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View Full Version : Wooly Buggers on an UL Rod - Am I Crazy?



TroutGhost
07-19-2012, 11:53 AM
I moved from Oakland to Massachusetts and am surrounded by trout streams, trout brooks, trout rivers... all over the place. From a book about local fishing I picked up, they hold wild trout year round. Wild brook, rainbow and brown trout. I figured I might throw some flies at them (just for fun) and bought some wooly buggers because they're pretty much the same as jigs. I know I can fling the spinners, worms, and plastic at them. But I want to give the flies a try but on an UL rod. Am I crazy?

My idea is to load up an UL rod with 2 pound test and fling the buggers at the trout. Some of the buggers are normal, some have bead heads and others have coneheads. Do you think that will work? Supposedly there is virtually no wrong way to fish a wooly bugger, but do you have any tips or recommendations on color, size or jigging techniques?

I also picked up some non-specific nymph/midge patterns to do the float and fly thing. Whaddaya think, am I losing my mind or does it sound viable?

FresnoJack
07-19-2012, 12:04 PM
Buggers are a good pattern just about everywhere.

You may want to check at a local fly shop for suggestions as to what patterns to use and where.


I moved from Oakland to Massachusetts and am surrounded by trout streams, trout brooks, trout rivers... all over the place. From a book about local fishing I picked up, they hold wild trout year round. Wild brook, rainbow and brown trout. I figured I might throw some flies at them (just for fun) and bought some wooly buggers because they're pretty much the same as jigs. I know I can fling the spinners, worms, and plastic at them. But I want to give the flies a try but on an UL rod. Am I crazy?

My idea is to load up an UL rod with 2 pound test and fling the buggers at the trout. Some of the buggers are normal, some have bead heads and others have coneheads. Do you think that will work? Supposedly there is virtually no wrong way to fish a wooly bugger, but do you have any tips or recommendations on color, size or jigging techniques?

I also picked up some non-specific nymph/midge patterns to do the float and fly thing. Whaddaya think, am I losing my mind or does it sound viable?

OYD
07-19-2012, 12:30 PM
Go for it. You may need to add some small split shot to cast with your ultralight. Start with small split shot one at a time positioned about 18 inches above the fly. Fly fishing the small brooks and streams is a lot of fun in the northeast and soon you will want a short light fly rod to better control your flies. Have fun!!

RideNfish
07-19-2012, 12:57 PM
Dude! Where have you been. That is one of my fave methods. For some reason I have been doing better on tube jigs lately but was doing best with woolies. Both lake and stream.

Sorry if this isn't what you want but here are some links from my reports. And Lone Angler is right, small splits and drift it just like a salmon egg. But unlike a salmon egg you will get hit a lot on the "swing" of the line after the natural drift. Then when it's straight downstream from me I will jig it slowly up and down to entice any last bites.

Read up :-)

http://www.fishsniffer.com/forums/trout-board/94398-melones-12-30-%5Bpics-trout%5D.html#post847003

(http://www.fishsniffer.com/forums/trout-board/94398-melones-12-30-%5Bpics-trout%5D.html#post847003)http://www.fishsniffer.com/forums/trout-board/94565-melones-jan-6-yes-%5Bpics-fish%5D.html

I couldn't find my wooly bugger stream thread but you get the idea.

Cheers,

Marv
07-19-2012, 12:58 PM
Woolys rock! Behind a bubble or with a split shot like loneangler suggested. You can drift a bugger just like a salmon egg. Fishing nymphs under a thill shy bite or mini stealth on spinning gear is a pretty popular. There is even some master fly fisher and he said " nymphing is way more effective on spinning gear" but he doesn't spin fish.

Just because someone has done it doesn't mean it wont work. Good job stepping out of the box.

Marinpaul
07-19-2012, 01:14 PM
As others have said, this definitely works. I always keep some basic brown and black wooly buggers in the tackle box, and drift/jig them just like single salmon eggs or tube jigs. Have fun experimenting!

TroutGhost
07-19-2012, 02:21 PM
Thanks for the feedback! As soon as I finish up with an important project I'm going to start hitting up the local waters. Will post pics! :)

Wolf74
07-19-2012, 07:18 PM
Sounds awesome dude. But like mentioned earlier, you might wanna slap a small splitshot or something to improve casting. I always fished them with a bubble, but if your fishing a stream it might not as well. Experiment, I'm sure you'll find the right combination, but I think your headed in the right direction.

HMONG_James_Vang
07-19-2012, 08:27 PM
woolly buggers on an ultra light rod... that's what we do at amador brother. =)

Plug-n-Jug
07-20-2012, 07:31 AM
Pick up a few Pistol Petes to. They are just like Woolybuggers but they have a small propeller in front of them. They work great in streams and add a little flash like a spinner would.

ryanerb
07-20-2012, 03:09 PM
common thing is to use a fly and bubble. they make sliding clear plastic bubbles that are used for flies on spinning rods. check on google.

also, if i have to fish deep (20+ft), i use a egg sinker and swivel, and 4ft leader with a bugger.

woolybuggin
07-20-2012, 04:26 PM
Can nevet go wrong with a woolybugger : )

TroutGhost
08-05-2012, 08:27 AM
Updating this thread to share my learning experience, first time sight fishing with buggers for pressured wild brookies on the East Coast.

Fished a mouth to a pond, where a creek enters via a culvert. Wild trout were in a foot or less of water, to no deeper than a couple feet, picking off insects, including a couple trout that jumped clear out of the water, I think picking off dragonflies. Low and clear water, sight fishing. There was one boss brookie by itself and a bunch of smaller ones here and there plus a group hiding under a sunken log. Spotted this bunch the evening before, scouting out the spot because I suspected it was a likely spot for trout. I was right. So I woke up early the next day to try my hand fishing them. Arrived at the hole about 8 AM.

Setup was an UL rod with two pound test. I've never sight fished for wild trout before, this was my first time, particularly in such low and clear conditions. I suspect these trout are probably pressured, living so close to the road next a culvert.

Tossed out a size 6 conehead woolly bugger, olive with black marabou tail. On an UL rod with 2# test it was easy to fling it twenty feet or so. Controlling the line was a bigger issue because if there's too much out when the lure lands the line starts floating around in whatever breeze is out there, lol. It's like fishing with a spider web.

So I tossed it out about two feet away from a trout I saw fanning itself and the bugger landed softly on the top of the water and floated there. I gave it a couple jiggles and a trout came up in one of those S-curve maneuvers and slashed the hell out of it. Really exciting to see that happen from start to happen, first time for me! I got several other trout to slash at the bugger but I think it must have been too big for them because I couldn't get a commitment.


I'm going to downsize to a size 12 conehead or beadhead bugger next time. Or maybe try a woolly worm.

Met another angler and we shared the fishing hole. He gave me a nightcrawler that I threaded onto a panther martin but the boss brookie followed it and chewed it up to the hook. So until I acquire smaller buggers next time I'm out there I'm going to hide a nymph fly hook inside a crawler or meal worm and seek a round two with these guys.

The other angler and I threw in the towel about 11 am and we drove into town for some grinders.

dano
08-06-2012, 06:26 AM
I've been doing exactly this for 30+ years. Works great.

Marv
08-06-2012, 07:14 AM
Way to put it all together your on the right track, you should try some or all of these: copper jon, pheasant tail nymph, elk hair caddis, also drop into a local fly shop and see what they recommend glad to hear your still fishing.

Lifted
08-06-2012, 12:47 PM
... Controlling the line was a bigger issue because if there's too much out when the lure lands the line starts floating around in whatever breeze is out there, lol. It's like fishing with a spider web.
.

Nice report. As was mentioned in an early post, I suspect you'll soon have a short 4wt fly outfit. I was once too lazy to rig up my fly rod and put a strike indicator and a nymph on my 4lb spinning rig and was instantly reminded of the added control and quick hooksets that floating fly line allows for. The fly & spinning rod still a viable technique, but not so much in the brooks and creeks you're describing. Someone posted a video of Tenkara style fly-fishing a while back which could also be fun to try in smaller streams.

Gene St. Denis
08-06-2012, 01:17 PM
We sling Kastmasters , panther Martins, Tasmanian Devils, Ants, # 12 to 16 Mosquitos, Wolleys, Midges, Caddis, Countdowns, Streamers Large ( 4 to 8 Inchs ) , etc. etc. on med. or better Rods.. fly/ spin ... pinch the Barbs Down and keep the slack out. Add a split shot to get a little UL rod Pres out . Our Trout are a little too Large for Ul Gear .I have been tying Flies since 1968 . Love is in the Air! Have fun Back east... we will Kick Butt out here in the Great West for You , as just like the Last 50 Years or so !! Dry flies and weighted Midges are working Fine Now ... it is all about the Area , Angler Knowledge, and what the Fish what. Some Luck and a Net required for the Larger Trophys!! Aloha !! gst

TroutGhost
08-06-2012, 02:54 PM
Tenkara style fly-fishing



Funny you should mention Tenkara, I have been looking into Tenkara fly fishing. Tenkara seems well suited for the kind of fishing situations I'm encountering out here. Tenkara is appealing because it seems like a less fussy way to fly fish than the traditional manner. I located a shop two hours away that sells it and will be calling them tomorrow or Wednesday.

The rivers and creeks are on the smaller side and involve a bit of hiking to find a good hole, but there are still woods and overhanging limbs to deal with. It's those woods that keep the water cool during the summer months. Last Friday was my first crack at it out here but I've been scouting out rivers north, south and west of where I'm at for the past couple weeks, to get a feel for the waters and conditions. I have no one out here to help nor are there any resources like the sniffer. The local bait shop guys are different out here than in the Bay Area (cue the dueling banjos). I'm on my own out here.

iggybabble
08-06-2012, 08:40 PM
Go to a specialty fly shop and purchase some of the really tiny split shot sinkers.....you might also consider looking for an ultralite rod in the 6-1/2 to 7 foot range, it will get you a little more casting distance and sometimes that pays off