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Eastbaytrouter
01-15-2007, 04:57 PM
Ok I've read about bobber fishing for trout. *What is the exact tactic?

1) Do you just clip a bobber 4-6 feet above your bait and cast it out? *With such a long leader, it would seem mightly hard for it to cast out very far. *
2) Do you use a slip bobber? *With my ultralight gear, the bobberstop can't pass through the guides, so again I have casting issues.
3) Do you float the bait up top (ie a chunk of powerbait), or let it hang 4-6 feet down (a worm)?
4) What types of depth are good for trying bobber fishing? *Shallows, gentle slopes, *deep drop offs? Doesn't matter?
5) Does wind or calm make a difference to the bite (other than crossing up everyone else)?
6) Any signs that we should bust out a bobber? *Jumping fish? *Ripples? *Doesn't matter?
The only luck I've had is by using a filled water bubble and powerbait. *I've had great sucess in certain conditions.

Any input would help...thanks in advance

BrownMeat
01-15-2007, 05:01 PM
i've seen people put the bobber between the top eye's on their pole, this serves as a strike indicator....

i have no idea how to do it either, i would probably set it up with a worm on a leader


i did use a bobber when i played tag with the bluegill ;D those fish fight! ;D

fishinator
01-15-2007, 07:13 PM
I like using a bober if the trout are feeding on top and I am not trolling. When using the bobber, I will usually leave about 2-4ft leader using a bait that sinks ( nightcrawler, roe, jig, fly) you can let it sit out and wait for it to go down or experiment with a slow retrieve. I've caught fish on both. If you donm't get enough casting distance, you can put a small clip weight below the bobber. Hope that helps a little.
fishinator

Trout_Terminator
01-15-2007, 08:17 PM
Ok I've read about bobber fishing for trout. *What is the exact tactic?

1) Do you just clip a bobber 4-6 feet above your bait and cast it out? *With such a long leader, it would seem mightly hard for it to cast out very far. *
2) Do you use a slip bobber? *With my ultralight gear, the bobberstop can't pass through the guides, so again I have casting issues.
3) Do you float the bait up top (ie a chunk of powerbait), or let it hang 4-6 feet down (a worm)?
4) What types of depth are good for trying bobber fishing? *Shallows, gentle slopes, *deep drop offs? Doesn't matter?
5) Does wind or calm make a difference to the bite (other than crossing up everyone else)?
6) Any signs that we should bust out a bobber? *Jumping fish? *Ripples? *Doesn't matter?
The only luck I've had is by using a filled water bubble and powerbait. *I've had great sucess in certain conditions.

Any input would help...thanks in advance


Ok, here it goes...

First off i find that you use a bobber when it is eather really early, or really late in the day, reason why, becouse the trout are feeding on top.

1) It depends on the depth that the fish are holding at, and what type of bait you are using, and quite the contrary to having it be hard to cast with such a long leader. If you have ever drift fished for salmon, it is kind of like that. Hold you rod to your prefered side (make sure nothing is in the way, or you hook/ line is caught on, becouse you will snap the tip of your rod no doubt), And then "lob it" to your prefered destination. Casting it can eather make it go really far, or it can snap your line, when you lob it, it can go the same distance, but the drab back it, it makes a rather large splash that can scare away fish. It is good though becouse your line doesent get caught on your bobber unlike a cast. Also, distance doesent matter always, i have caught fish 20' from shore using a bobber at ice house.

2) Yes, i prefer a slip bobber, but, it can be really hard to see it early in the morining so, what i do is use glow sticks *8-) (https://ssl10.securedata.net/gapen/floats3.html Scroll down untill you see "Glowsticks"). It is an advantage in alot of ways. Such as it attracts bait fish cause of the light, whick in turn attracts big fish, which will see your bait, and then you have a fish. And plus, when it is dark out side, a neon light in the water is very easy to see, and if i starts to fade, set the hook, cause you have a fish on. And when you comes to having a bobber stop, get the smallest size swivel you can find, and place it at the base of the bobber (closest to the bait), for the top, get a bead (yet again, the smallest you can finds, but still big enough to stop the bobber from sliding upwards), and slide it on, and super glue it onto your line *;) (read the super glue bottle, becouse some glues will actually eat through your line which in turn weakens it). In turn, you wont have the bobber sliping, and you will have a swivel so that he doesent twist up your line *;). AS for the casting, refer to my example in #1

3) As for floating it on top, i do both. if they are jumping alot and are active on top, guess where you bait should be, right on top with them *8-). To float a crawler, pump him full of air, and use the same setup with the invisable bober. With powerbait, read the jar, most every powerbait floats know, but some dont. so be careful. And when it comes to powerbait, get the smallest size hook you can (16 or 18 pending on the situation, sometimes it calles for bigger though), cause the hook can sink the bait. So cover the bait fully, but have the hook tips sticking out (so that when they swallow it, you can have a good hook-set, and when i meen sticking out, i dont meen fully exposed, i meen so that you dont have to push down alot to feel that they are there). As for having it sink, with power bait, have a bigger hook so that it wieghts, the powerbait down. AS for a worm, dont put air in it so that it sinks.

4) Depths depend on how far down the fish are, adjust the depths to what you think is right. i start off with about 4-6', cause in my experience, fish usually pratrol looking for food around these depths. When it comes to terrain it varies. Shallows, stick with the 4-6', gentle slopes (lets say it drops about 4', every 3'),it depends on how far out you cast out. lets say you are out 20', put it at about 6' becouse it is 26' deep, *deep drop offs, it you know it is really really deep, you can put it always down to 12' (or more). And it does and doesent matter. Sometimes the fish are just hungry and depth doesent matter, sometimes they are really picky and wont go after it unless it is an inch in front of there face.

5) Ah, wind, it does make a difference. i have had some of my best days bobber fishing on windy days (and some of my most frusterating), reason why, it acts as a trolling agent for you. it drags your bait, and moves it around, which entices the fish to strike at it. it also is a pain becouse it is harder to cast, and it makes it mroe dificult to detect suttle bites. And sometimes, the fish are really skiddish and the movement scares them away. it really does depend on the fish my friend, its what type of mood they are in.

6) When to bust out the bobber, when fish are feeding on top (you can tell, becouse you can see the fish jump, and the water boil), When they are jumping (becouse they are comming to the top, and on the way up, the have got to see your bait), but when they are jumping they might not be bighting to. some of the most frusterating times when that happens, its like they are taunting you really... And as you stated, you can fill the bobber with water so that it sinks to a desired depth to where the fish are holding at. this is an extremly effective way to cacth fish (you just have to find where they are at). For example, i have found that you can put on a power grub (power mouse, worm, anything), and let it sink the depth, then "work" it back. It, its basically trolling from shore, and it works really well to. *

And remeber, EXPERIMENT, this is the way people find out new ways to catch fish, and when you do this, you start to notice patterns that seem to work, and dont. also how the fish act on certian bodies of water. I hope i didint bore you to much with my answer to your questinos, and forgive me for my terrible grammar i am extremely tired. Good luck, and if you need anything else, dont be afraid to ask, this board has so much knowledge on it, you wouldent belive me if i told you *;).

Tight Lines, and FISH ON!
-Trout Terminator

AllFishNoWork
01-15-2007, 08:41 PM
The slip bobber and bobber stops can be quite a pain, but when I do use a bobber I really prefer to use them.

when it comes to powerbait, get the smallest size hook you can (16 or 18
TT-I must say I totally agree with you in that statement.
As a general rule, I don't use a bobber with PB tho and pretty much since I got a boat not so much PB at all.

Mr_Ed
01-15-2007, 08:43 PM
The chepo red/white bobbers are good for shore fishing or river if
the depth is under 8-10 feet. c/o 7 ft rods.

If deeper, you need to go to a slip bobber set up.

Most bobbers will hold a 3/8 oz weight w/o sinking.

Bait: a 1/4 : dia salmon egg or a 1/4" x 5" wiggly night crawler ?

Let me think now, this is a tuffy ?

Good fishing Ed

dapainter
01-15-2007, 08:56 PM
"DAMN" Big ups to the T-Terminator for his efforts in to answering each question.Thanks. FOR THE INFO ;D [smiley=mind-blowing.gif]

Trout_Terminator
01-15-2007, 08:58 PM
"DAMN" Big ups to the T-Terminator for his efforts in to answering each question.Thanks. FOR THE INFO *;D [smiley=mind-blowing.gif]


Thank you, and anytime bro, just give me a holler ;)

Ray@q97
01-16-2007, 02:06 PM
Hey TT thank you for the reply, I have wondered about bobber fishing as well. Use to do it as a kid all the time, but often thought I should try it sometime from the boat.......appreciate your suggestions for success.

Ray

tcbritton
01-16-2007, 06:13 PM
never forget to try a bobber for german browns. I use then to keep my worm near the top or just off the bottom along the dams where the german browns like to hang out and hunt minnows. ;) but there are some that think there are no browns in any lakes in eldorado county ;) :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D

Eastbaytrouter
01-17-2007, 12:16 PM
Many thaks to TT for the very comprehesive answers to my questions. I'll be trying out these tactics this season at my loacl lakes!!!

Eastbaytrouter

Jwood
01-17-2007, 02:47 PM
We used a type of slip bobber years ago in a lake in Washington State. The bobber had a hole in it and a bead with a hole in it. The bead would sit down in the hole. Line ran thru both bobber and bead. What we would do was figure how deep to fish and tie a small piece of rubber band on the line at the desired depth. Bait would sink to that depth. That way you would not have much line out when casting. When a fish hit you could hear the bead set into the opening in the bobber. Caught many nice cutts that way with a worm or shiner for bait.

keysersoze
01-17-2007, 04:02 PM
---( bobber ) -------------(split shot) (swivel) -----------leader line---hook


Well that's my setup. I usually do this depending on the moon. If its a full moon, I fish it late at night. If its no moon, I do this in the morning.

Reason being fish tend to eat at night when the moon lights up everything in the dark, so the majority of fish tend to be full.

Fish_Bully
01-18-2007, 07:33 AM
Great response TT! :) I'll add a little to the wind situation. Generally speaking, trout hang on the windblown side of all points and coves. This is important to know. Because you can catch fish on this side and if you were fishing the wrong side you probably will not. The problem this introduces is you are stuck with casting directly into the wind and the bobber doesn't stay out long (constantly keeps getting blown back to you and you constantly have to keep the slack up). However frustrating it may be, don't be tempted to fish the wrong side of points/coves. If fishing from a boat, anchor off and cast toward shore. Cast away from the wind when fishing from a boat and into the wind when fishing from shore.

I also use a bobber when fishing PB, but only as a strike indicator.

Hopefully this helps.

Flip

Budman
01-18-2007, 10:21 AM
I'll echo Jwoods' tip about the rubber band knot--it is cheap and small enough to flow through the eyes of the rod. To change the depth, wet your thumb and forefinger to slide the knot...

derrickrosare
01-18-2007, 10:47 AM
Maybe this should be added to the trout FAQ????

LordRooster
01-18-2007, 08:00 PM
I bobber fish all the time, most of what I do. put a couple waits between the bait and the bobber to get casting distance and a 2-4 ft leader and you're set. You don't get the hits that you do with a lure and often have to let the fish play with the bait a little before they will take it but it's a good way to fish.

It's a great way to teach little ones how to fish. I take my 5 and 6 year old fishing all the time. They are too little to cast and understand how to work a lure so you throw a baited bobber rig out there and watch how excited they get when the bobber starts to go down.

it's also great for those trips you take when you just want to sit in the quite, drink a beer and BS with the guys.

NRJohn
01-18-2007, 08:06 PM
Bobbers are great. A lot of times I'll be the only boat around using one. I've only used them at Crowley and Brigdeport because they are pretty shallow. Local lakes I very rarely bait fish and just troll.

When I use a bobber I usually just put half a crawler on. Have never tried p.b. Leader length is determined by depth. Typcially though we fish shallow (less than 20' often less than 10") and very flat so will have a pretty long leader. Min. 4' and often times 6'. Makes it hard to cast but don't have a problem. I just stand on the motor box and sort of lob it out. If there is a breeze I just put it on the side the wind is blowing and it'll push it away from the boat. Actually like a breeze since it'll move the bait around.

I don't think the bobber has ever outfished a regular inflated crawler. I think the only reason I do it is because I just like to see the bobber get pulled below the surface. To me it's a kick.

One other thing I'll do at times is just use an inflated crawler with no weight. I think that's just as effective as the bobber.

profzim
01-20-2007, 08:59 AM
really effective for me when fishing for trout in lakes, since I have a two rod stamp. One rod for going low with a sliding sinker rig, and the second with a bobber set up. A lot of these planted fish tend to come up and cruise shallow areas of the lake (sometimes you see them swimming by) and it just makes sense to fish at the depth the fish are at. As for bait, I swear by going combo with a piece of nightcrawler and a chunk of PB.

Barbless_Fishin
01-20-2007, 10:11 AM
Here are my bobber secrets:

If I'm using a floating bait, like power bait, I'll put a mini split shot just below the eyelet on a single hook. *The power bait will cover up the weight and it will keep the bait below the water. *When using a treble (not that often anymore unless I'm keepin' the trout), I crimp a small split shot on one of the hooks, making it a "double" not a "treble". *This can make hookups a little harder but it's effective.

I prefer using a clear plastic bubble, harder to see but trout don't seem to get spooked by them, they even hit the bubble! *Line set up looks like this:
<line>--------(bubble)---{swivel}-----<leader>-----------&hook&
I thread the line through the middle of the bubble so the bait depth can vary, this also means that you don't have to crimp the line. *This makes casting a little easier, I can use 3-4 feet of leader, but get down to 8-10 feet below the surface because as the bait sinks, the line slips through the middle of the bubble. *Another cool thing is that there are only 3 knots, 1 on each side of the swivel and 1 on the hook. *Less knots=less potential areas of failure. *Plus there are no "kinks" in the line from attaching the bobber with a loop. *If you want more visibility on the bubble, you can paint one of the sides. *You need to leave some air in the bubble so it still floats. *Another cool thing about using this setup is if you want to go off of the bottom, just fill the bubble up with water, add a mini split shot (only if needed to make it sink faster), inflate your worm or floating bait and cast your line out...no changing your setup.

Lots of good advice on this thread!

FreshwaterFrank
01-20-2007, 10:14 AM
What a great thread for bobber ideas. I've used them forever, I think my first ever fish were caught on a bobber/worm rig in Upper Mosquito Lake...about 1956. Most people tend to stick with what has worked for them, and so I have always gone to bobbers when stuck W/O a clue how to fish some new water. Bobbers also work for fly-fishing, sometimes better than anything else including a traditional flyrig. I know places with cutts or goldens, where flies early or late are almost always the only way you can catch anything at all. A slip-bobber with 6' leader & a fly is the medicine. I fill the bobber until it barely floats, and then you can really chuck it out there. Paint it white or red on the top end & you can still see it.

troutfan
01-20-2007, 10:32 AM
I used to fish the back country lakes on the John Muir trail alot, still do once in awhile. *Long Lake is only two miles from South Lake on Bishop creek and we would kill them with a plastic bubble, 6-8' of 1-2 lb. test and #18-22 Calif. Mosquitos. *Nice Browns, Brookies, Rainbows 8-15 inches.

TP
01-20-2007, 11:19 AM
I use a clear bubble with water in it at times for extra wieght. It will help you cast further and keep it off the bottom

troutfan
01-21-2007, 07:18 AM
Anybody have any advice on fishing slip bobbers at Eagle Lake? Depths and tecnique and if you have any pictures of your set-up.

GCinGV
01-21-2007, 08:10 AM
If you can find them there is another type of slip-bobber stop that is a very small coil of wire that you slide over the line along with a small bead then you stretch out the coil to hold it in place. As long as the wire isnít bent it passes through the guides when casting allot better then the thread type stops. Most of the time you have to re-straighten the wire before casting again after reeling it in past the guide.
GC