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  1. #13
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    Re: Completely new to fly fishing, and I have questions

    before you do anything pick up the book Curtis Creek Manifesto. You can thank me later ;-)

  2. #12
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    Re: Completely new to fly fishing, and I have questions

    +1;

    Plus a Roll cast will work on any stream with heavy brush behind you and trees above.

    Even a half hitch on the fly rod tip for "Dipping" 5-6 foot of line into sierra "Over grown" streams
    can produce wild, spooky trout.

    You don't need no stinking cast... !!

  3. #11
    Member macfish's Avatar
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    Aug 2006
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    Sacramento Ca.
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    Re: Completely new to fly fishing, and I have questions

    Always take a spinning rod with you. Starting out it will be frustrating. Fly rods don’t have to be artificial lure only either. Drowning worms, grasshoppers or using salmon eggs work great on a stream with the heavy fly line and extra length of the rod. Streams rarely have room behind you,so you have to learn to work with what is in front of you.
    Tying your own flies isn’t as inexpensive as you would think. But it is creative. Orvis used to have free classes with volunteers doing the teaching. Good luck

  4. #10
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    Re: Completely new to fly fishing, and I have questions

    Flys can be presented on the surface.... Dry or
    sub-surface or even on the bottom of the river or lakes.

    There are SEVERAL types of floating, sink tip, slow sink or fast sinking lines for what you need to do.

    #1 is the correct line for you and your rod, which can change as you get better at casting.
    Tippet or "Leaders" just match the conditions and type/size of the flys used and fish involved.

    To me a wet fly was the hardest to learn w/o an indicator to help out to see/feel the strikes.
    The long sinking cast to the bottom ( ala Pyramid Nv.) stripped in also takes time to master.
    The Dry fly on top is the easiest to learn but one must also learn about drift and line drag to
    catch wary trout, when casting across streams.

    Streamers like the Mickey Fin, Blk Nose Dace and Muddler are three top flies while there are
    several standard Nymph patterns that work but you might have an area "Special" to look up.

    As for a dry fly, my go to are the Adams, Humphy, Blue Dunn, Mosquito, Blk Gnat and for fast water
    the high visability of the Royal Coachman. Sizes: 12 to 16, per most areas but as you get better
    there is also a tiny size #22 for the high Sierra trout.

    Nothing like a lesson to get you on the right tract and prevent bad habits.

    Have fun.

  5. #9
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    Feb 2019
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    Re: Completely new to fly fishing, and I have questions

    I would start by focusing on nymph fishing. It is one of the most effective ways to fish for trout in any water, so it’s a good idea to master some nymph fishing techniques. Try a large stimulator pattern as an indicator with a nymph below that.


    You need to start by understanding what trout eat (there's a good article here). They eat under the water 90% of the time and start to sip off the surface in the evenings and early morning.

    Go to your local fly fishing store, or one close to where you're looking to go fishing. Check out some of the recommended trout flies. Then take them to the river and try to cast them in front of a fish without splashing the water. Sound's easy right...

    In the beginning you're highly unlikely to catch much. Key mistakes that I see newcomers make are, whipping the rod back and forward too quickly. The key is to load the rod backwards, then let it release the stored energy on the forward cast. The period of motion needs to slow as more and more line gets out.

    Start in an area of river with a wide open space and keep the rod high so you don't evaporate your flies on the rocks. It's best to tie on a cheap dud fly to begin with. Aim for a point in the river and just practice until you can land the fly close by. Start to look under rocks to see what you can find, basically that is what the fish are eating. You can match your flies to this and over time, you'll start to catch more fish.

  6. #8
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    Re: Completely new to fly fishing, and I have questions

    Take an "on the water fly fishing class" before you sink a lot of money into flies and gear. There is so much to learn you will be overwhelmed for many years if you don't get the basics taught early. You can find classes listed at your local fly shop.

    Also, download and subscribe to the Orvis Fly Fishing Podcast by Tom Rosenbauer

  7. #7
    Junior Member
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    Re: Completely new to fly fishing, and I have questions

    What everyone said is right on. When I first started, I bought an Orvis starter fly kit which included EH Caddis, PMD, prince, adams, midge and a few others I can't remember. It was fairly cheap and should work on most of the rivers in the sierra's.

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  9. #6
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    Re: Completely new to fly fishing, and I have questions

    We need WAY more information on what you're looking for before we can give you solid advice. While an encounter might be a good option (and its a great entry rod), it might not be the right rod for your casting stroke. You may find a fiberglass or super slow full flex rod (like the Orvis Superfine) to be a better fit. You need to get a feel for what you want first.

    Also, flies will depend on where you're fishing. Catskill style dry flies (Adams or Royal Wulf or many many others) and a pheasant tail or rabbits ear nymph dropper will work most of the time (if you size them right), if you're fishing waters that have mayfly hatches. But if you're fishing Pyramid Lake for cuttys, you're going to want something entirely different.

    Where are you going to be fishing and what types of waters?

  10. #5
    Senior Member MKE's Avatar
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    Re: Completely new to fly fishing, and I have questions

    What they said for sure. If you have a fly fishing buddy he just might have an extra set up, or 15.

    If you do get that set up start out with a few dries. Like a few elk hair caddis, adams, hoppers, and stimulaters should get you started if fishing for trout.

    Then it's time on the water. Get out and put what you learn from others to work on the water. Then one day you will get it. That's if you get into it, not all people do.

    As far as money goes you can keep it basic if you go to some locale spots. But buying flies gets to be very expensive. It's worth every penny and satisfaction to tie your own.





    Sent from my LG-H820 using Tapatalk
    Last edited by MKE; 07-13-2017 at 05:22 PM.

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  12. #4
    Senior Member Waterdog's Avatar
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    Re: Completely new to fly fishing, and I have questions

    I don't know what area you are in but if close to Sacramento check out Kienes fly shop web site. They offer a couple of different beginner classes. They offer beginners introduction classes and beginners on the water classes. An excellent way to get started and learn a lot and you will learn a bunch in these classes and it will be with beginners so you won't feel intimidated.
    Hunting, Fishing and Labrador Retrievers and at the end of the day a glass of Buffalo Trace Whiskey- Life is Sweet.

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