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View Full Version : Boneless Shad, And Lots Of It



Skypig
06-13-2016, 07:57 AM
I finally got an opportunity to work out a technique to debone shad. They were at Verona and quite cooperative on June 5th, 9th and 13th. I got 25 on the 5th, and on the 9th and 13th my neighbor and I had a blast catching them. Mostly on chartreuse and pink flies, or 1/32oz chartreuse and orange jig heads with clear trout magnets on them.

I found this video done by a French Canadian on removing the meat from the shad filet, as opposed to removing the bones from the filet. I had been ending up with something similar to this previously while trying to use the technique of removing the bones from the filet. Then I found this video and decided I don't care whether I have an intact filet when it's all said and done, I just want boneless meat.

Now, I have lots of it.

Next weekend the smoke will be blowing. Whohoo!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Dxpdwzr_KQ


I also tried this, and it works quite well too, without the work of deboning:

http://honest-food.net/2009/05/28/fried-shad-recipe/

286392864028638

salmonid
06-13-2016, 08:13 AM
So they are finally at Verona!

That french video looks like a good way to fillet them, but still pretty involved.

Thanks for posting it.

Kaban12
06-13-2016, 10:17 AM
So they are finally at Verona!

That french video looks like a good way to fillet them, but still pretty involved.

Thanks for posting it.


If u want to eat good u gotta take the time to prepare them right sal!!!! 😬

Rockit73
06-13-2016, 04:30 PM
I attempted the French guys method of de-boneing....wildly unsuccessful.
After I butchered two fish and ended up wasting what I felt was too much meat, I just reverted to the standard fillet/smoke/canning.
Any secrets or does it just take more practice?

Skypig
06-16-2016, 09:35 AM
I attempted the French guys method of de-boneing....wildly unsuccessful.
After I butchered two fish and ended up wasting what I felt was too much meat, I just reverted to the standard fillet/smoke/canning.
Any secrets or does it just take more practice?


Definitely takes practice (100 so far this year). After you do 10 - 20 (and end up with quite a bit of striper/catfish bait) you get a feel for where the bones are really at. My first attempts a couple years ago were pretty funny. Mangled is the word that comes to mind.
There is a piece of information from the Captain Russo video where he mentions the clump of bones at head end of the back\top strip of meat. When you use the French method you need to account for that clump of bones (and remove it) when you remove that back\top strip. Otherwise the way he does it is pretty straight forward.
There are also some bones near the tail that you need to work a little harder to remove. They are hidden and harder to get separated from the ends of the 2 strips of white meat above the red meat in the center section.

mark seaters
06-22-2016, 03:07 PM
I finally got an opportunity to work out a technique to debone shad. They were at Verona and quite cooperative on June 5th, 9th and 13th. I got 25 on the 5th, and on the 9th and 13th my neighbor and I had a blast catching them. Mostly on chartreuse and pink flies, or 1/32oz chartreuse and orange jig heads with clear trout magnets on them.

I found this video done by a French Canadian on removing the meat from the shad filet, as opposed to removing the bones from the filet. I had been ending up with something similar to this previously while trying to use the technique of removing the bones from the filet. Then I found this video and decided I don't care whether I have an intact filet when it's all said and done, I just want boneless meat.

Now, I have lots of it.

Next weekend the smoke will be blowing. Whohoo!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Dxpdwzr_KQ


I also tried this, and it works quite well too, without the work of deboning:

http://honest-food.net/2009/05/28/fried-shad-recipe/

286392864028638

Thank you

Ray209Tracy
11-15-2016, 01:58 PM
Sounds good
I finally got an opportunity to work out a technique to debone shad. They were at Verona and quite cooperative on June 5th, 9th and 13th. I got 25 on the 5th, and on the 9th and 13th my neighbor and I had a blast catching them. Mostly on chartreuse and pink flies, or 1/32oz chartreuse and orange jig heads with clear trout magnets on them.

I found this video done by a French Canadian on removing the meat from the shad filet, as opposed to removing the bones from the filet. I had been ending up with something similar to this previously while trying to use the technique of removing the bones from the filet. Then I found this video and decided I don't care whether I have an intact filet when it's all said and done, I just want boneless meat.

Now, I have lots of it.

Next weekend the smoke will be blowing. Whohoo!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Dxpdwzr_KQ


I also tried this, and it works quite well too, without the work of deboning:

http://honest-food.net/2009/05/28/fried-shad-recipe/

286392864028638

dinasnore
06-08-2017, 12:03 AM
I finally got an opportunity to work out a technique to debone shad. They were at Verona and quite cooperative on June 5th, 9th and 13th. I got 25 on the 5th, and on the 9th and 13th my neighbor and I had a blast catching them. Mostly on chartreuse and pink flies, or 1/32oz chartreuse and orange jig heads with clear trout magnets on them.

I found this video done by a French Canadian on removing the meat from the shad filet, as opposed to removing the bones from the filet. I had been ending up with something similar to this previously while trying to use the technique of removing the bones from the filet. Then I found this video and decided I don't care whether I have an intact filet when it's all said and done, I just want boneless meat.

Now, I have lots of it.

Next weekend the smoke will be blowing. Whohoo!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Dxpdwzr_KQ


I also tried this, and it works quite well too, without the work of deboning:

http://honest-food.net/2009/05/28/fried-shad-recipe/

286392864028638

Have you tried brining, smoking and then canning. I had a friend that used to do it and it came out great,

Skypig
06-08-2017, 05:20 AM
Have you tried brining, smoking and then canning. I had a friend that used to do it and it came out great,

No, I've not tried that. Does it give it the consistency of canned tuna? How do you eat it, salads, sandwiches, etc.?

I've tried the slow bake in the oven for 5 hours, and it does make the bones soft, but I was not crazy about the consistency of the meat. It made it more like canned tuna, only softer from what I remember.

I prefer the dryer consistency of how it comes out of the smoker. Not like jerky, but not like fresh cooked fish either. I also like to be able to just fry it up in butter and garlic.