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GrandpaKeys
11-23-2009, 01:24 PM
This is completely new to me ... Does anyone have experience casting snares for dungys from the beach?
More than 50 years ago, as a 10 year old, I was taken fishing with my uncle for stripers off the beach at the Great Highway in SF. As an incidental catch, Uncle pulled in a nice dungeness crab that wouldn't let go of the bait. We built a small driftwood fire and cooked the crab right there. It was the best tasting crab I ever had! Or so I thought at the time. :) It was one of those time, place and circumstance events that I never forgot. Ignoring that we probably broke several laws, I'd like to try to recreate the experience with my grandson.

I have access to the beach south of Aptos (the Manresa State Beach area). Do I have a chance trying there? Do tides make a difference? Any infomation would be appreciated...
Thanks in advance

Ptack
11-23-2009, 04:23 PM
Its always worth the try, I too have caught a crab perching, so they are out there. I havnt personally crabbed in aptos though.

bigeasy8240
11-24-2009, 04:54 AM
There's a very good chance of some nice ones near Manressa Beach. Long flat sandy areas with a snare is a very good idea! 8-) Good luck out there and stuffit with chovies (snare). 8-)

anathema_tide
11-25-2009, 03:56 AM
I like to go to Doran Beach for crabbing/ fishing off the jetty. I was fishing 1 day using squid and I was pulling in 6-7 inchers all day out of the middle of the bodega harbor channel. Up and down the Jetty you have guys crabbing that were only getting small ones (3-5 inchers) and 1 guy set his nets out in fromnt of me because out of the 20 or so I pulled in. But I only was able to get 4 of them to me. he and I were very happy to share the same spot.

Sin_Coast
11-25-2009, 05:22 AM
You can potentially catch crab from the beach w/a crab snare. However, you will not catch any legal dungies from shore near Aptos. Unfortunately they are much deeper down here (like 150-250ft). But if you move up the coast a bit, your chances will go up a lot. Like from HMB north. Squid and sardines in the snare. Good luck!

FishnBeer
11-25-2009, 05:28 AM
in my experience chunks of fish seem to work best for bait. when i was crabbin last week in tomales, one guy was haulin em in with the remnants of a striper after being fillet'd. the guys usin chicken and squid didnt get squat . our mackerel worked ok

anathema_tide
11-25-2009, 05:49 AM
I usually mix my crab bait up 1 on squid 1 on anchovies or other fish, and i have had luck on both at the same time.

montanabay
11-28-2009, 05:02 AM
this sounds fun, how would you rig it up? Straight swivel nap to the crab snare? Any weight?

I'd think that it would get rolled around alot in the surf, I wonder if you put a pyramid sinker inline (terminally) with the crab snare if it would keep flat on the sand, if you keep a little tension it seems it would keep it nice and level.

this is the only style I've seen (http://www.histackleboxshop.com/ProductDetails.asp?ProductCode=Promar-AC-333) is there anything else worth a shot?

Cheers,

Josh

GrandpaKeys
11-28-2009, 05:12 AM
You can potentially catch crab from the beach w/a crab snare. However, you will not catch any legal dungies from shore near Aptos.

Are you saying that dungys travel in 'packs' of the same size??* Do they hang out and grow in the same area?* Does that mean that in time Aptos will have packs of legal crabs?* Or do they then move off to deeper water??* Hmmm.. so many questions.... :o

GrandpaKeys
11-28-2009, 05:21 AM
Great questions montanabay. Ditto... How do you rig the snares?

I'm looking at a surf rod and reel? Any recommendations? Length? 12 foot rod overkill? For what it costs for a 'good' surf rod and reel, you could feed a lot of crab lovers.

GKeys

CDK
11-28-2009, 10:41 AM
Here is a post on making your own from earlier post on subject http://www.fishsniffer.com/cgi-bin/forumsyabb/YaBB.pl?num=1244527737

GrandpaKeys
11-28-2009, 12:13 PM
Thanks for the link. VERY informative -- learned a lot.

montanabay
11-29-2009, 01:13 AM
they sell the bait cages for really cheap, like $2 at most bait shops, they even have them at the Berkeley Marina, but I like the DIY snag part, you could quickly modify a bait cage to a snare style.

although, I think most bait shops have the snare traps for sale, for pretty cheap, like $4-5.

Ptack
11-29-2009, 12:15 PM
That was me with the DIY snares, feel free to ask some questions.

I put 5-6 oz of pyramid or bank or flat sinkers in the bottom of mine to keep them still. Helps to wing em out there too.

Bait wise, i had good luck with chicken last time I was at Crissy Fields, and Squid/Chovie mix worked well in pacifica with some mackarel thrown in too.

FishnBeer
11-30-2009, 07:44 AM
I'm looking at a surf rod and reel?* Any recommendations?* Length?* 12 foot rod overkill?*

GKeys



i got a 12ft shakespear "arsenal" rod+reel combo from castro valley bait+tackle for $65. i think 13-14 ft is optimal, my buddy got a 15' rod after i got my 12' and that is too much... it feels like i loose a bit of umph due to extra length+weight. with the 12 it feels like i could go slightly bigger. thats what works for me anyway... maybe i just need to hit the gym!

when i was at sports authority they had rods only around $50 for 13-15 footers. you can put any old reel on there just make sure you can stuff enough line.

25lb mono is what i use. forget how many yds the reel takes but when you huck it just right there isnt a whole lot left on the spool ;D maybe time to switch to braided

Ptack
12-04-2009, 04:51 PM
Ive got a 9 ft shakespeare Alpha rod and real combo from fishermans wharehouse. Wasnt too expensive and that length works well for me.

Fish_R_Us
12-15-2009, 10:27 AM
I use (2) large SS snap swivels for connecting the mono line to the snare. I just don't feel comfortable using only one swivel. Check it out and see how heavy your snare (plus crab) gets when reeling against a current. My experience is usually a single crab per snare. They seem to be really defensive after jumping on top and warding off any intruders. When you are lucky enough to catch 2 crabs, this means that they were probably both fighting over the snare and neither had full control over it.

GrandpaKeys
12-15-2009, 11:17 AM
I use (2) large SS snap swivels for connecting the mono line to the snare.*
More great info.

Seems that I've been doing more thinking than fishing, lately.* I just bought a little snare (2X2) off the web.* Looks well built and sturdy and weighs just over 3 ounces. That raises a question.

If I pack it with 2 ounces of anchovies, I'm slinging about 5 ounces.* Do I need additional weight?* Someone suggested a 5 ounce pyramid sinker.* What's your recommendation??* More weight means a stouter rod - one that will handle more than 6 ounces of weight.* Am I on the right track in thinking about maybe a 13 foot rod as suggested by pyros?

CDK
12-15-2009, 11:33 AM
The chovies will be near weightless in the water. No tide would be OK but the more current the more weight needed. ;)

GrandpaKeys
12-15-2009, 12:35 PM
The chovies will be near weightless in the water.
Cal -- I'm talking about the weight tossing capability of the rod. Casting from shore, the snare, the anchovies all count against the ability to cast the tackle FAR. Is it necessary to add weight ? How much?? Is casting 10 ounces realistic?

GK

CDK
12-16-2009, 02:12 AM
I am thinking that keeping the trap from moving and tangling drifting up to shore and such would be the bigger problem.
C

GrandpaKeys
12-16-2009, 02:59 AM
I am thinking that keeping the trap from moving and tangling* drifting up to shore and such would be the bigger problem.
Agreed -- No argument there, Cal.. I'm wondering if I add a 5oz weight, what length pole would maximize casting distance.

bigeasy8240
12-16-2009, 03:07 AM
I use a 15ft Ugly Stick with a Penn 320GT! 6 ounce pyramid on the outside and if additional weight is required, stuff a couple of 2 oz, bullet weights with the bait and shoved the door closed and sling towards China! ;D.

I found that I do better slinging with my Ugly Stick Custom rod that's 7ft medium/heavy. More leverage and control.

CDK
12-16-2009, 06:12 AM
I have a 15 and a 13 and a 9 U S and the 9 is my go to jetty / surf rod now. More control I think.

GrandpaKeys
12-16-2009, 10:45 AM
That's more like it.... Thats the information I was trying to get.. Thanks Cal and bigeasy. Not so coincidently I checked out rods at Wild Sports today. A 12' rod is HUGE. I'm a good sized guy - I think I'd need to bulk up in order to heave it all morning. I'll go with your recommendation.

GK

bob13bob
03-02-2014, 09:31 PM
gonna Necro this thread as it seems to be most developed one I can find.


I've done enough crab snaring I feel I can add to the discussion here.


Crab snare - haven't found my favorite. The most annoying thing with snares is keeping the loops open. the best snares use thick mono lines for the snaring loops = stay open more often. The thinner loops suck in my experience.


Weight depends on current. I sometimes need up to add up to 6oz lead (Ocean beach current), add another few oz for cage + bait, which really sucks for casting and reeling. But it must have enough to not be tumbled around in the current. I attach the weight to the back with a snap swivel. I do not put the weight in the snare as it has tendency to escape the latches which are held shut with rubberbands on many snares.


Crabs have tremendous fight when snaring. They dig their claws in the sand. I'm cranking on the reel with maximum strength many times. They fight harder when pulled across the beach floor vs pulled up to a pier. If you get 2 keeper sized crabs on teh snare, which sometimes happens, you may get bruises on your thigh like I have.


Reel - use something large, beefy, and simple design = better quality for the dollar without needed features. I buy whatever Okuma size 50-65 reels on sale. The 65 barely fits the reel seat on my 10ft 2-4oz pole, so 55 is a safer bet for a smaller pole. The non bait feeder dual drag ones are cheaper. Crab snaring is very HARD on your reels (strong fight, salt water mists, sandy beach, etc). I've stripped my cheapie shakespear that came with the ugly stick combo. Rubberband your bail to make sure it stays shut during casting. Snapped my rod learning that lesson.



If you got crabbing at night, baitcasters are poor chance casting in the dark. I think the wind casting alone is enough reason to to totally exclude bait casters.


Rod - I've used 9ft and 12ft. 12ft gets my more distance and they tend to be specced to higher weight. Use whatever length you like, but make sure it's a beefy rod to sling weight. You do not need to sensitivity to action your bait. Keep in mind, the longer rod also gives the crab more leverage when fighting you.


Line. For slinging that much weight you need to use mono shockleader. I use 20lb braid tied to 40lb 30' shockleader. You might be inclined to use 50-60lb leader if you're stronger and are breaking off, combined with a 30lb braid. I learned and practiced the albright special knot to tie them. with 20lb braid to 40lb mono, I find 17 loops of braid, and one simple loop on the mono side to pass through your rod guides better.
*IMPORTANT Make sure your albright specials are good knots (test them in your house), if tied poorly they will break as I have learned.


Cast. Due to people presence, there are many times I do not feel comfortable doing a full OTG distance cast rotation. Slinging lead bullets in a 12 ft rod + 5ft line arc to get max distance. Sometimes i settle for straight over the head cast.

GrandpaKeys
03-04-2014, 09:11 PM
Very thorough and thoughtful reply. Much appreciated.
Since the original post, I've actually managed to catch about a half dozen crabs - two of which were male and legal sized - both at Ocean Beach.

I agree on loop line size - the cheap snares have weeny line - the better snares have thick weed wacker mono. I first used a cube trap that I lost on the first cast when the too small snap swivel failed. I now use locking snaps. The cube seemed to not be aerodynamic and lost potential casting distance. I now use a torpedo-type snare with a built in weight. It casts well and retrieves much easier.

I've got a lot to learn - still a novice. Much more practice needed. Again thanks for the contribution


gonna Necro this thread as it seems to be most developed one I can find.

I've done enough crab snaring I feel I can add to the discussion here.

Crab snare - haven't found my favorite. The most annoying thing with snares is keeping the loops open. the best snares use thick mono lines for the snaring loops = stay open more often. The thinner loops suck in my experience.

Weight depends on current. I sometimes need up to add up to 6oz lead (Pacifica beach current), ad another few oz for cage + bait, which really sucks for casting and reeling. But it must have enough to not be tumbled around in the current. I attach the weight to the back with a snap swivel. I do not put the weight in the snare as it has tendency to escape the latches which are held shut with rubberbands on many snares.

Crabs have tremendous fight when snaring. They dig their claws in the sand. I'm cranking on the reel with maximum strength many times. They fight harder when pulled across the beach floor vs pulled up to a pier. If you get 2 keeper sized crabs on teh snare, which sometimes happens, you may get bruises on your thigh like I have.

Reel - use something large, beefy, and simple design = better quality for the dollar without needed features. I buy whatever Okuma size 50-65 reels on sale. The non bait feeder dual drag ones are cheaper. Crab snaring is very HARD on your reels (strong fight, salt water mists, sandy beach, etc). I've stripped my cheapie shakespear that came with the ugly stick combo.

If you got crabbing at night, baitcasters are poor chance casting in the dark. I think the wind casting alone is enough reason to to totally exclude bait casters.

Rod - I've used 9ft and 12ft. 12ft gets my more distance and they tend to be specced to higher weight. Use whatever length you like, but make sure it's a beefy rod to sling weight. You need to sensitivity to action your bait. Keep in mind, the longer rod also gives the crab more leverage when fighting you.

Line. For slinging that much weight you need to use mono shockleader. I use 20lb braid tied to 40lb 30' shockleader. You might be inclined to use 50-60lb leader if you're stronger and are breaking off with a 30lb braid. I learned and practiced the albright special knot to tie them. with 20lb braid to 40lb mono, I find 17 loops of braid, and one simple loop on the mono side to pass through your rod guides better.
*IMPORTANT Make sure your albright specials are good knots (test them in your house), if tied poorly they will break as I have learned.

Cast. Due to people presence, there are many times I do not feel comfortable doing a full OTG distance cast rotation. Slinging lead bullets in a 12 ft rod + 5ft line arc to get max distance. Sometimes i settle for straight over the head cast.

simplycook
03-04-2014, 09:22 PM
GrandpaKeys, whenever you're ready to hit up Bodega Bay or Baker again, I'm ready. I picked up some new snares that a local made. I want to see how his design compares against mine side by side.

Kevin

Odasan
03-06-2014, 11:12 AM
I have used rods from 10' to 13' for crab snaring. I have found that the 13' rod works best for me. More important than the rod is the shape of the snare. The 3" square snares do not cast well. I've found the 1 1/2" x 3" or 4" snares cast the best. I will add a weight to the end of the snare to help get distance. Depending on the snare and rod, I will add 3 to 5 oz pyramid or torpedo weights. You will find that braided line will cast farther than mono of the same test. Another advantage of braid is that it is much thinner than mono and will tend to be less effected by wave or current. Casting a heavy load with braid will normally cut your casting finger. To prevent this you can either tape your casting finger or use a shock leader. If you don't use a shock leader, make sure that your drag is tightened all the way down You do not want the drag to slip while casting, it will cut you to the bone. The inexpensive clip swivels will open under a load. Try using a Tactical Angler clip instead. They will not open. I have lost a lot of snares due to the bail closing during the cast and I have gone to a bailless reel (Penn SSV6500BLS) and never lost another snare. These reels have a great drag and are built like tanks. As far as bait, I do very well with squid and either anchovy or mackerel. For something that looks simple, it gets very involved. Hope this helps.

GrandpaKeys
03-06-2014, 01:20 PM
SC -- I picked up a "scupper" cart that I feel more confident with so... I'm saying .... pick the day .. PM me and I'm on the road. :-)


GrandpaKeys, whenever you're ready to hit up Bodega Bay or Baker again, I'm ready. I picked up some new snares that a local made. I want to see how his design compares against mine side by side.

Kevin

GrandpaKeys
03-06-2014, 01:31 PM
Thanks for the tips. I met a snare fisherman who showed me how to use a rubber band to insure the bail doesn't flip during a "manly" cast. He also used a bit of tape on his finger for protection ---. I use braid now for the very reasons you cite. All that is lacking for me is fishing time!! I'm ready to move from novice to junior apprentice. More time on the water needed.

GK





I have used rods from 10' to 13' for crab snaring. I have found that the 13' rod works best for me. More important than the rod is the shape of the snare. The 3" square snares do not cast well. I've found the 1 1/2" x 3" or 4" snares cast the best. I will add a weight to the end of the snare to help get distance. Depending on the snare and rod, I will add 3 to 5 oz pyramid or torpedo weights. You will find that braided line will cast farther than mono of the same test. Another advantage of braid is that it is much thinner than mono and will tend to be less effected by wave or current. Casting a heavy load with braid will normally cut your casting finger. To prevent this you can either tape your casting finger or use a shock leader. If you don't use a shock leader, make sure that your drag is tightened all the way down You do not want the drag to slip while casting, it will cut you to the bone. The inexpensive clip swivels will open under a load. Try using a Tactical Angler clip instead. They will not open. I have lost a lot of snares due to the bail closing during the cast and I have gone to a bailless reel (Penn SSV6500BLS) and never lost another snare. These reels have a great drag and are built like tanks. As far as bait, I do very well with squid and either anchovy or mackerel. For something that looks simple, it gets very involved. Hope this helps.

bob13bob
03-08-2014, 02:01 PM
Forgot about rubberbanding the bail which is very important. Mine came down during a cast slamming my rod in the side of the pier. Kept the snare , snapped the rod =(.

Fish_R_Us
03-22-2014, 12:08 PM
I agree with all the tips that the fellow sniffers advise. I use 2 large swivel snaps connected to the side of the snare, instead of the top. Crimp the swivels and solder them shut so they will never open up. Use a panduit tie to secure the bait door. Get rid of the rubber band/hook. Also some snares have 7 loops, the CA regulations state 6 loops allowed. Good Luck.