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Anti_Hero_Fisher
02-08-2007, 06:36 PM
I have heard of you fellow sniffers using a bobber + a fly on a spinning reel... Is that the same as a fly rod?

Can you just have the bobber and fly just sit out there without touching it and set it down or is it a flow of having to reel in slowly?

I have caught my fair share of fish on a flyfishing pole more than a spinning set up...

So yeah for trout well a bobber+fly= a good use of using or should i just use a fly rod?

Thanks

Fish On

AHF

Mr._Evinrude
02-08-2007, 06:49 PM
Sometimes you might try fly fishing but the place has no room for your casting. Or some people like me just can't use a fly rod...

sollimes
02-08-2007, 07:02 PM
You can use a fly rod on weekday with less people,but on the weekend
spining set up is way to go.
More casting distance and accuratcy,just cast it out and retrieve slowly.

red_perception
02-08-2007, 08:03 PM
Hello from Lake Tahoe, 2-Rods! Cast out the bobber, then fish your second rod (which ever you choose). Stay close to the rod with the bobber though. ;) Good luck,Eric :)

dansan
02-08-2007, 10:17 PM
A flyrod is a little more exciting, but you can't beat the range of an ultralight with a clear plastic bobber, partly filled with water. Fly should be about 3.5 to 4 feet below bobber. You can adjust depth by how full the bobber is and count it down. Then retrieve slow and steady, with twitches. Can be very fun.

Mad_Russian
02-08-2007, 10:57 PM
A flyrod is a little more exciting, but you can't beat the range of an ultralight with a clear plastic bobber, partly filled with water.
I dont know about that, I guess it all depends on how far you're casting it out. Fly rod can deliver a fly 60-90 feet out easily ( my casting and I'm not a pro at it ). But, as it was said before: different strokes for different folks.

dansan
02-09-2007, 06:33 AM
Quite true Mad Russian - but it is risky to do that with crowds on the shore or with others on the boat. I guess I didn't really say that. Thanks.

GCinGV
02-09-2007, 08:45 AM
I like to have both a fly rod and spinning rod with plastic bubbles in my Trout arsenal and use what ever seems to fit the bill at the time. With a long ultra-light rod a short piece of floating fly line tied on will also work as weight for shorter distances and you donít get the splash of the bubble. You can also throw weighted Nymphs with a spinning rod with no bubble.
I like to use a spinning rod for flies when in extremely tight areas like undercuts in small streams with lots of overhanging willows as well as for distance as in lakes from shore. Also helps if like me youíre not an expert with a fly rod.
GC

Mr_Ed
02-09-2007, 11:03 AM
= flyrod? ....................................... NO

Just a poor man's way to get a fly into the water.

25 feet with a red/white bobber, maybe 50 feet with the water filled.

You can catch fish this way, however a fly rod will out fish it.


As for weekend crouds.............

I never saw any "smart" person anywhere near a guy with a fly rod
due to the back cast and side arm action.

All I have to do is ask, "do you really want to stand there"? *

With a BIG grin on my face............. ;) * * ;D


Later *Ed

Anti_Hero_Fisher
02-09-2007, 12:34 PM
;D I agree Mr_Ed ;D

but it might be raining and wind could be a factor with my flyrod unless i am with the wind

So i have to think about it :D

Ill tell you how I do tomorrow

AHF

macfish
02-09-2007, 05:14 PM
You bobber heads, I've used this set up all my life in the Rockies and here in California. I use 7 to 8ft between bobber and fly and drag it slowly back, If you are in a high country lake you likely don't have the room behind you for a fly line. I've found that sometimes the plunk of the bobber attracts attention when the trout are surfacing. Plus if you are experienced at fly fishing there is nothing worse then getting skunked because your not landing your fly where there jumping, or its windy.
I also will use a helgramite or worm this way.
Useing a split shot below the bobber allow you to get alot of distance when bait fishing, cast it out and let the split shot sink before setting the reel *the fish won't feel a heavy weight.

troutfan
02-09-2007, 06:19 PM
= flyrod? ....................................... NO

Just a poor man's way to get a fly into the water.

25 feet with a red/white bobber, maybe 50 feet with the water filled.

You can catch fish this way, however a fly rod will out fish it.


As for weekend crouds.............

I never saw any "smart" person anywhere near a guy with a fly rod
due to the back cast and side arm action.

All I have to do is ask, "do you really want to stand there"? *

With a *BIG grin on my face............. ;) * * ;D


Later *Ed
I've used a plastic bubble/fly combo in the back country lakes of the Eastern Sierras for forty years and I can easily cast that setup much farther than any conventional fly rod with a floating line and there is no back cast to worry about in heavily wooded areas. ;)

Mad_Russian
02-09-2007, 06:23 PM
= flyrod? ....................................... NO

Just a poor man's way to get a fly into the water.

25 feet with a red/white bobber, maybe 50 feet with the water filled.

You can catch fish this way, however a fly rod will out fish it.


As for weekend crouds.............

I never saw any "smart" person anywhere near a guy with a fly rod
due to the back cast and side arm action.

All I have to do is ask, "do you really want to stand there"? *

With a *BIG grin on my face............. ;) * * ;D


Later *Ed
I've used a plastic bubble/fly combo in the back country lakes of the Eastern Sierras for forty years and I can easily cast that setup much farther than any conventional fly rod with a floating line. ;)

We'll have to see about that one, Tony ;D.....I'll be bringing my flyrod to Topaz soon ;)

troutfan
02-09-2007, 06:33 PM
I don't use that technique at Topaz but I could be convinced to try it if a friendly little wager was at stake.J/K *Keep in mind that the plastic bubble will weigh up to a couple of ounces on 4-6 lb test. *How far could you cast a 1-2 ounce weight on that little ultralight of yours? ;) ;D *It's not even close. *What do you have 35 yards of flyline and backing?

macfish
02-09-2007, 06:36 PM
I forgot to mention one draw back, if the line gets caught in your cast your bubble and fly will launch a couple hundered yards with a crisp crack, you may get lucky if you see it land and get it back.

troutfan
02-09-2007, 06:37 PM
I forgot to mention one draw back, if the line gets caught in your cast your bubble and fly will launch a couple hundered yards with a crisp crack, you may get lucky if you see it land and get it back.
Been there, done that! ;D

dansan
02-09-2007, 06:47 PM
I flyfish a fair amount and spin fish too and have to agree with Troutfan - a water filled clear bobber and decent ultralight combo wins in the distance category (assuming you are not equipped with an old plastic Zebco!). Who catches the most fish is the most interesting competition.

And yes, Mr_Ed, most of us would stay away, but I've seen some people on the shores of these crowded lakes who aren't too in-tell-a-junt! Maybe they've been wacked a bunch of times! Thanks for all the good comments!

troutfan
02-09-2007, 06:53 PM
The casting debate aside. *Using a light spinning outfit with a plastic bubble and 2 lb. test leader with size #18-22 small dry*fly is a very effective method to catch those wily little trout in the back country lakes. My favorite is the California Mosquito size #18-22, depending on the hatch. * You just wing it out and then retrieve slowly so the bubble causes a minimal wake, with a little twitch now and then. *The tricky part is the hook set. *If the bubble does anything funny you should just raise the rod and reel hard. *You will usually see the fish rise behind your bubble. *If you set the hook you will rip the fly out every time. *You will also need some dry fly dressing to keep the dry floating. *You should blow the excess water off every cast. *There is nothing more beautiful than a trout rising to a properly presented dry fly on a traditional fly rod cast by someone who is good at it(Not me). *The spinning rod/ plastic bubble method is nowhere near as artistic as the traditional fly rod method but it is a very effective alternative when you only have one pack rod.

macfish
02-09-2007, 07:02 PM
That would be after removing it from the tree behind you because you ducked as the bubble passed you after the got-one

troutfan
02-09-2007, 07:14 PM
That would be after removing it from the tree behind you because you ducked as the bubble passed you after the got-one
If you set the hook that hard, or at all, for that matter using the bubble method you won't be having trout for dinner. ;) ;D

piscolabis
02-09-2007, 10:19 PM
Here's my 2 cents.
I like the above ideas and they got me spinning off onto these thoughts:
I like using a fly rod for the challenge and the total feel (casting and catching).
High country lakes to me means above timberline (lots of room for backcasts with a flyrod).
The bubble set-up often leaves some slack in the line and often the fish is missed in the micro seconds of getting in the slack to set the hook of a somewhat tentative strike.
I like a leader of near the length of my spinning rod to keep the bobber further away from the distracting a fish approaching the fly, and yet allows me to net a larger fish (although at times I will use a short leader that allows to leave the bobble dangling 2 feet or so from the tip and therefore creating a bigger arc to swing the bobber and get greater distance on the cast).
I don't like the water disturbance in calm waters when the retrieved bobber leaves a wake. In choppy water a bobber is fine.
A flyrod cast with trees behind can be overcome by 1.) using an "L" cast where the backcast is directed upward and the forward cast is layed out horizontally or 2.) getting out some line an using a roll cast over the water (this helps in wind, too).
All this said, it all depends on how I feel. Sometimes I'll go with bobber and fly and other times I'll use the fly rod.
And finally, my favorite flies are: #16 or #14 female Adams, #14 or #12 Yellow Humpy, #18 or #20 Griffiths Gnat, (all fished dry) or #8 Black (or Black Sparkle) Wooly Bugger. In the back country practically anything works, however something with red works better on the east slope of the Sierra Nevada (Sierra Bright Dot), and Golden Trout love red.
Tom

Mr_Ed
02-09-2007, 10:38 PM
A fine wire , elk or deer hair humphy or Caddis will float or ever !!

Don't over look a olive scud, shrimp or a black nose dace with a
small split shot !!

A #18 black Gnat is my killer...........

hunkfisher
02-09-2007, 11:59 PM
Wooly Buggers Wooly Buggers And Woolybuggers work on most all trout around here really good on the stockers they put in the local lakes if your going to fly fish you need some space but its worth it when you catch em but the bobber tech on spin gear works well too just put about a 5 foot leader be hind it and adjust the wieght in the water filled bobber has you go i have found on windy days from shore its hard to cast with a fly rod so i go to my backup in the bobber and spin set up just a thought depends on when you go and the conditions of the day. Good Luck AHF

Brad "Hunkfisher"

[smiley=swimmingfish.gif]

Barbless_Fishin
02-10-2007, 09:14 AM
I've used the bobber and fly method before, it does work. Sometimes I can't bring my fly pole and spinning pole, so using the plastic bubble + fly with my spinning setup is my only choice. Speaking of wooley buggers, I used one behind flashers and caught a trout at chabot, interesting experiment that paid off.

FishMischief
02-10-2007, 10:59 PM
I used to do the fly and bubble thing in the June Lake Loop. Very popular technique there.

GCinGV
02-10-2007, 11:16 PM
Another way to cast flies with a spinning reel is using sugar cubes. Loop a small rubber band, the kind they use for braces, about 4 feet up the line. When you cast the cube melts leaving only the rubber band and fly. Things get pretty sticky when your cubes get wet though.
GC

gizmo
02-10-2007, 11:17 PM
hahahaha,
this is funny. when i was a kid my grandfather only fished with a tear drop bubble and a fly. we fished the basin lakes all summer using this method for years with huge success. every now and then my grandfather would use a cast master or something. but the funny part is, as a kid i thought everyone fished with a bubble and a fly. i didn't know of other ways to fish until i got older.
i havent fished with a bubble and fly in 10 years. i don't know why......
gizmo

FreshwaterFrank
02-11-2007, 04:23 AM
I agree with Troutfan, and have also been a bubble fly fisherman for a long time. Very seldom can any traditional rig outfish my spinning setup on a lake, and that's why I've always used it. Especially when hiking into the back country, the less gear you pack the better. Exception would be when there's a flat calm, but how often does that happen in the high country? Always use an inline bubble that you can fill with water. I paint mine so it shows up better when riding low in the water. I've had guys with flyrods quit in disgust watching me nail 'em one after another, while they're fiddling with their gear trying to get out to where I'm snagging them. It's almost unfair, but only almost.