor
11-04-2005, 04:52 PM
I like to put a clip on the line a few feet above the ball in order to cut down on snags. Can you do this with braided cable? Also, can you stack with braid?

Vance Staplin
11-04-2005, 08:47 PM
Doc,

Being that the braids are nothing more than fishing line. I just tied small swivels into the braid and then attatched releases with standard duo-lock snaps to the eye of the swivel for stacking.

It worked great.

Vance

drstressor
11-05-2005, 05:48 AM
Good idea! :)

fishwithgary
11-07-2005, 09:44 AM
Thanks for all the info. That hummin sound has always been irritating.
Gary.

Mickey_Thomas
11-07-2005, 01:14 PM
Vance, doesn't putting a swivel in line to hook your clips too interfear with the auto-shutoff feature on Scotty's? especially if your stacking and tie a swivel 10' above the bottom one.

Vance Staplin
11-07-2005, 03:11 PM
HI Mickey,

Good question. The answer is yes if you use too large of a swivel. I used "Spro" swivels because they are incredibly strong and very small.

Vance

Off_The_Hook
11-07-2005, 09:02 PM
What do you use for the auto shut off with spectra? It dosen't look like the plastic Scotty stops we use with the cable will work with the spectra.

Mike

Vance Staplin
11-08-2005, 09:50 AM
Hi Mike,

We are used to dealing with stainless so these questions come up.

The Spectra is very forgiving because it is basically fishing line and we use knots instead of crimps. *The first time I put spectra line on I just tied a bead on the line to trip the stop switch. *The second time I just doubled the line through the Scotty stop. *It worked fine.

Vance

Vance Staplin
11-08-2005, 06:11 PM
I did some research(called the Scotty Rep). He say's the folks at Scotty use the factory stop. The line they are using is large enough in diameter to work properly with their stops.

Hope this helps

Vance

Off_The_Hook
11-08-2005, 10:43 PM
Thanks Vance