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*Deltadog*
09-11-2006, 10:58 AM
Went camping at Caples over the weekend, fishing off the bank was very slow for all from what I saw unless you were quite the early riser. Got a total of six fish all weekend. There is a 2 hour window from about 4:30am-6:30am where you can do decent fishing off the bank. I was fishing in a little spot by the Immigrant Lake trailhead, the first cove back along the trail. Got two Saturday morning on the small side, but after how it went, made a plan of attack for the following morning. Yesterday morning caught three Rainbows, all about 16 inches and one Brook to about 11. I got out there around 4 am, still wicked dark but had the fullmoon. Took my lantern none the less, caught my first two fish by lantern light. Using Powerbait pastes, Lime-twist, Chartruese, and Spring Green varieties, and a #6 hook, they seem to be partial to the greens and yellows of the Powerbait type right when they wake up or something. It was a frantic bite like a switch was turned on, and when the sun came up, just as fast, nothing. So my advice is, for you guys banking it, be on site by 4:30 am, bring a lantern and fish the east bank of the lake. As soon as the sun comes up, its a done deal. *At least for now, no telling what the bite will be like next week. Oh yeah, I checked the regs, you can fish Caples at night for trout.
* *Dog

anglinfool
09-11-2006, 02:44 PM
I was up at Caples last month mid-August and we made out with 8 trout for two of us from about 7:30 am until 11:30 am. We used mainly spinners while one was caught on chartreuse power bait. We didn't get into the first fish until after 8 or so.

troutboy
09-11-2006, 02:54 PM
I was there 2 weeks ago on my boat with my Wife and my buddy D30. We fished 3 days and each caught about 10 per day. We were trolling mostly, but we also did really well bait fishing with crawlers.

One bit of important advice for that lake. Use water bobbers and not lead weights. The water bobbers give you the weight you need to cast far, but it sinks REALLY slowly which allows you to drift your bait down. After a while you'll notice when you get your hits (often in the middle of your sink). You can also slowly jig your crawler back to you and you'll get a lot of fish that way also. I found with lead you sink too fast and get snagged a lot (rocky bottom).

You can also use a floating bobber (which caught us a few fish), but it was not nearly as good as using a water bobber.

Trolling was also extremely productive with grubs, crawlers, and rapalas. Mostly surface to 10 feet pulling flashers and dodgers.

tortuga
09-11-2006, 03:14 PM
Man I can't wait for the fall! Caples should be red hot for browns and macs. We plan on a trip sometime late Oct or early Nov. (if I can tear myself away from Melones) Thanks for the good reports. Every little trick or bait I hear about helps me tilt the odds just a little more!
Tight lines
Tortuga [smiley=fishing1.gif]

*Deltadog*
09-11-2006, 03:21 PM
One bit of important advice for that lake. Use water bobbers and not lead weights. The water bobbers give you the weight you need to cast far, but it sinks REALLY slowly which allows you to drift your bait down. After a while you'll notice when you get your hits (often in the middle of your sink). You can also slowly jig your crawler back to you and you'll get a lot of fish that way also. I found with lead you sink too fast and get snagged a lot (rocky bottom).


I got quite a few bites way out there in the late afternoon, but had too much weight, I lost every fish. Good idea about the bobbers...
Dog

dirty3hirties
09-12-2006, 03:28 PM
Bankfishing doesn't seem to be nearly as productive. *Troutboy and I fished the Woods Creek area and saw numerous bankers. *But most were floating PB off the bottom. *If I were on the banks in that area, I would use worms on a water bobber for sure. *Not only is a worm more natural looking but you can cover a lot more area with a water bobber....covering different depths and surface area. Nothing in my book beats a worm, especially when the conditions are tough. *We caught fish all day but using worms and subtle presentations which makes me believe that the fish are always there but not as aggressive during the latter part of the day but they'll still bite if you show the right bait the right way. *

*Deltadog*
09-12-2006, 04:38 PM
I dont know if a worm would make them bite anymore than reeling in a crank or two with your PB after you cast, making a slow retrieve with it and letting it sink back to the bottom. I caught two this way. Heard and saw way more fish landed off the bank over the weekend off the bottom than with bobbers.
Dog

Flycanoe
09-12-2006, 06:41 PM
Bankfishing doesn't seem to be nearly as productive. *Troutboy and I fished the Woods Creek area and saw numerous bankers. *But most were floating PB off the bottom. *If I were on the banks in that area, I would use worms on a water bobber for sure. *Not only is a worm more natural looking but you can cover a lot more area with a water bobber....covering different depths and surface area. *Nothing in my book beats a worm, especially when the conditions are tough. *We caught fish all day but using worms and subtle presentations which makes me believe that the fish are always there but not as aggressive during the latter part of the day but they'll still bite if you show the right bait the right way. *


Thanks for the tip on the water bobber. I will give that a try next time I'm faced with tough fishing conditions. I tried a similar technique last weekend with some shot and a worm to get the slow sink, but the casting distance is poor. Still managed one trout though using that technique under tough fishing conditions. But covering more water both horizontally and vertically is a big advantage and a great idea. *

atavuss
09-12-2006, 07:29 PM
it was so windy Sunday I got tired of fighting with trying to keep the boat on course so we went way up to the end almost of Emigrant Bay. there were people camping back in there, they used a small aluminum boat to haul in their gear, took them 3 trips to get all their stuff out. looks like it would have been a cool place to camp with no one else around.

cool_hand_luke
09-13-2006, 10:30 AM
I hope this isn't a stupid question....what is a"waterboobber"I am thinking it may be a clear bubble that you fill with water,but I didn't know that it sank slow like that....

Flycanoe
09-13-2006, 04:43 PM
I hope this isn't a stupid question....what is a"waterboobber"I am thinking it may be a clear bubble that you fill with water,but I didn't know that it sank slow like that....


It's a clear plastic bubble with a plug in it to hold the water. When its empty, it floats, when its full, it sinks fast. *Using trial and error you can find the right mix of water/air to achieve almost neutral bouancy that results in a slow sink. *

Stinger15
09-14-2006, 06:12 AM
I was at Caples the 5th, 6th and 7th. It was a full moon and we still did well from the bank in the morning up till about eleven a.m. We used a water bobber, half full slid up on the line about 18 inches with one little split shot to keep it there. After casting, the line would slowly slide down through the bobber and eventually end up on the bottom of the lake. My partner caught a five pounder rainbow and I caught a nice mix of rainbows, browns and mackinaws. Use a half crawler, on a size six or eight hook, and I noticed the bite did pick up when I squirted some Pro cure anchovy oil on the worm. I can pretty much guarantee a limit if you use this method off the bank at the big rock just past the first dam heading up on 88.

cool_hand_luke
09-15-2006, 10:37 AM
does have to be one of those big Plastic clear bobbers,I have some of the smaller ones and could swear I have never noticed it sinking even when filled with water all the way.Sounds like a great method just trying to nail done how you guys do it...thanks

troutboy
09-15-2006, 01:14 PM
The size or color of the bobber doesn't matter too much. Larger size just means more weight and thus further casts. What you want to achieve is a enough water to sink nice and slow. I like it to sink about 1 foot roughly every 10-15 seconds. Once I get this timed the way I like, I know I'll be rouhgly 5 feet down every minute I let my bait soak. If it hits bottom with no strike I'll reel in slowly. Every now and then I may pause or speed up (jerky motions). I also like to use a 1/2 crawler which is inflated so it stays off the bottom. If you keep getting hits at a consistant time from when you bait hits the water, you'll have a pretty good idea what depth the fish are at as well. You can then time your retrieve such that you are bringing your worm back in around 10 feet (if fish are at 10 feet, no reason to let it sink down to 50 feet).

This method has really worked well for me at Caples, Del Valle, and Amador. Which is not to say it won't work in other places, just that I fish those locations more than others.

I personally thinks worms work better than powerbait when the water is very clear (like caples lake). The wormy live actions will bring the fish in. I will often add a power gulp egg to the worm if water is stained. My theory here is that as visibility drops trout will use more scent than vision to locate food. While worms probably smell yummy to them, power bait puts more scent into the water. I also use Anise to cover any human scent.

You can use powerbait alone on a water bobber set up (esp on newly planted trout) and just soak it on the bottom. This is good on rocky bottoms where lead will snag all day long. However, I've had a lot less sucess on getting bites on the retrieve with only power bait.

of course all this being said. feel free to expierment. There is no hard and fast rule. Fish can be anywhere and often you'll be surprised when you get fish on a cast you thought was "bad" or "in the wrong spot". Other times you'll do everything just right and catch nothing. The one thing I have learned is that if you are not catching fish, you need to change something. Change bait, change presentation, change location, but make sure you change. Sometimes the smallest of changes will get fish to bite.

One reason there are so many fishing lures and baits on the market is because people have bad days and start thinking about better ways to catch fish. I'm always surprised when I think of something to try and it works and say to myself "why hasn't someone else marketed something like this" only to find that someone has and I just never noticed before.

The_Big_Sinus
09-15-2006, 01:51 PM
My partner caught a five pounder rainbow and I caught a nice mix of rainbows, browns and mackinaws.

Sure those "macks" weren't brookies? Not that I think you don't know you're fish, but they do plant them in there...


The one thing I have learned is that if you are not catching fish, you need to change something. Change bait, change presentation, change location, but make sure you change. Sometimes the smallest of changes will get fish to bite.

But out of all those things, I've found that changing location works the best... Sometimes, you aren't where the fish are, and there is no amount of monkeying with the "presentation" that will fix it.

My favorite tactic is to pack two rods, either a spoon and bait, or a spoon and jig or spinner (depending on surface activity) and to walk the shore and fan cast, counting down to the fish. That way when I get a hit, I can work that area thoroughly with a slower presentation.

troutfan
09-15-2006, 03:08 PM
It should be good at Caples, they may get some snow tonight! 8-)

red_perception
09-16-2006, 04:58 PM
Caples has Mackinaw also. Eric :)

froggie
09-17-2006, 02:59 PM
::)As you can probably see from my lack of posts thatTortuga's been monopolizing the internet connection...gosh we need DSL. I am thrilled to hear the fishing is picking up at Caples. I really loved our visit there in Jule (even tho we did not catch anything!)
Looking forward to trying it again with , hopefully more luck as the weather cools off some. We'll continue sleuthing that lake til we get some fish.[smiley=sherlock.gif]
Froggie [smiley=swimmingfish.gif]