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mallardman
04-11-2011, 07:11 PM
I haven't been fishing in awhile but do know what I'm doing just haven't been up to date I have been trying to read what all the fellow fisherman put in here and have been doing my home work on where they are stocking, just curious I have tomorrow morning off of work now and want to really hook my my little 3 year old boy into some fish he keeps asking, now do you fisherman have any advice for me I would love some please. I know they stock Quarry lakes and Shadow cliffs this week I am just trying to find out when so my little man knows what that tugs like in his hands.Thank you for anything and good fishing.

SuckerPunch
04-11-2011, 07:33 PM
If you're after hatchery fish with bait, use a sliding-weight set-up of some kind (e.g., a sliding sinker, an Adjust-a-Bubble filled with water, etc) with a 2-lbs-test leader and a treble hook in either a size 18 or 20. Leader size depends on how deep you're fishing - I typically have a leader length of 5 feet. Mold just enough PowerBait onto the hook so it covers it - you should have a ball of bait that's about 3/8" to 1/2" in diameter. Use rainbow PowerBait, and, from that, preferentially take a certain color based on the water clarity: if the lake's pretty clear, use as much green as possible; if it's stained or turbid, use the yellow and orange. Chuck the rig out during the morning/evening either (1) near the location of the plant or (2) the first point/corner adjacent to the planting site. Leave some slack in the line after the bait settles - trout, even hatchery fish, don't want to feel any weight when they pick up a bait. As the sun rises in the sky, you'll have to fish progressively deeper unless the wind picks up.

As for hardware, big bright stuff, such as a 1/6-oz Super Duper in chrome, will work well during the morning when the light is low. As the sun gets higher, go smaller and darker - a 1/16-oz Panther Martin with a black body and gold-colored blade is a good bet. Fish these lures SLOW - you want to reel just fast enough to get 'em working. Don't use anything heavier than 4-lbs line; heavier line both decreases your casting distance and affects the action of the lure.

You can also use small tube jigs in 1/32 oz and 1/64 oz sizes under a float or by themselves. Personally, I like 'em under a float - chuck 'em out there and just twitch 'em back slowly. Like with PowerBait, go with greens in clear water and yellows/oranges in more stained water.

Hope this'll help you out.

mallardman
04-11-2011, 07:44 PM
That does help thank you very much, now just not sure where to go and if they stock tomorrow anywhere.

crazyfisher
04-11-2011, 09:04 PM
good info suckerpunch

RomanFishin
04-11-2011, 09:48 PM
good info suckerpunch

I read somewhere about how trout see colors and If I remember right they can see darker colors like spring green better in murkier water, not exactly sure if thats right... but I always had more success with darker colors in less water clarity. If someone knows any details please post the info thanks..

SuckerPunch
04-12-2011, 07:04 AM
I read somewhere about how trout see colors and If I remember right they can see darker colors like spring green better in murkier water, not exactly sure if thats right... but I always had more success with darker colors in less water clarity. If someone knows any details please post the info thanks..

If by "darker colors" you mean blue and green, no, those colors are generally not visible in murky waters since their wavelengths are filtered out. Longer-wavelength colors such as orange and red, however, do transmit longer distances in murky water than blues and greens. Yellow and chartruese are really versatile attractor colors since they're pretty visible in both murky and clear waters. In murky shallow water with a bright sun, black can be killer - murky water tends to reflect light in all directions while black doesn't reflect any light, which gives good contrast.

RomanFishin
04-12-2011, 07:23 AM
If by "darker colors" you mean blue and green, no, those colors are generally not visible in murky waters since their wavelengths are filtered out. Longer-wavelength colors such as orange and red, however, do transmit longer distances in murky water than blues and greens. Yellow and chartruese are really versatile attractor colors since they're pretty visible in both murky and clear waters. In murky shallow water with a bright sun, black can be killer - murky water tends to reflect light in all directions while black doesn't reflect any light, which gives good contrast.


Thanks for clearing that up

mallardman
04-12-2011, 09:16 PM
So I thank you guys for the info and as I didn't even make it out after all, my little brother and his friend went out to Quarrys with lines in at 0615 and two fish on the stringer with in 10 minutes that was all they got, not even another bite being out of there by 1130. One fish was about 14" and the other was a nice 4lber and beautiful pink meat, made great lunch.