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View Full Version : 2 stroke outboards or 4 ?????



firetrout
09-19-2005, 02:50 PM
I am about to purchase a crestliner with a 10 year old Johnson 115 v4 outboard.

My question is, will the fish and game soon be trying to "outlaw" these on most freswater lakes soon?
I have heard lots of talk back and forth? Whatsss up?
Thanks,

FishMischief
09-19-2005, 04:10 PM
When I bought my boat this year I did some looking into this issue. Its up the California Air Resources Board not the DFG. As I remember in 1998 they ruled that after 2001 that engines which mix oil and fuel could no longer be sold in California. 2 strokes do exist now that do not mix oil and fuel. They also ruled that "Bans" on 2 strokes would be decided by the governing body of each body of water. Since then Tahoe has banned 2 strokes which do not meet emission standards. Some others have as well.

There is no Ban on 2 strokes specifically in California and no talk of it that I have seen. If the body of water allows the engine you can use it.

Envirnmentally it would be better to get a four stroke.

Beaver13
09-19-2005, 04:30 PM
A four stroke will save a little on gas and you can fish any lake with no ?.

firetrout
09-20-2005, 07:51 AM
Thanks guys for the info on this subject. ;)

bluestar
09-20-2005, 11:50 AM
A technical question: How exactly does a 2 stroke impact the environment? Does it create harmful fumes? Does oil leak into water?

Other than environmental concern, strictly mechanically (power, feul efficiency, durability, weight, etc), how does a 2 stroke compare to a 4 stroke?

FishMischief
09-20-2005, 12:35 PM
I believe the major imapct is that like 30% or more of the fuel is exhauseted (unburned) into the water.

I'll let someone else do the performance.

drstressor
09-20-2005, 12:38 PM
Older 2-strokes (pre-direct injection) pump as much as 1/4 of the fuel and oil they use out the exhaust in an unburned state. They put a lot of hydrocarbons into a lake in addition to fuel additives (like MMTB). The also produce more than 100 times the air pollution per gallon of fuel when compared with a modern car engine.

4-stroke engines and the newest direct injection 2-strokes burn about half as much fuel at cruise when compared to older 2-strokes. They are also much smoother and quieter.

sellhomes2fish
09-20-2005, 01:40 PM
Are the direct injection outboards comparable to 4-strokes regarding fuel economy. Also, what is the likelihood that direct injection motors will be banned in the future in favor of 4-strokes? I like the power-to-weight ratios of the direct injection motors but worry about their future.

drstressor
09-20-2005, 02:24 PM
So far, they meet all of the proposed emission standards. The new Evinrude and Mercs seem to have fuel economy comparable with the 4-strokes. The only reservations I have about them is that they are new. The outboard industry has a long history of bringing new technologies to the marketplace that turn out poorly. All of the 4-strokes are rock solid because they are built around small engine, motorcycle, and automotive technology that had been around a long time.

Rusty_Hooks
09-20-2005, 03:12 PM
Keep your eye on this site...

These new E-Tec engines are doing very well......

I'm like doc....hesitant for the moment....but

they look real good so far.... ;)

http://www.evinrude.com/en-US/

I should probably sell these things ;D ::)

Hopsmacker
09-20-2005, 03:44 PM
FireTrout: Congrats on your pre-boat purchase.

Also, just a quick note on lakes that prohibit the use of 2-stroke motors. The only reservoir that I know of is San Pablo Reservoir. In fact, they prohibit even having a 2-stroke on your transom, even if it is out of the water.

dandeuce
09-21-2005, 09:37 PM
Can't say things have not changed in the past few years , but when I bought my boat/motor in Yuba City a few years back I was told that any motor over 10 HP had to be a 4 stroke in the higher Mt. lakes . Want to say I was told the elevation was above 4000 feet but I don't remember . The guy at the boat shop may have been BSing me as to sell a 4 stroke but I doubt it as I told him right off I wanted a 4 stroke . Sure is nice to troll and not have a cloud follow you around the lake .

Dan

Durb
09-21-2005, 10:49 PM
Can't say things have not changed in the past few years , but when I bought my boat/motor in Yuba City a few years back I was told that any motor over 10 HP had to be a 4 stroke in the higher Mt. lakes . Want to say I was told the elevation was above 4000 feet *but I don't remember . The guy at the boat shop may have been BSing me as to sell a 4 stroke but I doubt it as I told him right off I wanted a 4 stroke . Sure is nice to troll and not have a cloud follow you around the lake .

Dan

I would have to say he was giving you a story. Maybe a limited amount of lakes but not all. Things likely will change in the future though. I recently sold my last boat with a 40hp 2 stroke. It ran out good when running across the lake. When trolling I started feeling guilty. Enjoying the clean crisp mountain air with a smoke cloud coming out the back. :P I bought another boat with a four stroke. When I was selling the last one that was one of the first questions that was asked. "Is it a four stroke? " The four stoke boats sure cost more. Especially in CA. Fire Trout don't be afraid to look out of state. You can save quite a bit of money if you find the right deal. ;)

fish4fun
09-21-2005, 11:09 PM
Getting back to Firetrout's question about any kind of a statewide ban on 2-strokes. The answer is "NO". The CARB ratings and requirements are for new motors being sold in CA. So, any motors sold next year will have to meet the CARB 2006 requirements. The newer 2-strokes from Mercury and Evinrude will meet these requirements as will all the 4-strokes sold by Mercury, Johnson, Yamaha, Honda, Suzuki, Nissan, etc. CARB is only controlling the sales of new motors in the state. It is not banning older motors.

However, local lakes can decide what type of motors they will allow on their lakes. Lakes like San Pablo started requiring 4-strokes only a couple of years ago. I believe Lake Tahoe requires has required newer 2-strokes or 4-strokes. There are a few other lakes that are requiring cleaner motors and banning the older 2-strokes. But at the present time, the old carbeurated 2-strokes are still allowed on the vast majority of lakes. When and how fast this may change is really unknown. If it does change, it will only be decided on a lake by lake basis. Each lake independently deciding what it will allow.. Larry