PDA

View Full Version : Trolling for trout



Alan_E
07-18-2007, 07:41 PM
Without a downrigger...what setup can one use? I think this subject was on here before...but without lead core? I went years ago with some older guys....@ 30 years ago...we went to Ice House/ Union Valley...We didn't use Lead core/Down riggers... just some kind of flashers and a worm trailing.... didn't have a real stiff rod.... But we caught fish.... As I understand it, you must get down to where the fish are....deeper during the summer...There must be a way to do this without all the weight on the line....any help here would be appreciated!!!

conrad89
07-18-2007, 08:13 PM
I am not an expert by any means, but some fishing stores do sell trolling weights. They come on a long swivel. Look it up on Cabela's to get a visual Or you can use a troll ease(its the big red thing on the front of a big lake troll), you can buy them individually. The troll ease has a hole on the bottum. Tie a peice of line on and(small piece) and attach a bass casting sinker. The draw back to this method is that there is no depth certainty. It all depends on how fast the boat is moving, how much line out etc. Good luck

SuperDave
07-19-2007, 09:55 AM
There are numerous inventions that get the line down deep. However, with the exception of a downrigger or an inline weight release, they all add considerable drag to the fishing experience. It more or less reduces you from a sport fisherman to a meat fisherman.

metalmouth
07-19-2007, 12:32 PM
As Dave said there are many ways to get deeper but short of dropping lead, each will detract from the fish fighting experience. The most common are lead core line, copper braided line, trolling weights, and divers. The diver thing looks like the most fun. ;D

TahoeJeff
07-19-2007, 12:54 PM
Mark Wiza has an excellent technique of using rubber core lead weights of various sizes to get down deep. It takes experimentation with speed, set back, line used, lures/flashers used, etc. to get to the desired depth. It does not add significant drag, and one can still feel the fish fight!

waterdog
07-19-2007, 01:55 PM
Lake trolling for trout/salmon using other methods besides a downrigger presents 2 main problems. First the other methods add considerable drag, so much so in some cases that you have to use heavier equipment/tackle and you are fighting the tackle in addition to the fish. Sometimes when you have a smaller fish on its difficult to tell if you have one on or not.
The second problem is accurate depth. Determining the depth your lure is at with diver (dipsy divers, pink ladys etc) or trolling weights is a guess at best. Even lead core line which is easier to guage depth is not that accurate, in that if you are 10' above or below the targeted fish you probably aint going to catch fish. When using a ff to locate fish, lure depth is critical. Trout/salmon look up(they cant look down with only their eyes) so if you have your lure below them they wont see the lure and thus no hookups.
With downriggers you can put your lure within a foot or 2 of a specific targeted depth.
Waterdog :)

PickLeNose
07-19-2007, 04:52 PM
With downriggers you can put your lure within a foot or 2 of a specific targeted depth.
Waterdog :)


And them we still get skunked, lol

The_Big_Sinus
07-20-2007, 09:50 AM
The second problem is accurate depth. Determining the depth your lure is at with diver (dipsy divers, pink ladys etc) or trolling weights is a guess at best. Even lead core line which is easier to guage depth is not that accurate, in that if you are 10' above or below the targeted fish you probably aint going to catch fish.

I would say that with practice, you can get pretty darn close... Requires fishing using the same boat, motor and gear, but with a fishfinder, it's not like you can't find bottom, troll over it and note whether or not you're making contact at a given depth.

The book Precision Trolling gives some pretty good pointers and charts that an immense aid to both non-downrigger trollers, and people who let a lot of line out behind the 'rigger ball...

My preference is Pink ladies for getting down, btw... However, my best fish seem to consistently come right on top, early or in bad weather.

LKTROR
07-20-2007, 12:10 PM
Dipsey divers work and remember trout are not always deep. *;) *:P *;D

SuperDave
07-20-2007, 12:24 PM
This looks to be a pretty clean diver that was going to be my answer to Pyramid restricting the use of downriggers.

http://www.luhrjensen.com/product_images/full/5540.jpg

http://www.luhrjensen.com/prod_lure_select.cfm?Stock=5540&ProductNo=5540-010-0086

The_Big_Sinus
07-20-2007, 02:36 PM
Various sizes of Jet Divers are also covered in Precision Trolling... ;)

YCDave
07-21-2007, 10:46 PM
I have been kicking this around a little but haven't tried it. I don't really want to spend the coin on down riggers, especially since I only lake fish once in awhile.

Could you improvise a downrigger with a lenth of parachute cord (or other rope) tied to the boat with a heavy weight and a release clip? You could mark the cord at known intervals so you know how deep it is.

If that would work it definitely would keep things cheap and simple. Any thoughts? I guess you could call it a redneck down rigger.

SierraSkier
07-21-2007, 11:14 PM
A small manual downrigger only costs about $70, and less on Ebay. I do like the redneck version though. That could work. Definitely not on Tahoe, but where you are only looking for 30 feet, why not? You wouldnt get wire hum either.

jeffrm20
07-22-2007, 09:56 AM
I think some of the divers after a certain amount of pull at one end i.e. a fish, it will snap out of the holder so the diver is inline with the line instead of the diving angle so it doesnt have any drag when you are fighting the fish. That propably made no sense. :o

Jeff

It looks like just the dipsy divers have them, this is just what it looks klike to me. One front side of the diver, some type of releasing mechanism?

http://cabelas.com/cabelas/en/content/Pod/01/17/28/p011728sq04.jpg