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twoplanker
08-17-2011, 12:04 PM
I'm taking the kids to Sequoia and plan on fishing a little at Hume- bringing Kastmasters, PowerBait and night crawlers. I'd like to get my kids on the fish, any suggestions? Reply or PM me if you guys have any insight. Thanks

Plug-n-Jug
08-17-2011, 12:12 PM
I'm taking the kids to Sequoia and plan on fishing a little at Hume- bringing Kastmasters, PowerBait and night crawlers. I'd like to get my kids on the fish, any suggestions? Reply or PM me if you guys have any insight. Thanks

We always had luck with green sparkle PB - GREEN not CHARTRUSE! Best spot for us over the last few years was on the side that the Christian camp is on. There is a large rock out crop half way between where the road comes in and the camp. Try there about 3' off the bottom. Good luck and let us know how you do.

lookin4trout
08-17-2011, 01:40 PM
I basically learned how to fish in Sequoia. I got hooked as my dad took me to the small creeks and we caught numerous rainbows and brookies. Of course, the fish were pan size with an occasional nice one, but the action totally caught my attention and I'm still going nearly 50 years later. You do have to be careful as to know when you are in the Park or Forest as the rules and regs can be quite different. One area that I have had repeated success is on Stoney Creek. The last I knew is that they stock it in the campgrounds, but if you go upstream there is plenty or natives, especially where the creek splits. Worms will do the trick for the natives and eggs for the plants. I know this is a bit from Hume, but I would check out any and all streams. The added benefit is that by walking the creeks, you get away from the crowds, see a lot of beautiful nature, and spend quality alone time with the kids. Just be careful, don't get lost, and keep an eye out for bears. Enjoy!

Plug-n-Jug
08-17-2011, 02:25 PM
I basically learned how to fish in Sequoia. I got hooked as my dad took me to the small creeks and we caught numerous rainbows and brookies. Of course, the fish were pan size with an occasional nice one, but the action totally caught my attention and I'm still going nearly 50 years later. You do have to be careful as to know when you are in the Park or Forest as the rules and regs can be quite different. One area that I have had repeated success is on Stoney Creek. The last I knew is that they stock it in the campgrounds, but if you go upstream there is plenty or natives, especially where the creek splits. Worms will do the trick for the natives and eggs for the plants. I know this is a bit from Hume, but I would check out any and all streams. The added benefit is that by walking the creeks, you get away from the crowds, see a lot of beautiful nature, and spend quality alone time with the kids. Just be careful, don't get lost, and keep an eye out for bears. Enjoy!

+1. i forgot about the feeder creeks . They can be red hot at times. My best method in the creeks is to drift live crickets, the trout cant resist them.

twoplanker
08-17-2011, 09:31 PM
This is all good info. I'm hoping that this will be an unforgettable trip for the kids.

twoplanker
08-18-2011, 04:13 PM
+1. i forgot about the feeder creeks . They can be red hot at times. My best method in the creeks is to drift live crickets, the trout cant resist them.

So by drifting, you mean weightless, bubble float, bobber, splitshot, or what? The crickets that I have in my area are very small and would need some kind of weight to flip in a stream, I think. Feel free to chime in on effective stream drifting techniques. Thanks