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GNappers
07-05-2011, 09:09 PM
Tried to hit up the West Carson on the way up to Tahoe City from El Dorado Hills but it was blown out. Stopped at the bridge on the way to Caples and casted out a few lures with no bites. Got to Caples around 10 and fished near the spillway. Tried castmasters, panther martins flies and worms with water bobbers with no bites for the first 2 hours. On the other pole I put on chartruese Gulp bait and while I move closer to the spillway I looked back to see my indicator slowly rise. By the time I got to my pole and removed the bobber the line shot out and I picked it up and it was fish on. Fought the fish for about 5 minutes with plenty of good runs and getting hung up on the rock for a bit before I landed this surprise fish.
http://i844.photobucket.com/albums/ab4/GNappers/Fishing Stuff/IMG_0537.jpg

Never thought a Mac would bite Gulp and I wasn't sure about the size limit so I asked some people fishing there and they told me you had to release brown's and Mac so back in the water it went. A day later I went to the hardware store in Tahoe City, who are very helpful on what to use and where to go, and got a reg book and couldn't find anything of having to release any fish at Caples or there being a size limit. Oh well it was a great fight and the fish earned it's freedom. I was staying at my cousins house so yesterday I took my cousins kid to Bocca and we caught 1 rainbow on 3 white eggs dipped in Berkeley scent.
http://i844.photobucket.com/albums/ab4/GNappers/Fishing Stuff/IMG_0541.jpg

Caught 1 small trout on a panther martin 3 days ago in the inlet to Bocca but had plenty of bites in the half hour I fished there and 2 more at the Bocca dam on the same lure.

Captain Compassion
07-06-2011, 07:04 AM
Gulp seems to work well with Bows, LCT and Brookies. Never caught a Brown or Mack on the stuff. Your fish is kinda neat. There is no size or species limit on fish from Caples. There should be quite a few Macks in Caples of that size from the massive fingerling stock in 2009.

CC

FishItswuts4dinner
07-06-2011, 09:42 AM
Great catch. My uncle has also caught a mac from shore too using pb but was at pardee.

Captn ofthe Crest
07-06-2011, 09:56 AM
Lake Pardee? Are you sure it was a Mack?

Jfitalia
07-06-2011, 10:26 AM
Great catch. My uncle has also caught a mac from shore too using pb but was at pardee.


pardee doesnt have macks. however they do at times use calaveras hatchery and they hve stocked brookies in there before. i have seen many people mistake brookies for macks...... :cheeky-smiley-024:

FishItswuts4dinner
07-06-2011, 05:13 PM
My bad i just got mac stuck n the head. Tis koke that i meant. Lol

Stickman
07-06-2011, 06:07 PM
pardee doesnt have macks. however they do at times use calaveras hatchery and they hve stocked brookies in there before. i have seen many people mistake brookies for macks...... :cheeky-smiley-024:

The reason for the occasional ID confusion is that Brook Trout are not actually trout - they are in the Char family. Trout are in the Salmon family, having dark spots on a light background. Char (which include Mackinaw and Brook Trout) have light spots on a dark background. That is why brookies and macs (especially young ones) can be confused for one another. I know this from reading Ralph Cutter's book: Sierra Trout Guide, which I heartily reccomend to fellow "board" members.

Stickman

*Deltadog*
07-08-2011, 05:45 AM
The reason for the occasional ID confusion is that Brook Trout are not actually trout - they are in the Char family. Trout are in the Salmon family, having dark spots on a light background. Char (which include Mackinaw and Brook Trout) have light spots on a dark background. That is why brookies and macs (especially young ones) can be confused for one another. ....Stickman Dolly Varden/Bull Trout are as well..

Jfitalia
07-08-2011, 08:55 AM
The reason for the occasional ID confusion is that Brook Trout are not actually trout - they are in the Char family. Trout are in the Salmon family, having dark spots on a light background. Char (which include Mackinaw and Brook Trout) have light spots on a dark background. That is why brookies and macs (especially young ones) can be confused for one another. I know this from reading Ralph Cutter's book: Sierra Trout Guide, which I heartily reccomend to fellow "board" members.

Stickman


I dont think one being from the Char family and the other salmon family is the reason for the confusion.... Its more to do with the spots not what family they're from

FishItswuts4dinner
07-08-2011, 01:33 PM
Its was a koke caught from shore at pardee guys. My wife says to her friends "we went fishing at caples lake and we caught 5 stripers" :rofl:No matter how many time i correct her, "striper" seems to always come out

PapaGreg
07-08-2011, 04:54 PM
That is funny, my wife continues to tell people about "the hitchhiker halibut" that latched onto a small fish she was bringing up in Alaska, needless to say, it was a ling doing the hitchhiking!

Jetspray
07-09-2011, 05:57 AM
Its was a koke caught from shore at pardee guys. My wife says to her friends "we went fishing at caples lake and we caught 5 stripers" :rofl:No matter how many time i correct her, "striper" seems to always come out


You can catch those there but they will cost more money:mind-blowing::goodnight:........Jetspray

SuckerPunch
07-09-2011, 10:26 AM
The reason for the occasional ID confusion is that Brook Trout are not actually trout - they are in the Char family. Trout are in the Salmon family, having dark spots on a light background. Char (which include Mackinaw and Brook Trout) have light spots on a dark background. That is why brookies and macs (especially young ones) can be confused for one another. I know this from reading Ralph Cutter's book: Sierra Trout Guide, which I heartily reccomend to fellow "board" members.

Stickman

Just to clarify - char (e.g., brook trout, lakers, bull trout, Dollies, Arctics) are in the genus Salvelinus; all Pacific salmon, rainbows, cutthroat, and other west-of-the-Rockies trout (e.g., Gila trout) are in the genus Oncorhynchus; and brownies and Atlantics are in the genus Salmo. ALL of these species are in the "salmon family" - Salmonidae.

I also second Ralph Cutter's book - it's a great read. Another one is Lake Fishing with a Fly by Ron Cordes and Randall Kaufmann, which debunks a lot of trout-fishing myths out there.