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hqly2001
07-29-2005, 12:41 AM
I'm intereste din getting a GPS device but not sure if i need a specific one for the bay or ocean..
will any GPS work? Is there a difference for the car and for the boat and any recommendations on brand and kinds?

I see that they sell a $200 small cell phone size gps.. how am i suppose to see a map clearly with names of the areas on such a small thing??

Fishbutt21
07-29-2005, 02:08 AM
I have a $2300.00 raytheon gps plotter on my boat and a $99.00 garman for hunting and they both work the same to put me in the exact spot that I program it to take me to.and the cheap had held one is easyer to use :o
just look for the bells and whistles you want and price it out for what you need

Hogsbro
07-29-2005, 05:26 AM
Any GPS should work on and water you fish. *If you get a mapping unit you can get map cartriges that add more detail for the water that you fish. *Screen size and color vs black and white are two factors that make a big difference in gps pricing. *If you are only going to use your gps for boating then I would suggest that you get one that is fixed mounted with the largest screen you can afford. *If you want to use it for driving your car as well as for boating there are units that will do both (mostly the difference is how an auto navigator handles driving directions). *I have a Garmin 276c that has an auto and a marine mode. *If you plan on using your gps for hiking or hunting then of course you will have to get one with a smaller screen. *One thing to consider if you buy one for boating/auto navigation is the type of memory that they take. *You can get a hand held unit that takes the same memory, so they are compatible. *As this thread is more of an equipment type thread I am going to move it to the Boats Motors and Gear Board. *You should get more responses there. *Good luck

Jan_from_Humboldt
07-29-2005, 07:44 AM
I bought one of these "Hand helds" and I love it, it's a Non mapping type and will do most of what one will need to get from point A to point B and back again in a small boat, the other thing is it won't break the bank and you can find them on Ebay for $140.00 + -.

Don't let its size fool you, I thought I'd buy the 72 now just to have one and later get a larger unit with color and all the fancy crap, but after using this one I find I don't need all the bells and whistles of a larger unit.

This one is simple, easy to use, very accurate and dependable.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Here's the Garmin site...

http://www.garmin.com/products/gps72/

The GPS 72 is a low-cost solution for land or marine navigation designed to provide precise GPS positioning using correction data obtained from the Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS). The GPS 72 can provide position accuracy to less than three meters when receiving WAAS corrections. This rugged, waterproof, unsinkable GPS receiver offers a large, 4-level grayscale screen. It's designed as the next generation in basic, entry-level GarminŽ GPS

Redwine
07-30-2005, 07:20 PM
Jan,

I hate to sound stupid, but when you say the 72 is a non-mapping type does that mean that you can't enter a GPS spot where you had success catching fish??

Redwine

Hogsbro
07-30-2005, 07:37 PM
Jan,

I hate to sound stupid, but when you say the 72 is a non-mapping type does that mean that you can't enter a GPS spot where you had success catching fish??

Redwine

I know I'm not JFH, but no it doesn't mean you can not enter waypoints of where you have fished or want to fish. *Non-mapping means the unit will not show you a map, or display your waypoints on a map. *Non mapping units will take you to and from waypoints without the map, *For boating I would recommend a mapping unit if you can afford it with enhanced maps of the area you are fishing. *Enhanced maps will show you navigation hazards and channels plus everything that most paper maps will show. *Any GPS is better than nothing at all, but for big water make sure to have a compass and a paper map(and know how to use them) as a back up for a GPS.

I have two GPS units on my boat. One is a fish finder gps combo, and the other is a stand alond gps unit, both with enhanced map chips. I also have two compasses, one fixed and one hand held. When I will be on big water I make sure to have a paper map of the area I'll be in.

Jan_from_Humboldt
07-31-2005, 09:13 AM
The previous post by HB just about covered it, with the non mapping GPS you use waypoints or tracks to navagate.

I do a lot of inshore fishing here in Humboldt county and I normaly don't go out more than 12 miles off the beach but do a lot of running up and down the coast.

I set a lot of waypoints and name them. Lets say for instance I fish salmon and head out to the spot I caught fish at yesterday named S-1.

I turn on the GPS at the dock and head out, it is tracking me the entire time and storing that trail, now lets say I catch my fish and want to go home but the fog has rolled in and I can't see more than 20 yards.

I can simply follow the trail/track I left to get back or I can call up previously set "Waypoints" to get back.

In my case I set a WP for the whistler bouy, then one for the entrance of the channel (We refer to it as the Jaws) then there are WP's set for the bouys along the channel. It's like leaving an electronic trail of bread crumbs to follow home.

With the depth finder, the GPS, a compass and a good chart aboard you should be able to get home every time.

There are two other things I'd highly recomend you take out each and every time you go out.

A case of common sense and a healthy respect for the ocean and it's ability to kill you.

Team_Sheryl_Lee
07-31-2005, 05:53 PM
very well put

TSL

basil
08-01-2005, 08:56 PM
I'm intereste din getting a GPS device but not sure if i need a specific one for the bay or ocean..
will any GPS work? Is there a difference for the car and for the boat and any recommendations on brand and kinds?

I see that they sell a $200 small cell phone size gps.. how am i suppose to see a map clearly with names of the areas on such a small thing??


Get the Magellan. It comes with a decent map of bays and ocean bouys, plus you can get a CD with other topo stuff. If you go something like Garmin they 60 dollar you to death for maps of different areas. If you get a waterproof they usually have the marine stuff you need.

Most of the GPS's will mark waypoints (fishing spots or...)
They also will save routes, like the route you took out of the dock to your fishing spot. You can then reverse the route and go home (this can be interesting if you did some circling).

I use a handheld from a 17 foot whaler and it works great. The more expensive large screen ones are really nice, though. On the big ones you can see more area and detail. The little handhelds you have to zoom in and out on the screen to see different stuff and move the cursor around a lot, just the same the little ones get the job done and aren't bad.

VS
08-11-2005, 03:00 PM
How much can you spend? Chart plotters are very nice for marine use, and I would rather see my location and waypoints on a chart than not; map detail is fantastic etc.; in my book, color is worth it; also,you can see current tide tables as a graphic from marine stations in your area. The charts for auto/land use are great also. Garmin 276c is portable between marine and auto. It's expensive at $600-700. Unfortunately accesories, maps etc are expensive. I have a permanent mount on the boat and use a portable mount in the car. You also put all the maps and programs on you personal computer, can download your tracks, upload routes etc. The Garmin 276 is small enough that I put it in my daypack; it's quite portable enough to carry on a backpack, fanny pack etc. The only drawback is that the screen is a bit small compared to dedicated marine units, but then they are not portable. I think this unit is excellent and I would never want to be without a chartplotter and GPS of this capacity again.