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Thread: Smoking Salmon

  1. #16
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    Re: Smoking Salmon



    another goodie.............

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    Senior Member dsa2780's Avatar
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    Re: Smoking Salmon

    Quote Originally Posted by CAL.NDN View Post
    Like DSA said I score my big pieces also and makes a good difference

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk


    Almost time to throw some more on the smoke, if they keep letting the river flow that is. Fingers crossed for a better return on the AR this year.

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    Re: Smoking Salmon

    Like DSA said I score my big pieces also and makes a good difference

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
    THE TUG IS MY DRUG & THE WATER IS MY DRINK.

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    Re: Smoking Salmon

    Quote Originally Posted by Skypig View Post
    I find if I leave the pieces thicker, like your top piece, I cannot get that flavorful dried consistancy like I think you are talking about, that you can take with you and not worry so much about refrigeration all day. The thicker pieces are good (better to use for cooking with; stir fry, salads etc.), but the consistancy is different than a thinner piece, and the brine does not seem to saturate through the meat the same. This is even with a 36 to 48 hour brine.
    I do agree about the longer drying time for pellicle formation. Maybe the thicker pieces would be more like the thinner ones if they were left a whole lot longer on the table to dry. I've always taken it all off the drying table at the same time. Might try leaving the thicker pieces to dry longer while the thinner pieces go to the smoker.

    For the thicker pieces, you can score the bottom and top sides a bit for more flavor penetration during the brine. I always forget to do it, but the old recipe my dad used to use was like that. It for sure seemed to make the big pieces more flavorful. Almost 3 weeks until go time!

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  8. #12
    Senior Member Skypig's Avatar
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    Re: Smoking Salmon

    Quote Originally Posted by dsa2780 View Post
    So I've messed around with the dry times and have established that for my personal preference of the salmon coming out more jerky like, that I do a minimal of 8 hours to dry it. Better yet, 12. This really allows the pellicle to full form on the fish and I seem to get a finished product that keeps better for longer than when I've just let it sit for an hour or two then smoked it. It seemed excessive the first couple times, but I won't go back to the quick dry time. Put the slabs or pieces on wire racks in a cool place with a small fan running over it if it's the warmer time of year. Some dude on here would put his pieces on skewers then place them in a fridge. If you used a heavy sugar brine, you'll get like this glowing crystal like "crust" texture to the outside of the fish. When you smoke it, it comes out amazing, at least in my personal opinion.

    A lot of smoked salmon I see is more or less baked or grilled salmon. Still flaky and moist on the inside. That's cool, I make a few pieces like that every now and then if I know I'm going to eat it within a day or two. But for actual preservation, for like protein to take with me without refrigeration, I try to dry that stuff out as much as possible without making it taste and feel like cardboard.



    Check out this piece of a fish I caught on the 16th of July in 2016. 6 hour dry time and it was a 24 hour brine. Came out with a really pronounced exterior texture.











    Here's a piece that has a similar texture, but kind of an in between jerky/lightly smoked on the interior. The exterior has that same texture as the larger piece above though. That might also have to do with the fact that I usually paint my salmon with maple syrup or melted brown sugar and rum at the end of the drying process and right before smoking. I dig some carmelization.





    It's food, so it's all subject to personal taste and preference though.

    I find if I leave the pieces thicker, like your top piece, I cannot get that flavorful dried consistancy like I think you are talking about, that you can take with you and not worry so much about refrigeration all day. The thicker pieces are good (better to use for cooking with; stir fry, salads etc.), but the consistancy is different than a thinner piece, and the brine does not seem to saturate through the meat the same. This is even with a 36 to 48 hour brine.
    I do agree about the longer drying time for pellicle formation. Maybe the thicker pieces would be more like the thinner ones if they were left a whole lot longer on the table to dry. I've always taken it all off the drying table at the same time. Might try leaving the thicker pieces to dry longer while the thinner pieces go to the smoker.
    Taking off and flying is easy, it's the landings that will kill you.



    Oh Yeah!...Salmon!...Everything else is just practice.

  9. #11
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    Re: Smoking Salmon

    Quote Originally Posted by MKE View Post
    I have the Big Chief electric smoker there are two settings, On and Off .Plug it in and go. That's why I use an oven thermometer when it's hot out. I never check the internal temperature of the fish I go by sight and taste. But a brisket, tri tip, or anything else I'll put a thermometer in the meats to keep on it.
    I have the same smoker and do a similar brine/brown sugar soak overnight. I load up the smoker in the morning and go to work. My wife takes care of the wood chips and checking on the cure of the fish. She also gets first shot at tasting!! She wins and I win. Even the heads smoke up good.
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    Last edited by Datster_2000; 06-28-2019 at 11:01 AM.

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  11. #10
    Senior Member dsa2780's Avatar
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    Re: Smoking Salmon

    So I've messed around with the dry times and have established that for my personal preference of the salmon coming out more jerky like, that I do a minimal of 8 hours to dry it. Better yet, 12. This really allows the pellicle to full form on the fish and I seem to get a finished product that keeps better for longer than when I've just let it sit for an hour or two then smoked it. It seemed excessive the first couple times, but I won't go back to the quick dry time. Put the slabs or pieces on wire racks in a cool place with a small fan running over it if it's the warmer time of year. Some dude on here would put his pieces on skewers then place them in a fridge. If you used a heavy sugar brine, you'll get like this glowing crystal like "crust" texture to the outside of the fish. When you smoke it, it comes out amazing, at least in my personal opinion.

    A lot of smoked salmon I see is more or less baked or grilled salmon. Still flaky and moist on the inside. That's cool, I make a few pieces like that every now and then if I know I'm going to eat it within a day or two. But for actual preservation, for like protein to take with me without refrigeration, I try to dry that stuff out as much as possible without making it taste and feel like cardboard.



    Check out this piece of a fish I caught on the 16th of July in 2016. 6 hour dry time and it was a 24 hour brine. Came out with a really pronounced exterior texture.











    Here's a piece that has a similar texture, but kind of an in between jerky/lightly smoked on the interior. The exterior has that same texture as the larger piece above though. That might also have to do with the fact that I usually paint my salmon with maple syrup or melted brown sugar and rum at the end of the drying process and right before smoking. I dig some carmelization.





    It's food, so it's all subject to personal taste and preference though.
    Last edited by dsa2780; 06-28-2019 at 08:57 AM.

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  13. #9
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    Re: Smoking Salmon

    I saw where the pro's with the big smoke oven and piping system to a refrig or smoke room that
    holds the salmon free from flys and critters............... can get the meat a long cook with low heat
    and heavy smoke............. and come out with a "Finished" internal temp. of 130 degrees.

    That is the light pink stuff you see at the grocery stores, that sells for BIG $$$.

    I try for 140* but usually end up with 160, here in Reno's cooler temps and high elevation.

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    Cool Re: Smoking Salmon

    Sounds like a great recipe for fish in any case. Haven't done any for a while, but this weekend will be ribs, dry rub, vacuum sealed in the fridge over night, they then go on the rack in the Traeger....Jetspray
    2003 Alumaweld, 19'6", Chevy vortec V-6, SD-309 american turbine jet, T-8 Yamaha kicker, waiting for the tackle fairy to show up to fill my boxes

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  17. #7
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    Re: Smoking Salmon

    Quote Originally Posted by Skypig View Post
    Are you doing it at the lowest temp you can and then turning up the temp at the end to get the fish up to the "safe" 165 degrees for eating? Or do you keep the temp low the whole time and not do a higher temp period at the end?
    I have the Big Chief electric smoker there are two settings, On and Off .Plug it in and go. That's why I use an oven thermometer when it's hot out. I never check the internal temperature of the fish I go by sight and taste. But a brisket, tri tip, or anything else I'll put a thermometer in the meats to keep on it.

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